IPRO Future Listings for Fall 2016

Fall 2016
IPRO 397-100
Interprofessional by Design: User-Centered Digital Service Design Innovation Workshop (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-200
Interprofessional by Design: User-Centered Product Design Innovation Workshop (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-300
Interprofessional by Design: Innovating Solutions to Global Health & Well-Being Challenges via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-350
Interprofessional by Design: Innovating Solutions to Global Health & Well-Being Challenges via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-400
Interprofessional by Design: Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Challenge -- Developing Insights from Open Government Data Sets that Inspire Citizenship and Solutions to Human Needs in the Urban Environment (This IPRO course is intended to be for first-time IPRO students only.)
IPRO 397-450
Interprofessional by Design: Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Challenge -- Developing Insights from Open Government Data Sets that Inspire Citizenship and Solutions to Human Needs in the Urban Environment (This IPRO course is intended to be for first-time IPRO students only.)
IPRO 397-500
Interprofessional by Design: Innovating Solutions to Urban Problems to Improve Livability (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-700
Innovating Robotics Solutions that Serve User Needs (An IPRO course option intended for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 497-101
Developing, Prototyping & Proposing Innovative Ideas that Respond to Foundations & Other Funding Opportunities
IPRO 497-103
New Venture Development through User-Centered Design
IPRO 497-104
New Venture Development through User-Centered Design
IPRO 497-114
Developing a Suburban Metropolitan Area Rapid Transit Plan
IPRO 497-201
Vehicle Systems Innovation
IPRO 497-204
Developing an Antimatter Gravity Interferometer
IPRO 497-206
Innovating Motor Design: Creating Motor Test Platforms for Three IIT ECE Course Competitions
IPRO 497-209
Developing a New Strategy to Search for Smuggled Nuclear Material
IPRO 497-213
Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments
IPRO 497-214
Developing Insights into IIT Electric and Utility Vault Design, Water Leakage, and Corrosion to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Cost
IPRO 497-215
Smart MicroGrids within Contemporary Electrical Generation, Transmission and Distribution Networks
IPRO 497-218
Cities & Water: Innovating a New Urban Water System
IPRO 497-222
The Science of Volleyball: Applying Multiple Disciplines to Enhance the Understanding, Training and Competitive Nature of the Sport
IPRO 497-224
Technical and Economic Analysis of Battery Storage Systems for Commercial Businesses
IPRO 497-226
Innovating & Redesigning Web & Social Media Access to the Ethics Code Collection at Illinois Tech
IPRO 497-227
NEW! Making the IIT Active Fantasy Sports Exergame a Reality
IPRO 497-228
Hawk Pool: Creating the Next Generation of Cloud-Based Research Participant Management Software
IPRO 497-229
NEW! Creating Solutions for Sustainable and Affordable Nutrition Using Kinetic Hydroponics
IPRO 497-230
Illinois Tech Sports Campus Revitalization
IPRO 497-231
Defining How Houses SHOULD Be Built
IPRO 497-232
Transforming Energy -- Transforming Lives
IPRO 497-233
Creating & Marketing Advanced Instrumentation for Biomedical Scientific & Engineering Research: Ultra-High Resolution Light Microscopy
IPRO 497-234
Developing a Computer-Controlled Massage Therapy Bed
IPRO 497-235
Designing A System of Power-Take-Off-Driven Equipment for Industrial Tractors
IPRO 497-301
Reimagining the STEM Education Experience
IPRO 497-302
STEM Project Collaborations with Chicago Museums and other Non-Profit Organizations
IPRO 497-303
Made in USA: Developing Concepts that Better Connect Consumers with US Products & Services
IPRO 497-306
Innovating Education at Chicago Quest High School via STEM, Logistics, Arts, Robotics & Leadership
IPRO 497-307
Using Conservation to Foster Social Cohesion & Community Development: Focus on Imani Village in Chicago
IPRO 497-310
The STEM Education Innovation Challenge
IPRO 497-311
Social Innovation for Community Wealth Building
IPRO 497-312
Creating and Demonstrating a New Shimer+Illinois Tech+Community Forum for Collaborative Social Innovation
IPRO 497-317
Revitalizing an Existing Downtown through an Urban Agriculture Redevelopment

397-100: Interprofessional by Design: User-Centered Digital Service Design Innovation Workshop (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Martin Schray (ID/ITM) (mschray@iit.edu), Jeremy Alexis (ID) and Jaime Rivera (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-100 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students taking their FIRST IPRO course from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value at the convergence of user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-100 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON DIGITAL SERVICE DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing digital services. Students will work in small, interdisciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple digital service.

A service is an intangible product we experience in time through multiple touch-points and channels. According to the US department of commerce services account for 80 percent of the US GDP. However, most services are not that special or distinctive. How was the service the last time you flew? This class will focus on improving service experiences through digital technology. An example of a digital service (since we are talking about flying) is the seat selector application that allows you to pick your seats when you book a flight online. Previous to this digital service you would need to accept whatever seat was assigned to you or call and wait for an agent to help you change your seat. This digital service allows you to change your seat at the time of booking.

Digital services are delivered through a combination of apps, websites, texts, and social media. Shazam, Amazon.com, Citibank mobile banking, and Hulu are examples of digital services. We expect that your team will conceive, design conceptually, and test a simple digital service (more like an app on your phone than Amazon.com). The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

We believe that good services will:
  1. Solve for a real user need and address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Use existing, accessible data;
  3. Are intuitive for the user, i.e., you do not need to read a long manual to understand how to use it;
  4. Solve a discreet problem (confirming I have an appointment with my doctor) not a high level problem (helps me with all aspects of my health); and
  5. Do not require a major advance in coding or computer science in order to be viable.
Digital service design naturally leverages the skills of students majoring in such fields as computer science, information technology and management, professional and technical communication, psychology and business, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and web and app development are encouraged to sign up.

397-200: Interprofessional by Design: User-Centered Product Design Innovation Workshop (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Jim Braband (SSB), David Ofori-Amorah (ID), Ali Khounsary (PHYS) (amk@iit.edu) and John Welin (Idea Shop Prototyping Lab Manager)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-200 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value at the convergence of user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-200 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON PRODUCT DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing and developing products. Students will work in small, inter-disciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple product. The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

Projects in this class will be student driven: it will be up to you and your team to identify a need and then develop a product that addresses that need. The final deliverable will be a prototype of your concept that demonstrates the benefits of your solution. You will also be responsible for developing a preliminary business plan for the concept. We will provide the guidance and tools for identifying and developing your product, but we have found that these projects are more successful when they are based on student interest.

We believe that good products will:
  1. Solve for a real user need / address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Have ten parts or less (this is about the level of complexity that your team will be able to prototype);
  3. Can fit through a door (this is a good way to keep the scale of the product small); and
  4. Can be prototyped with the resources and funds available to you (each team will have a $500 budget for your prototype, so you likely cannot use exotic materials).
Product design naturally leverages the skills of engineers (e.g., aerospace, biomedical, electrical, mechanical) and architects, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students who are interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and product development (obviously) are encouraged to sign up.

397-300: Interprofessional by Design: Innovating Solutions to Global Health & Well-Being Challenges via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Douglas Wills (ID) (wills.douglas@gmail.com) and Omar Khalil (ChBE) (okhalil@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-300 and IPRO 397-350 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value at the convergence of user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-300 and IPRO 397-350 HAVE A SPECIAL FOCUS ON GLOBAL CHALLENGES. This IPRO section is focused to identifying opportunities for new products, services or business models that address global challenges. These challenges may be those articulated by various international or philanthropic organizations, or identified by students or faculty based on their insights or personal experiences. A particular area of focus is to address the needs of developing countries and the world's poor, but there may be other broad global issues that affect other regions and populations. Programs and organizations that offer perspectives on global challenges include the UN Millenium Project, MEDLIFE, International Development Enterprises (IDE) (http://www.ideorg.org), Engineers Without Borders (EWB), Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW), etc. Global challenge topics may also surface through other venues at IIT, including the Armour College of Engineering themes (health, energy, water, security), Institute of Design workshops, other IPRO team projects, other IIT colleges, etc.

The Global Challenges IPRO section will establish a robust agenda of opportunity areas for student exploration and application of user-centered design methods. One broad area of investigation relates to developing extremely affordable products that can serve the rural poor of the world. The significant challenge facing our global society is to address the needs of the two billion poor in the world who live on less than $3.00 per day and 1 billion of these live on less than $1.00 per day. These two billion suffer from many deficiencies including contaminated water or lack of sufficient water, inadequate shelter and lack of access to affordable and sustainable energy for cooking, heating and other lifesaving and enriching uses like lighting and communications.

It is important that an agenda be developed that broadly offers a good fit between what is needed by the rural poor in developing countries or other global challenge areas, and what our students and faculty can focus on based on our expertise and capabilities and that can create value. In general, the multiple multidisciplinary IPRO teams that are organized through this Global Challenges IPRO section will develop a deep understanding of a particular user need and opportunity through user-centered design methods. This will lead to identifying creative, simple and appropriate solutions that are extremely affordable and can be considered for local manufacture and supply.

The experience of the teams each semester in tackling a specific need and opportunity will help to build an archive of information and experience that can inform future teams about how to identify, select and develop a continuous stream of extremely affordable product concepts over multiple years. This IPRO team therefore will create a legacy of service for the rural poor of the world and the global community at-large through a sustaining IPRO project that future generations of IIT students can participate in.

Members of the team from various disciplines will also learn to use design methods, testing processes and economic and technical review processes to ensure that our solutions have the right cost structure and performance reliability and provide an appropriate solution. Members of the team will also develop their ability to learn and apply good project management practices to mobilize both team and external collaborator resources. Ethical issues arise often in working with and researching the needs and behaviors associated with people in developing countries, and dealing with these ethical issues is a part of participating in this IPRO. There will be significant opportunities to identify and build relationships with external collaborators.

397-350: Interprofessional by Design: Innovating Solutions to Global Health & Well-Being Challenges via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Douglas Wills (ID) (wills.douglas@gmail.com), Emilia Klimiuk (ID) (emila3@gmail.com) and Promila Dhar (BME) (dhar@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-300 and IPRO 397-350 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value at the convergence of user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-300 and IPRO 397-350 HAVE A SPECIAL FOCUS ON GLOBAL CHALLENGES. This IPRO section is focused to identifying opportunities for new products, services or business models that address global challenges. These challenges may be those articulated by various international or philanthropic organizations, or identified by students or faculty based on their insights or personal experiences. A particular area of focus is to address the needs of developing countries and the world's poor, but there may be other broad global issues that affect other regions and populations. Programs and organizations that offer perspectives on global challenges include the UN Millenium Project, MEDLIFE, International Development Enterprises (IDE) (http://www.ideorg.org), Engineers Without Borders (EWB), Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW), etc. Global challenge topics may also surface through other venues at IIT, including the Armour College of Engineering themes (health, energy, water, security), Institute of Design workshops, other IPRO team projects, other IIT colleges, etc.

The Global Challenges IPRO section will establish a robust agenda of opportunity areas for student exploration and application of user-centered design methods. One broad area of investigation relates to developing extremely affordable products that can serve the rural poor of the world. The significant challenge facing our global society is to address the needs of the two billion poor in the world who live on less than $3.00 per day and 1 billion of these live on less than $1.00 per day. These two billion suffer from many deficiencies including contaminated water or lack of sufficient water, inadequate shelter and lack of access to affordable and sustainable energy for cooking, heating and other lifesaving and enriching uses like lighting and communications.

It is important that an agenda be developed that broadly offers a good fit between what is needed by the rural poor in developing countries or other global challenge areas, and what our students and faculty can focus on based on our expertise and capabilities and that can create value. In general, the multiple multidisciplinary IPRO teams that are organized through this Global Challenges IPRO section will develop a deep understanding of a particular user need and opportunity through user-centered design methods. This will lead to identifying creative, simple and appropriate solutions that are extremely affordable and can be considered for local manufacture and supply.

The experience of the teams each semester in tackling a specific need and opportunity will help to build an archive of information and experience that can inform future teams about how to identify, select and develop a continuous stream of extremely affordable product concepts over multiple years. This IPRO team therefore will create a legacy of service for the rural poor of the world and the global community at-large through a sustaining IPRO project that future generations of IIT students can participate in.

Members of the team from various disciplines will also learn to use design methods, testing processes and economic and technical review processes to ensure that our solutions have the right cost structure and performance reliability and provide an appropriate solution. Members of the team will also develop their ability to learn and apply good project management practices to mobilize both team and external collaborator resources. Ethical issues arise often in working with and researching the needs and behaviors associated with people in developing countries, and dealing with these ethical issues is a part of participating in this IPRO. There will be significant opportunities to identify and build relationships with external collaborators.

397-400: Interprofessional by Design: Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Challenge -- Developing Insights from Open Government Data Sets that Inspire Citizenship and Solutions to Human Needs in the Urban Environment (This IPRO course is intended to be for first-time IPRO students only.)

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Microsoft & Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Steve Hammond (ID) (stevehammond1@mac.com) and Bo Rodda (ID) (rodda.bo@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-400 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value at the convergence of user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
Background. The well-known explosion in the volume (scale), variety (types), velocity (speed) and veracity (quality) of data that is being generated by governments, organizations and individuals creates opportunities, challenges and risks that affect our full participation as citizens as well as our lifestyles and standards of living every day. This encompasses financial decision making, decisions about healthcare, safety and security, urban systems, sports and entertainment, social media, etc. The Chicago-area is particularly fruitful for new initiatives centered on data competence and involving citizen participation at a range of levels of government. Chicago is a hub for firms relying on data science and analytics, and its major universities with data science and analytics programs in a range of fields. The City of Chicago has been a national leader in data driven governance, working with companies and academic institutions for innovation in this area.

The growing complexity of the public environment of sensors, data streams, storage, algorithms, visualizations and dashboards, offers a range of possibilities for research. This can lead to insights and inspire innovation, developing tools that help manage these processes, deriving value and minimizing unfavorable consequences to the individual, the economy, society and culture. Over the past few years, this sea change has been popularized through our economy and culture via the notion of big data. According to the McKinsey Global Institute (Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity, May 2011), Big data refers to datasets whose size is beyond the ability of typical database software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze.

IPRO Team Project Learning Opportunity in the Context of Big Data Science. This IPRO section is inspired by the conviction that data science is the foundation field on which to introduce a progressive, developmental approach to building "data consciousness" into the fabric of learning. This includes learning how to make decisions based on the best available data, and to discern and understand the meaning of the data they may encounter. Issues of ethics, privacy and security also come into play in a variety of organization settings. The goal is to advance all learners toward higher levels of data competency: data literacy (understanding data and statistical concepts) begins in the early years, data science expertise (designing data science analyses) typically starts in the undergraduate college years, and data science mastery (building data science systems and performing complex analyses) is developed at the graduate school and working professional levels. This then extends to the responsibility professionals have as citizens and as leaders in a range of roles in society, the economy and government.

Multi-IPRO Team Open Government Data Project Approach. The specific big data science challenge theme for spring 2016 is to explore open government data from the State of Illinois, City of Chicago and federal government agencies. The interdisciplinary IPRO teams will develop insights from the large government data sets that they explore that leads to brainstorming of concepts for encouraging greater citizenship and improving the quality and access of information for our citizens. The most viable concept from each team will be prototyped and tested by the intended user populations, which will lead to feedback that can be used for refining the concept and prototype so that its value can be validated. Concepts may help inform thinking about new policies, services and products. The viability of concepts will be explored and validated through three lenses: technical feasibility, user desirability and business viability. The multiple student project outcomes will be presented to and evaluated by civic leaders and professionals with a range of expertise related to large open government data sets.

The Open Government Data Project IPRO gives student teams the opportunity to compete in a refereed way. The teams will be guided along their IPRO journey through the following process steps: conducting research (secondary and primary); characterizing user/stakeholder needs; developing specifications; creating a taxonomy; brainstorming concepts; documenting work.

There will be three juried critiques involving professionals from Microsoft, the City of Chicago and other key organizations in the critique process during the semester:
  1. First mid-process presentation: focuses on identifying the best use of large dataset overlays to identify a real problem or opportunity that affects citizens in the City of Chicago (problem framing with data).
  2. Second mid-process presentation: focuses on the proposal for addressing the solution (creative concept development).
  3. Final presentation: summarizes and fine-tunes the information from the first two presentations while also including an element of concept testing.
At the end of the semester, the team that has developed the most innovative concept in the realm of data science and open government data sets that inspire citizenship will be recognized. As appropriate, a viable concept may be proposed for further development, testing and refinement through a follow-on IPRO class focusing on advancing a given concept to deployment, adoption and diffusion.

397-450: Interprofessional by Design: Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Challenge -- Developing Insights from Open Government Data Sets that Inspire Citizenship and Solutions to Human Needs in the Urban Environment (This IPRO course is intended to be for first-time IPRO students only.)

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Microsoft & Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Bo Rodda (ID) (rodda.bo@gmail.com) and Maryam Heidaripour (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-400 and IPRO 397-450 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value at the convergence of user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
Background. The well-known explosion in the volume (scale), variety (types), velocity (speed) and veracity (quality) of data that is being generated by governments, organizations and individuals creates opportunities, challenges and risks that affect our full participation as citizens as well as our lifestyles and standards of living every day. This encompasses financial decision making, decisions about healthcare, safety and security, urban systems, sports and entertainment, social media, etc. The Chicago-area is particularly fruitful for new initiatives centered on data competence and involving citizen participation at a range of levels of government. Chicago is a hub for firms relying on data science and analytics, and its major universities with data science and analytics programs in a range of fields. The City of Chicago has been a national leader in data driven governance, working with companies and academic institutions for innovation in this area.

The growing complexity of the public environment of sensors, data streams, storage, algorithms, visualizations and dashboards, offers a range of possibilities for research. This can lead to insights and inspire innovation, developing tools that help manage these processes, deriving value and minimizing unfavorable consequences to the individual, the economy, society and culture. Over the past few years, this sea change has been popularized through our economy and culture via the notion of big data. According to the McKinsey Global Institute (Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity, May 2011), Big data refers to datasets whose size is beyond the ability of typical database software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze.

IPRO Team Project Learning Opportunity in the Context of Big Data Science. This IPRO section is inspired by the conviction that data science is the foundation field on which to introduce a progressive, developmental approach to building "data consciousness" into the fabric of learning. This includes learning how to make decisions based on the best available data, and to discern and understand the meaning of the data they may encounter. Issues of ethics, privacy and security also come into play in a variety of organization settings. The goal is to advance all learners toward higher levels of data competency: data literacy (understanding data and statistical concepts) begins in the early years, data science expertise (designing data science analyses) typically starts in the undergraduate college years, and data science mastery (building data science systems and performing complex analyses) is developed at the graduate school and working professional levels. This then extends to the responsibility professionals have as citizens and as leaders in a range of roles in society, the economy and government.

Multi-IPRO Team Open Government Data Project Approach. The specific big data science challenge theme for spring 2016 is to explore open government data from the State of Illinois, City of Chicago and federal government agencies. The interdisciplinary IPRO teams will develop insights from the large government data sets that they explore that leads to brainstorming of concepts for encouraging greater citizenship and improving the quality and access of information for our citizens. The most viable concept from each team will be prototyped and tested by the intended user populations, which will lead to feedback that can be used for refining the concept and prototype so that its value can be validated. Concepts may help inform thinking about new policies, services and products. The viability of concepts will be explored and validated through three lenses: technical feasibility, user desirability and business viability. The multiple student project outcomes will be presented to and evaluated by civic leaders and professionals with a range of expertise related to large open government data sets.

The Open Government Data Project IPRO gives student teams the opportunity to compete in a refereed way. The teams will be guided along their IPRO journey through the following process steps: conducting research (secondary and primary); characterizing user/stakeholder needs; developing specifications; creating a taxonomy; brainstorming concepts; documenting work.

There will be three juried critiques involving professionals from Microsoft, the City of Chicago and other key organizations in the critique process during the semester:
  1. First mid-process presentation: focuses on identifying the best use of large dataset overlays to identify a real problem or opportunity that affects citizens in the City of Chicago (problem framing with data).
  2. Second mid-process presentation: focuses on the proposal for addressing the solution (creative concept development).
  3. Final presentation: summarizes and fine-tunes the information from the first two presentations while also including an element of concept testing.
At the end of the semester, the team that has developed the most innovative concept in the realm of data science and open government data sets that inspire citizenship will be recognized. As appropriate, a viable concept may be proposed for further development, testing and refinement through a follow-on IPRO class focusing on advancing a given concept to deployment, adoption and diffusion.

397-500: Interprofessional by Design: Innovating Solutions to Urban Problems to Improve Livability (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (ID) mail@limiashunia.com) and Robert Anderson (ChBE) (anderson@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-500 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-500 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON LIVABILITY IN CITIES. Cities function because of (or in spite of) urban systems, which can be loosely defined as any collection of independent parts that work together to make cities work better (or not). Examples of such systems include those that provide energy, communications, education, healthcare, water supply, solid waste management, recreation, and transportation. The very notion of city is undergoing transformation as new information inhabits and organizes the city and as humans occupy, navigate, and experience it through new protocols. Coupled with evolving green strategies and technologies, this demands that designers and strategists negotiate between increasingly different realities. We must consider the hybrid challenges that will be presented to the practitioner of the near future and for users, individually and collectively, as they adapt.

Students in this multi-team IPRO section will examine the challenges we face in Chicago, now and in the near future, such as increased density, less dependence on non-renewable resources, aging infrastructure and technology, crisis prevention and management, mobility, usable social space, and more (which are also shared by other major metropolises). The innovation teams that are formed through this examination of urban realities will propose creative solutions to those challenges and prototype them. In addition to increasing awareness and understanding of urban problems, students in this IPRO section will learn and develop skills related to team dynamics, project management, economic analysis --- in the context of applying discipline-specific fundamental knowledge and user-centered design and open-ended problem solving methods.

397-700: Innovating Robotics Solutions that Serve User Needs (An IPRO course option intended for first-time IPRO students.)

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Ali Khounsary (PHYS) (AMK@iit.edu) and Jeffrey Paules (ID) in collaboration with Illinois Tech Robotics

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Background & Purpose: The potential of robots and the field of robotics have fascinated futurists and technologists for generations. Ranging from automating mundane tasks in manufacturing to creating intelligent humanoids that care for the elderly, applications abound and evolve, driven by advances in the state-of-the-art of enabling technologies that transform fanciful notions into practical embodiments that empower and benefit users. Through the efforts of Dean Kamen and others, robotics has become a powerful platform for inspiring young people to pursue technical fields of study, through kits and competitions that are fun, encourage in-depth understanding and creative expression, and build team skills. NASA missions to Mars and other reaches of the solar system serve to further demonstrate the cutting edge possibilities of robotics-enabled systems and are credited with inspiring the imagination of our youth and their quest to pursue similar interests. At IIT, Illinois Tech Robotics has become a prominent student organization with passionate, sustaining members from a variety of disciplines that collaborate in competitions and serve as mentors to young people being introduced to the excitement and challenge of robotics competitions.

From 2003 to 2011, various faculty members have guided IPRO teams in robotics-centered topics, including: Creating a Robotics Initiative at IIT (as Illinois Tech Robotics was being founded) (Lykos (CHEM)), Robotics Systems Application to the Elderly Living Environment (Sato (ID)), Unmanned Aerial Systems Competition (Vural (MMAE)), Collaborative Mobile Robot Surveyors (Agam (CS)). More recently, through the efforts of a mechanical engineering student and Professor Kevin Meade (MMAE), we have offered an IPRO project focusing on developing an advanced wheelchair concept incorporating robotics elements that improve the quality of life of people with disabilities. Advances in materials, feedback control systems, sensors and actuators, and artificial intelligence offer new enablers for a variety of robot and robotics-driven products and services, including self-driving automobiles, drones, medical procedures, logistics, etc.

There is merit in establishing a contemporary and sustainable robotics IPRO course. This IPRO project will renew our efforts to establish an on-going robotics IPRO initiative, in collaboration with Illinois Tech Robotics and various other robotics-related faculty research and course activities, that over many semesters will explore, develop, test and deploy robotics-related innovations for a variety of stakeholders. In so doing, such a robotics IPRO initiative can also reinforce in our students the value of considering and integrating user-centered design with engineering design and the design methods of other professionals, creating a truly memorable interprofessional experience model, offering lasting value to those who participate and study its technique. After all, innovation is often characterized as a “great idea executed well” and thus capitalizing on the fun, excitement, challenge and potential of robotics – via the melding of user-centered design thinking based on insights, brainstorming and prototyping (the great idea) with the rigorous application of engineering and other transformative design methods (executed well) – creates a compelling experience for everyone involved.

Goal: The overarching goal of this project is to establish an on-going robotics IPRO course platform that can adapt to contemporary challenges, student interests and needs of external stakeholders.

Approach: This user-centered robotics IPRO workshop class, with 30 students organized in six interdisciplinary teams of five students, will develop an overall understanding for the state-of-the-art of robotics and related technical, social and business trends. This encompasses technologies, products, systems, application areas, and user needs and behaviors.

As members of this foundation IPRO, the fall 2016 IPRO teams have the opportunity to do the broad research on current robotics activity that can lead to creating an agenda for this semester and a roadmap for those teams that follow. The entire class will participate in conducting the research and creating the agenda, while at the same time, individual teams within the class will choose to pursue specific robotics-related goals for the semester.

Specific possibilities for team focus and investigation might include developing new concepts that integrate and demonstrate solutions at the convergence of robotics, embedded systems, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV's, including drones), etc. This could also include exploring important robotics-centered applications for user populations that may include seniors, people with disabilities, children, pets, etc., in a variety of environments, such as the home, various care facilities, consumer and industrial settings, various mobile environments, etc.

Call for Broad Student Participation! It is important to emphasize that to be successful, the IPRO teams in this IPRO section benefit from students from both technical and non-technical degree programs in order to identify and develop user-centered robotics solutions that are innovative and have value. In addition, the IPRO instructors will be an active resource in involving faculty from a wide range of academic areas that can inform team thinking and provide useful critique at various stages of concept development.

497-101: Developing, Prototyping & Proposing Innovative Ideas that Respond to Foundations & Other Funding Opportunities

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

TBA (May involve Courtney Sobers (CHEM) (csobers@iit.edu) in collaboration with Other Illinois Tech Faculty Members and the IPRO Program Office

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

At the university, students are engaged in absorbing the knowledge of their fields, learning specialized methods, and developing practical analytical skills. This educational milieu can be a caldron for formulating and percolating ideas that are inspired by coursework, student passions, or the exchange of ideas between students and with faculty. What happens next?

Sometimes, ideas are shaped into independent study or undergraduate research, or may become the topic of an IPRO project for one or more semesters. If conditions are right, solid concepts and prototypes may bake, solidify and even be reformulated, pivoting in new directions that seem to hold more promise. However, the missing ingredients can be: (a) a sense of mission and greater purpose; (b) a connection with intended users/beneficiaries, and (c) seed funding to nurture growth and maturation of the concept. Unfortunately, it is these missing ingredients that cause the concept to die on the vine and the motivation of the founder(s) to wither and die because of priorities like getting good grades and finding a job.

The goal of this project is to organize interdisciplinary teams to develop innovative concepts directed toward addressing important needs and opportunities inspired by funding sources that have well-articulated social missions. Please note that while this IPRO section is led by a chemistry faculty member, the scope of ideas, technologies, applications and funding sources encompasses any and all fields of inquiry. The lead instructor and IPRO Program Office will be tapping faculty researchers and proposal writing staff experts from across the university to support teams in this IPRO section depending on the focus of their ideas and funding sources identified.

This IPRO section is organized as a multi-IPRO themed cluster, with on the order of four or five interdisciplinary teams of five students each. The teams will gain practical experience in: (1) scouting for and identifying sources of funding; (2) scanning sources of ideas and incubating new ones; (3) conceiving, developing and prototyping innovative concepts, responsive to the mission and priorities of funding sources, by applying user-centered design methods to determine technical feasibility, user desirability and business viability; (4) drafting winning proposals that are critiqued, refined and ready for submittal to one or more funding sources; and (5) for those concepts and draft proposals that are strong and are felt to merit support, and have sustaining founder interest and commitment, creating a path forward for submitting a proposal (or handing it off to others), obtaining feedback and being prepared to pivot in a new direction or submit to other funding sources. The framework for this experience is described in greater detail below:
  1. Investigating Sources of Funding: The IPRO teams will research and profile a range of funding sources that interest them, principally in the realm of addressing social needs. There are numerous sources of funding available to address the priorities of foundations, government agencies and others. This includes such prominent philanthropic organizations as the MacArthur Foundation and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and VentureWell; federal R&D agencies like the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program; and corporate philanthropic sources like Microsoft and Motorola Solutions Foundation. At the student and local level, funding sources may support research and technology commercialization to address social needs, including the Illinois Tech Nayar Prize, sustainability grants offered via IIT WISER, a range of business plan competitions, etc.
  2. Scanning Sources of Ideas: The IPRO teams may conduct research and brainstorm concepts of their own in response to the challenges offered by the sources of funds. Teams may learn about the work of a previous IPRO team (including one they participated in) or other student project that might merit further development. Teams may also learn of ideas that Illinois Tech faculty offer for exploration and collaborate to develop her/is idea while identifying viable sources of funding for it.
  3. Innovating Concepts: The IPRO teams will apply user-centered design methods to research areas of social need or other opportunity, capture insights that offer interesting areas for exploration, brainstorm ideas and synthesize to identify breakthrough concepts, develop and test prototypes.
  4. Drafting Winning Proposals: In an iterative fashion with step #3 above, the IPRO teams will review proposal criteria associated with the funding source of their choice, and draft a proposal by giving attention to what is needed to be responsive, competitive and offer a compelling value proposition, with guidance and critique from faculty and staff with significant proposal writing experience.
  5. Refining Proposals & Path Forward: We anticipate that there will be strong, competitive concepts and proposals that emerge through this IPRO experience. The next steps are to identify those teams and team members who are passionate about taking the next steps to pursue the opportunities further, perhaps as a follow-on IPRO project or independent of a course. For those passionate and committed to pursue a path forward, one positive step will be for the team(s) to submit their proposals to one or more funding source and continue their quest.
The IPRO teams will benefit from guests that have expertise in identifying sources of ideas, scouting for sources of funding, and writing compelling proposals. This includes Illinois Tech staff from Institutional Advancement, Sponsored Research and Corporate Relations, as well as faculty from the sciences, engineering, business, psychology, applied technology, architecture, etc. who have been successful in fundraising.

497-103: New Venture Development through User-Centered Design

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jessica Barnes (ID) (barnes@id.iit.edu) and Erik VanCrimmin (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

IIT students currently have a variety of individual entry points across the university for exploring their ideas, obtaining support and even forming a team to further develop their concepts. The purpose of this IPRO section is to inspire and encourage new venture concepts in a dynamic, multi-team workshop environment that cultivates interaction, serendipitous connections, breakthrough thinking, and a touch of competitive spirit.

This IPRO section will be organized in small, agile multidisciplinary teams. The teams will be guided through the application of user-centered design methods, with an overarching balance of attention to user desirability, technical feasibility and business viability. Teams that are formed will be guided through the innovation process that begins with problem/opportunity definition and research, emphasizes ethnographic research, identifies driving insights, inspires brainstorming and promotes iterative prototyping with user feedback.

The IPRO teams organized in this section will become relentless and tenacious in properly framing possibilities, methodical and self-disciplined in developing valid and reliable data and insights, and creative and opportunistic in recognizing and capitalizing on driving insights. The aim is to inspire collaborative innovation that creates value and a path forward for teams to advance their concepts.

497-104: New Venture Development through User-Centered Design

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Kevin Denney (ID) (kdenney@id.iit.edu) and Eric Deaton (ID) (ericldeaton@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

IIT students currently have a variety of individual entry points across the university for exploring their ideas, obtaining support and even forming a team to further develop their concepts. The purpose of this IPRO section is to inspire and encourage new venture concepts in a dynamic, multi-team workshop environment that cultivates interaction, serendipitous connections, breakthrough thinking, and a touch of competitive spirit.

This IPRO section will be organized in small, agile multidisciplinary teams. The teams will be guided through the application of user-centered design methods, with an overarching balance of attention to user desirability, technical feasibility and business viability. Teams that are formed will be guided through the innovation process that begins with problem/opportunity definition and research, emphasizes ethnographic research, identifies driving insights, inspires brainstorming and promotes iterative prototyping with user feedback.

The IPRO teams organized in this section will become relentless and tenacious in properly framing possibilities, methodical and self-disciplined in developing valid and reliable data and insights, and creative and opportunistic in recognizing and capitalizing on driving insights. The aim is to inspire collaborative innovation that creates value and a path forward for teams to advance their concepts.

497-114: Developing a Suburban Metropolitan Area Rapid Transit Plan

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

The Chicago area's public transportation infrastructure is built in a spoke and hub configuration with the center of the City of Chicago being the hub and the Expressways, L System and Metra being the spokes. Like a bicycle wheel, relative distance from spoke to spoke increases the further distance from the hub leaving significant pie shaped areas of the Suburbs without mass transit. In addition, many commuters do not travel to the city but rather to other suburban areas leaving them without a mass transit alternative. Pace Suburban Bus offers some cross-suburban transportation options, but it has limits in terms of the number of commuters that can be accommodated via bus routes and issues related to convenience of bus stop locations and frequency. As a result of these transportation infrastructure limitations, suburban traffic congestion in the suburbs of Chicago is growing and an alternative to the automobile is highly desired.

Initial research of a Suburban Metropolitan Area Rapid Transit System is being undertaken by students from Brazil who are participating in a special summer 2016 research program. This summer’s research will advance initial research of the project that actually began in summer of 2015. We anticipate that this summer’s research effort will identify and quantify major constraints and significant hurdles that require solutions.

This fall 2016 IPRO team will start by reviewing the constraints and hurdles identified during the summer. The objective of this IPRO project is to develop a comprehensive monorail transit plan that, when presented to the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) (http://cmap.illinois.gov), will influence the agency's transportation plans outlined in the 2040 CMAP Plan scheduled to be prioritized in late 2017 and finalized in 2018.

The team will organize in sub-teams working on the benefits and practicality of a suburban monorail system, analyzing existing highway right of way, population density patterns, travel patterns, system utilization and capital investment. The team will develop and provide justification for a plan for SMART – Suburban Metropolitan Area Rapid Transit and present the plan to CMAP.

497-201: Vehicle Systems Innovation

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu) and Kevin Denney (ID) kdenney@id.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:



In this continuing IPRO project cluster, teams have been focusing on four projects: (1) Refuelable electric vehicles; (2) Internally cooled fast-charging battery for vehicles; (3) Adaptive-cycle hybrid vehicles, (4) Hover-car and (5) Icarus -- the flying car. The Adaptive-cycle and Internal cooling teams have further organized in smaller, more specialized teams. There is also a Business team coordinating all of the effort. This organization model for a high-tech corporation or corporate R&D laboratory, tackling several advanced concepts for possible introduction in the market, will be carried forward for fall 2016.

For fall 2016, some of the above projects may continue, while new ones will be added in order to drop those that don't appear to have potential and add those that look promising. The projects generally involve hardware prototyping and testing of solutions; however, important aspects of designing for the user and understanding the social and economic constraints are additional critical aspects of vehicle systems innovation and development.

There are unique benefits associated with being part of a multi-IPRO cluster. This includes interaction across a variety of collaborating organizations and suppliers that benefits all of the teams. There is regular opportunity for members of each team to give updates to all teams on progress and challenges. This involves everyone in a collaborative way to suggest approaches to solving problems and helping each other achieve goals.

497-204: Developing an Antimatter Gravity Interferometer

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Daniel Kaplan (PHYS) (kaplan@iit.edu) and Derrick Mancini (PHYS) (dmancini@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Political Science

Description:

Does antimatter fall up? The science-fictional idea of antigravity is now being taken seriously by a number of researchers around the world. We will develop novel experimental apparatus to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter.

Einstein's General Relativity, the accepted theory of gravity, predicts no difference whatsoever between the gravitational behaviors of matter and antimatter. While well-established experimentally, General Relativity has never been tested with antimatter. If antimatter is found to fall up in the gravitational field of the Earth -- or even if it falls down, but at a different rate from matter -- it will fundamentally change our view not only of gravity but of the nature and evolution of the Universe.

The measurement will require a source of neutral antimatter atoms and a precision device to measure their motion under gravity. Our approach is to use muonium -- a hydrogen-like atom composed of an antimuon bound to an electron. (Although the electron is matter, since the antimuon is 200 times heavier than the electron, muonium should act gravitationally like antimatter.) Muonium sources exist at a number of particle accelerator laboratories around the world. Since muonium decays on average in 2.2 microseconds, the measurement is difficult and requires extreme mechanical precision.

We will continue the development of a precision interferometer employing thin silicon-nitride gratings made at Argonne National Laboratory using nanotechnology fabrication techniques. This IPRO project started in the fall 2014 semester and continued during spring 2016, with significant progress being made. We will build on that progress by (if not already done) building gratings, characterizing their precision (and, if necessary, figuring out how to improve it). We will carry out further design and simulation studies, including finite-element analysis (FEA) of the gratings, the optical bench, and their mechanical systems, in order to understand and optimize the performance of the experiment as a whole. We will also continue experimental studies of our infrared-laser picometer-alignment system.

This project can benefit from collaborating students from many fields of study, e.g., physics, engineering, computer science, and applied math.

497-206: Innovating Motor Design: Creating Motor Test Platforms for Three IIT ECE Course Competitions

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com) and Ian Brown (ECE) (ibrown1@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics

Description:

The aim of this IPRO project is to increase student interest, excitement, and practical experience in electromechanical and electric machine design courses at IIT. We propose to have the IPRO team develop two student-oriented hands-on prototype design testing platforms for use in ECE department courses: two undergraduate (ECE 319/ECE 412) and one graduate (ECE 539), as described below.

For the ECE 319/412 courses, the IPRO team will design a reluctance actuator test fixture and the common portion of the reluctance actuator with the winding that all students in the ECE 319/412 course will then use in the future. The students in the ECE 319/ECE 412 course will analyze and design an actuator that would only require laser or water jet cutting for construction. The students in this course will be evaluated based on the design that comes closest to achieving the Pareto front objectives and for their associated analysis.

Currently, for the final project in ECE 539, students in the class analyze the 2004 Toyota Prius IPM motor. The instructors would like to transform the final project into a mini-design competition whereby students in the ECE 539 course will design, fabricate and test the rotor for a synchronous reluctance machine. Students will be given a common stator design, which would be infeasible to design and construct during the semester anyway. Instead, the challenge for the students in ECE 539 is to design the rotor lamination with the objectives of maximizing torque for a provided current command and minimizing losses with constraints on torque ripple, winding temperature, and various geometric parameters using an integrated design approach developed in this research. The students will also predict torque as a function of current commands, thermal performance, and torque ripple for the full machine based on their rotor lamination design.

Given the above ECE 539 course, the IPRO team will be responsible for designing the stator, housing, shaft, and rotor shaft adapter/carrier that will be used in the mini-design competition in ECE 539 as described in the previous paragraph. Rotor laminations will be laser cut and a rotor shaft adapter/carrier will be used to easily rotate the student prototype designs in and out for testing. Currently, in the spring 2016 IPRO 206 project, the team is building the dynamometer and integrating the torque meter and power analyzer equipment for testing of future student actuator designs.

497-209: Developing a New Strategy to Search for Smuggled Nuclear Material

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Zack Sullivan (PHYS) (zack.sullivan@iit.edu) and Daniel Kaplan (PHYS) (kaplan@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

While millions of cargo containers enter the United States each year, no effective mechanism is in place to prevent the delivery of smuggled nuclear weapons or materials to our ports and internal transportation system. In this continuation of an IPRO held in Fall 2015, we will explore the use of beams of charged particles to scan cargo containers and determine whether they contain illicit nuclear materials before they reach our cities.

These materials are designated as "fissile," i.e., able to sustain a nuclear-fission chain reaction, and the particles we propose to use in the beam are muons - heavier "cousins" of electrons - which are nearly ideal for our purpose. Muons are able to penetrate thick layers of material, and were famously used to "X-ray" the pyramids of Giza.

When muons come to rest in uranium, plutonium, or other fissile atoms, they cause characteristic gamma rays to be emitted whose wavelengths are a unique "fingerprint" of the atom in question. Demonstration projects using muons produced in the atmosphere have successfully found hidden fissile materials; however, the rate of atmospheric muon production is thousands of times too small for practical use. Recent progress in muon accelerator technologies can solve the rate problem. Thus there is an opportunity to develop an effective solution to identify suspect containers.

The principles underlying muon-based fissile-material detection systems are well understood. But there are several practical and technical questions that must be answered before deployment of such systems could be considered. For example, what beam parameters are needed - e.g., is it better to use a single muon energy or to scan over a range of energies to distinguish different materials? What energies and intensities are required in order to identify specific materials via either gamma ray emission from captured muons or (as was done for the pyramids) via muon tomography? If we use tomography to identify dense materials, how well can we distinguish tungsten from uranium from scattering data? The principle has been demonstrated, but can it be actualized in a device that will not halt the flow of commerce?

One significant concern we would like to address is the radiation safety of the device. Initial calculations from Fall 2015 indicated that some muon energies and intensities are close to regulatory limits. In order to progress, we need to determine what maximum intensity and time we can use to scan a container, given that a stowaway could conceivably be hiding in it. What are the ethical and regulatory limits to implementing this technology if there is some possibility of exposing such individuals to radiation?

Many other practical questions abound that will impact the design and feasibility of this device, and we anticipate that participants in this IPRO will identify and determine the significance of many we have not even considered.

Depending on the interests and capabilities of the students who enroll, teams will be organized to attack a selected subset of the questions above or others that are found to be important. Prof. Sullivan is expert in particle simulations. In the Fall 2015 version of this IPRO we obtained a computer simulation code called MARS which is utilized by radiation safety personnel at Fermilab in their determinations of muon safety thresholds and learned to use it for simple case studies. Prof. Kaplan is expert in muon-beam cooling and muon and radiation detection technologies. We hope to engage with the IIT Ethics Center in addressing some of the ethical questions regarding unintentionally subjecting people to a mild radiation hazard. Other resources will include publicly accessible information regarding shipping lanes, container manufacture, etc. for national ports. Students will work together in teams and provide periodic oral and written progress reports to the group as a whole.

When this IPRO project was first held, in the Fall 2015 semester, it won the People's Choice Award. We wish to continue in Fall 2016 and beyond. As we enter a more technical stage, this IPRO would be most suitable for students in technical fields, such as physics, engineering, computer science and applied math.

497-213: Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Daniel Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

There are many old, energy inefficient buildings that need upgrading, but due to code and regulations restraints there are not always viable, cost-effective solutions (as outline by the national competition guidelines of the National Electrical Contractors’ Association (NECA)). These buildings pose adverse conditions to the environment and people with disabilities, offering poor or outdated access and costly energy consumption patterns.

The IPRO team will follow guidelines of the NECA Green Energy Audit to for a building that is selected, offering recommendations of energy efficiency improvements and smart technology solutions as part of the NECA National Electrical Contractors' Association national green energy challenge, competing with several other universities. An energy audit will be conducted working under auspices of the IIT Office of Energy and Sustainability and ECA that offers maximum Return on Investment and most viable Green, cost and energy efficiency improvement. A final report and poster will document the team's analysis and recommendations. The team will use lumen meters and infrared test equipment to support its data collection efforts.

The top three teams nationally will be invited to participate in the NECA conference in Boston to make a presentation that determines the final three rankings. A goal of this IPRO team is to make the final three!

497-214: Developing Insights into IIT Electric and Utility Vault Design, Water Leakage, and Corrosion to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Cost

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Contractors' Power & Light and IIT Office of Campus Energy & Sustainability

Faculty:

Daniel Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

There are many old, energy inefficient, poorly designed, corrosive, and environmentally-unfriendly utility vaults that require high-energy and maintenance costs and are in dire need of improved design, maintenance, and efficiency upgrading. These vaults include: steam or district heating vaults, chilled water or cooling distribution vaults, telecommunications, electrical cable vaults. Liquid infiltration into the vaults can cause many issues such as pipe and insulation deterioration, cable faults and corrosion, electrical component corrosion and failure, etc. Likewise, a significant problem is to be able to identify and monitor these adverse conditions (since it is underground in vaults and tunnels).

There are currently no off-the-shelf, readily available solutions to this problem which imposes high resource management by IIT (office of energy and sustainability) and impact on urban facilities and people. This is a world-wide urban problem and impacts the environment, including water contamination. There are also a myriad of constraints to consider, including environment regulations, city codes, design, operations, and maintenance of the vaults, etc.

A cost-effective, creative solution is needed to address this social-technical complex problem. Working with the IIT office of Energy and Sustainability (OCES), Mayor's Office Retrofit Chicago and Electrical Contractors' Association of Chicago we will continue to further develop the electronic monitoring system, started by the current IPRO group, along with addressing additional issues (vault design, environment safety, vault restoration, etc.) and make recommendations for cost-effective, improved energy efficiencies to sponsors.

The IPRO team will continue to work with the IIT Office of Energy and sustainability (OCES) and Contractors Power & Light Company, an ECA member, to refine and develop a viable electronic monitoring system and address other issues associated with the aging vault infrastructure. This may encompass energy and environmental sustainability issues, chemical structure analysis, improved design, restoration improvements, monitoring, and replacement. The team will visit a vault, and the plan is to observe a restoration of a vault which has been agreed with Uretek (a potential additional sponsor of this IPRO).

497-215: Smart MicroGrids within Contemporary Electrical Generation, Transmission and Distribution Networks

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Sargent & Lundy LLC

Faculty:

TBA

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

[This description may be updated by the beginning of the fall semester.]

The United States electrical grid is undergoing a profound transformation due to trends in information technology, smart equipment, renewable energy systems and increasing sustainability goals. As the technical complexity of our electric grid increases, end users, electric generators and grid operators benefit in terms of response, asset management and efficient deployment of all types of electrical generation. This IPRO team will develop an understanding of the current development of Smart MicroGrids, HVDC transmission systems, safe incorporation of renewable energy and end-user behavior and acceptance of Smart Grid concepts.

This IPRO project continues the work of the spring 2016 IPRO 215 team. Our objective is to further our understanding of smart grid systems, fully develop a description of Smart MicroGrids and research other new technologies currently in the conceptual development or design stages. This IPRO project will give all students an understanding about where a typical utility is headed in comparison to current practices. Over several semesters, this IPRO project develops concepts and work product that is reviewed by professionals, including IIT alums, on the staff in various departments within Sargent & Lundy.

This IPRO project will start the semester with a defined focus. The team will have access to previous semester materials, including work product and recommendations for next steps. Our goal for each semester is to build upon what has been accomplished during previous semesters. As a broad, contemporary electric power project, our aim is to develop a working knowledge of all technical and social trends and factors that influence innovations in electric power systems, including geographic, human, architectural/ engineering systems design, renewable energy, energy efficiency, business management and sustainability.

497-218: Cities & Water: Innovating a New Urban Water System

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Edoarda Corradi Dell Acqua (CAEE) (ecorradi@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Political Science

Description:

The design and development of a smart and sustainable water system in cities is becoming essential for human health, safety, the environment, and economic growth. The United Nations identifies two main water related challenges that impact cities today as a result of climate change and growing urban populations: (1) urban flooding events, and (b) droughts and a growing need for quality water and sanitation.

The objective of this research-oriented IPRO project is to explore the relationship that exists today between cities, waterfronts and water. The IPRO team will investigate water management strategies and re-think urban water infrastructure: (1) to protect cities from the risk of flooding events and (2) to achieve sustainable long-term growth.

Historically, there has been a strong relationship between water and the built environment. Recall the ancient Roman aqueducts, thermal baths, and the gardens and fountains of Arabic tradition. During the nineteenth century, the edge between city and water was primarily used for industry and transport, i.e., the import and export of goods, which led to environmental degradation and pollution of water and waterfronts. In the post-industrial era the dialogue between cities and water has been re-defined due to economic, social, and environmental changes. Our contemporary service-oriented economy, the progressive de-industrialization of urban port areas, and the concurrent technological development of road, rail, air, and water transport -- combined with the requirements of freight containerization -- led to the migration of ports to extra-urban sites and produced a spatial and functional vacuum (source 1) on urban waterfronts. As a consequence, since the 1960s the development and revitalization of waterfronts has become a topic of great interest in urban planning (source 2).

In addition to the economic drivers, which brought a change in the spatial and functional use and configuration of urban waterfronts, today we are facing important environmental challenges. Cities, worldwide, are vulnerable to the consequences of climate change, which directly impact the water edge of the city and its water management and infrastructure. This forces us to re-think the relationship between the city, water and its waterfront.

This IPRO research project is at the boundary of thinking between urban planning, architecture, and civil and environmental engineering. The first 4 to 6 weeks of the semester will be dedicated to analysis and literature research, while the remaining time will be used for the design of a conceptual water system/infrastructure model in an urban environment.

The IPRO team will pursue the project objective through two phases:
  1. Weeks 1 to 4/6: Literature research. Analysis of the development of waterfronts such as the London Docklands project, research on wastewater recycling technologies, etc.
  2. Weeks 4/6 to 15: Project development. Selection of a project site; development and depiction of a conceptual design.
This IPRO project is broad and encompasses different disciplines. Collaboration and integration will play an important role in this course. Students will be encouraged to exchange information and ideas and the complementary backgrounds of students should contribute to enrich and inform the design project.

Sources: (1) Minca C., Urban Waterfront Evolution, Geography, Vol. 80, No. 3, July 1995; (2) Marshall R., Waterfronts in Post-Industrial Cities, Taylor & Francis, 2004

497-222: The Science of Volleyball: Applying Multiple Disciplines to Enhance the Understanding, Training and Competitive Nature of the Sport

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays but time may be either 10:00 am to 12:40 pm or from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Hammond (ID) (stevehammond1@mac.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Presentation Video:

Click to View

Description:

Enabling athletes to perform at a high level has often been considered an art, with coaching based on the experience of the coach that varies among coaches. Techniques are developed and passed throughout the coaching community with varying degrees of testing for validity. Increasingly though, analytical methods are being applied to sports. Moneyball analytics in baseball, extensive testing of football athletes and other metrics are used to attempt to improve team performance.

Volleyball is a rapidly growing sport with one of the largest athlete populations among female athletes and a growing presence in male athletics. Illinois Tech has recently added men’s volleyball to its NCAA Division Illinois Tech women’s program. Given the analytical skills of Illinois Tech students, sports science is an ideal space for applying a wide variety of analytical and social skills. By working with the Athletic Department, volleyball athletes and Chicago area club coaches, this IPRO project will explore a number of aspects of volleyball technique, training and execution. Students who join the fall 2016 IPRO 222 team have the option to develop new project directions or advance the work of the spring 2016 team, including:
  1. Use of the Microsoft Kinect II platform to provide live feedback to athletes in the training environment;
  2. Use of sensors to measure joint movement and force with the aim of understanding and preventing injury; and
  3. Developing web/mobile-based self-education tools for players to learn strategy, tactics, skills and drills.
The aim of this IPRO project is to apply multiple disciplines to understand how to enhance volleyball team performance. Depending on the skills and interests of the team members, this could involve measurement, statistical analysis, social and psychological understanding of athletes, nutrition and other potentially helpful topics to explore. The goal is to enhance understanding of how to play, train and compete in the sport.

The specific areas to be studied will be guided by input from students, athletes (both IIT and external to IIT), IIT coaches, locally-based USA Volleyball coaches and interested department staff. Mike Hulett of Adversity Volleyball club will provide guidance and input on the topics and methods to be studied. Mike has the distinction of holding USA Volleyballs highest accreditation, CAP V and holds the 2012 Harold T. Friermood Award, USA Volleyballs highest honor. He coached the USA Mens Paralympic team in the Atlanta and Sydney Games and began the Womens Paralympic program, winning Bronze in Athens and Silver in Beijing.

This IPRO team will also work with the Mens Volleyball team and others during the semester. This may involve observation, development of measurement techniques and other methods. The exact program will be tailored to the needs of athletes, coaches and the participating students.

497-224: Technical and Economic Analysis of Battery Storage Systems for Commercial Businesses

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

At night, base-loaded nuclear and coal fired power plants are producing electricity but electrical demand is low. This causes the price of electricity to be low. Therefore, during these times, there is an opportunity to purchase power cheaply, charge up a bank of batteries, and use or sell the power back to the utility during peak demand periods when the electricity price may be as much as three times more expensive.

In the spring 2016 semester, the IPRO 224 team explored the possibilities of using automobile engines as combined heat and power systems in residential situations. They found that there are conditions when having a generator and thermal- and electrical-storage can improve the efficiency of the system and save a homeowner money. The fall 2016 IPRO team will expand on this analysis and apply it to commercial businesses. There is some indication that even more money could be saved by such a system due to (1) demand charges, (2) the need for higher temperature process heat and (3) the scale of the operations. This IPRO team will build on the research done by the previous team and apply its technical and economic analysis to evaluating the prospects for commercial business applications.

It is envisioned that the team will be organized in three groups that will operate in a coordinated way, including offering ideas to other groups and building a consensus about project goals and tasks, as well as making decisions and resolving issues as they arise. The three groups are: a Thermal Group, an Electrical Group and a Build Group. The Thermal Group will investigate ways that thermal energy from an engine can be used in commercial businesses and ways in which it can be stored so that the engine only needs to be running when electricity is needed. The Electrical Group will look into how electrical power is billed and what the buy-back arrangements are when you produce your own power. It will look at ways in which electrical generation and storage can be used to reduce demand and consumption charges for commercial facilities. The Build Group will investigate matching the thermal and electrical needs of the commercial facilities to the size of the engine, the battery bank and the thermal energy storage. It will look at the distribution systems for delivering thermal and electrical energy to the facility and the interconnections required to sell power back to the grid.

497-226: Innovating & Redesigning Web & Social Media Access to the Ethics Code Collection at Illinois Tech

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

MacArthur Foundation

Faculty:

Kelly Laas (HUM) (laas@iit.edu), Elisabeth Hildt (HUM) (ehildt@iit.edu) and Dan Martin (HUM) (thedanmartin@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Business, Communication, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Consumer Research, Humanities, Information Technology & Management, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

The Illinois Tech Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions (CSEP) is planning a comprehensive redesign, enrichment, and marketing strategy to elevate its Ethics Code Collection (ECC) to greater global prominence and usefulness. The ECC is a unique resource, comprising a curated collection of over 4,000 ethics codes and guidelines across a range of disciplines for over 40 years. It will serve as a more dynamic global resource for informing ethical decision making in professional, entrepreneurial, scientific, and technological fields, and inform critical research into the advancement of ethical practices in a rapidly changing world.

Educators have long recognized the importance of ethics codes in introducing students to concepts of professional responsibilities, and the ECC sees a large amount of use by professors and students from many different disciplines. Other users include entrepreneurs and practitioners looking for guidance in how to resolve professional ethical issues in their daily work, professional societies writing their own codes of ethics, and consumers interested in finding out more about the ethical guidelines of professionals. In the past 12 months, over 83,500 individuals passed through the ECC, with over 146,300 individual page views.

The current site faces a number of limitations. The existing keyword search is slow and cumbersome, and lacks the ability to sort search results. Users expect better performance from state-of-the-art digital collections. Users wishing to compare versions of ethics codes have to open up multiple browser windows, and do not have the ability to download site content in multiple formats.

We propose a comprehensive user-centered approach to improve the digital ECC for greater service to the academy and the general public. This work will also involve new research on the current and future roles of ethics codes within society, business, and technological innovation. The project will develop enriched educational resources, and extend those resources to a broader audience of professionals, emerging professionals, and citizens across the globe.

This IPRO project will focus continuing work of the Spring 2016 team in creating a prototype for the Ethics Codes Collection, enhancing the searching and browsing capacity of the site, and performing research using codes of ethics in order to develop the collection and enhance its usefulness to key stakeholders.

This IPRO project will focus on analyzing and designing a contemporary CSEP web site that will be the front-of-mind resource among a wide array of professionals, and easily accessible to them in their pursuit of greater understanding and practical guidance. The following types of questions and others will be identified in order to guide the effort:
  1. How do we best understand the user experience?
  2. How can we promulgate the archive as a resource that more fully benefits its existing users and a broader public?
  3. How do we solve the search functionality to incorporate proprietary and non-proprietary resources?
  4. How do we broaden the international accessibility of the resource with translation tools?
For fall 2016, this IPRO project will focus on:
  1. Using the user profiles, storyboard, and collection plan developed by the Spring 2016 to build a prototype for the new digital collection.
  2. Planning and executing a usability study of the prototype site with different audience profiles, including those with physical disabilities.
  3. Finalizing and testing workflow for adding new material to the site.
  4. Developing metadata schema for enhancing search/browsing capability of the site,
  5. Researching use of codes in professional areas of interest, writing short summaries of findings for inclusion on site blog.

497-227: NEW! Making the IIT Active Fantasy Sports Exergame a Reality

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

TBA

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Faculty is TBA in consultation with Arlen Moller (PSYC) (amoller@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Behavioral Health & Wellness, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Communication, Computer Science, Consumer Research, Analytics & Communication, Digital Humanities, Information Technology & Management, Psychology

Description:

Over the last 3-4 years, an online exergame called Active Fantasy Sports has been developed and tested by IIT students and faculty in Psychology, Design, and Information Technology and Management. The basic principles of this game involve integrating wearable activity monitors (e.g., Fitbit, Apple Watch, Jawbone, etc.) with season-long fantasy sport leagues (a previously sedentary game played by over 40 million adults). Given the complex variety of features offered in established season-long fantasy sports leagues, and the wide variety of wearable activity monitors and activity metrics available, continued development of an Active Fantasy Sports game could take many different forms.

The relatively small number of participants who've piloted early versions of the Active Fantasy Sports exergame (~60 participants in 5 different leagues) have reported high levels of enjoyment and also became more physically active. However, scalability remains a significant challenge. Reducing the effort required from staff and participants will involve creating a website that takes data from wearable activity monitors (using APIs), organizes those data, and automatically displays or executes consequences on fantasy sport host websites (e.g., ESPN, Yahoo). Development of such a website has begun, but could continue to develop in a multitude of different directions. Deciding which directions to pursue in order to maximize scalability (thereby increasing physical activity in the maximum number of sedentary adults) is the central problem/issue to be addressed by this IPRO team. Exploring multiple potential solutions to this problem/issue will be encouraged.

The technical complexity of the project should be clear, as the solution will involve integration of new wearable technologies for monitoring physical activity and a highly complex online game that has evolved in the public domain over the past 40+ years. The social complexities of the project may be less clear, but are also significant. Demographically, in the U.S. and most other post-industrial regions of the world, technology and other factors have contributed to population-level decreases in physical activity, a trend with far reaching physical and mental health consequences. Among the most powerful tools for helping individuals reverse this trend and become more physically active involves leveraging social influence. One of the most important elements of the Active Fantasy Sports project involves leveraging social relationships and communication within small groups of friends (participants in the Active Fantasy Sports leagues) to help participants increase and maintain higher levels of physical activity, both collectively and cooperatively.

The objective of this IPRO project, likely over more than one semester, is to design, develop, and user-test a Minimally Viable Product (MVP) version of our Active Fantasy Sport website, then outline a multi-phased strategy for continued development to maximize scalability and sustainability. This will include assessing desirability of different solutions through interviewing and gathering feedback from stakeholders, i.e., researchers (Profs. Moller (PSYC) & Papademas (ITM)) and potential participants/users. Economic sustainability of the project over time will also be explored by gathering feedback from potential participants concerning their willingness to pay for different features versus alternative revenue generating models (e.g., ad revenue or industry partnerships with activity monitoring device manufacturers and/or established hosts of fantasy sports leagues).

The approach will involve an iterative process of coordinating effort led by faculty instructors with expertise in design and website development. Specifically, design aspects of the project will involve interviewing target users, wire-framing website elements, and user testing features. Website development will involve both the front and backend (using Ruby on-Rails, JAVA, and MySQL). Team members will develop communications skills, coordinating effort among each other and through interviews with different stakeholders. As the creator of the concept, Professor Arlen Moller, Department of Psychology, will be available for regular in-person meetings with the IPRO team (~2x per month), and additionally through regular electronic communication.

497-228: Hawk Pool: Creating the Next Generation of Cloud-Based Research Participant Management Software

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Carrie Blumenfeld (ID) (cblumenfeld@id.iit.edu) and Twisha Shah-Brandenburg (ID) (shah.twisha@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The Illinois Tech Department of Psychology pays for a subscription to use a cloud-based research participant management software called Sona ($1,400/year): https://www.sona-systems.com/default.aspx. Sona software is used by over 1,000 colleges and universities in the U.S., and is the dominant service provider for academic research. A local Chicago design firm, Gravity Tank, has developed an alternative, cloud platform that is exclusively geared toward virtual research participation for market/consumer behavior research, called dscout: https://dscout.com/research.

The problem facing our Department of Psychology is that Sona and dscout are relatively expensive and not ideally suited for the kinds of research our students and faculty are most commonly (and increasingly) doing. The majority of psychology research studies done at Illinois Tech involve data collection using either online surveys, smartphone apps, or other technologies.

The challenge for the IPRO team is to research, plan and develop a cloud based research participant management software that will achieve the following:
  1. combine the strengths of Sona and dscout;
  2. be more affordable for our Department of Psychology;
  3. be sustainable after the IPRO ends; and
  4. potentially be marketable to other small to medium size departments of psychology, i.e., colleges and universities with fewer than 500 students in their psychology research participant pools.
The IPRO project involves the following sequence of activities, over more than one semester:
  1. Organize and conduct qualitative interviews with the four types of users: system administrators, research participants (psychology students), experimenters (typically faculty and graduate students in the Department of Psychology), and instructors (faculty teaching psychology courses that offer course credit for psychology research participation);
  2. Analyze the two products currently on the market, Sona and d-scout, and explore if there are other commercial alternatives;
  3. Wireframe a Phase 1 software solution;
  4. Develop and beta test that solution:
  5. Launch the website for use at IIT;
  6. Investigate different strategies for supporting maintenance of the site after the IPRO project ends; and
  7. Potentially, launch the website for use by other small to medium size departments of psychology.

497-229: NEW! Creating Solutions for Sustainable and Affordable Nutrition Using Kinetic Hydroponics

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 5:00 to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Fouad Teymour (ChBE) (teymour@iit.edu) and Preeti Iqbal (ID and India Development Conference of America (IDCA))

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Malnutrition is widespread among world populations. It is mostly devastating in the developing world, and is mostly affecting children. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports on various factors related to nutrition and micronutrient deficiency on a regular basis. Microgreens have been shown to be more nutrient-dense than their mature plant counterparts and offer a solution for combating malnutrition.

A novel process termed Kinetic Hydroponics has been developed in the laboratory of Professor Teymour and has been demonstrated to produce microgreens and sprouts at yields exceeding traditional methods while providing full control over nutrient and disinfectant addition and product biological safety. This process was used by the IPRO 229 team in Spring 2016 to develop devices useable at the home-based and community scales. The team also gathered valuable knowledge about microgreen nutrition and safety information. Further work is needed for technology transfer to the typical user in the malnourished populations.

For fall 2016, the objective of this IPRO project is to develop select communities of users, both locally and internationally, who stand to gain from the use of this technology to combat malnutrition, and to further communicate with these select groups to ascertain their needs and develop customized solutions for each community. The IPRO work groups formed through this project will be expected to assist the user groups in learning about the nutritional value of microgreens, in developing sustainable local solutions, and in establishing the safety of the microgreen products and suitability for consumption. The IPRO work groups will review the state of products and prototypes developed in the Spring 2016 IPRO and decide on any needed modifications/additions to make these devices better suited for the production objectives, and generally more robust and finished.

The IPRO work groups will target community organizations and other NGOs in the Chicago area, as well as in India and Egypt. They will work together with these groups to organize select clusters of users and communicate with them. Overall, the IPRO team will develop an understanding of the lifestyles and constraints faced by the user communities and make recommendations for:
  1. How the hydroponics technology can be adapted to better integrate into the lives of users.
  2. What seeds can be locally sourced to produce microgreens that can be integrated into the native diets of users native diets.

497-230: Illinois Tech Sports Campus Revitalization

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Illinois Tech Athletics

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmckinn5@iit.edu or naoibri@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Aged facilities and increased program needs have required the Illinois Tech Sports Campus to be evaluated for improvements, renovations, additions and revitalization. This will be a multi-faceted IPRO project with opportunities for students with majors related to the built environment and anyone with passion, interest and ideas about advancing and expanding our athletic facilities. Your contributions to this IPRO projects will have direct impact on Illinois Tech campus life. The Illinois Tech Athletics will be a significant resource and active partner with the IPRO team to assure that its findings, plans and recommendations can have the greatest possible impact on revitalizing the Illinois Tech Sports Campus.

The objective of this IPRO project is to define, evaluate, improve and expand the Illinois Tech Sports Campus. The IPRO team that is formed will evaluate the needs of the Illinois Tech Sports Campus, analyze and document the existing sports facilities—buildings and fields, construct 3-D digital models of the athletic facilities including an interactive sports campus map, and develop and present alternative design concepts and engineering solutions.

For the Summer 2016 semester, this IPRO is focused on understanding the Illinois Tech Sports Campus, preparing a master plan with a hierarchy of goals, and applying expansion and renovation solutions for expanding Hawks athletics facilities to the 3100 South Federal Building. For the Fall 2016 semester, this IPRO will continue the efforts of the Summer semester with the intention of taking the next steps in advancing the goals of the established Illinois Tech Sports Campus master plan. Goals may include, but are not limited to, planning renovation of the press box and dug outs at Ed Glancy Field, and preparing improvements for Keating Hall which will require an energy model and analysis, user-centered evaluations and other studies.

All students are welcome to join, but this IPRO project can benefit significantly from the following majors: Structural / Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Information Technology & Management, Business, Architectural Engineering, Architecture and related fields. The IPRO project will meet the objectives outlined above through the strengths of the interdisciplinary make-up of the students who participate.

497-231: Defining How Houses SHOULD Be Built

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

According to estimates from the US Green Building Council and the US Department of Energy, by the time three percent of the design budget for a new house has been spent, 70 percent of the energy use over its lifetime has been set in stone. With 35 percent of building energy loss occurring through its walls, it is critical to integrate the most cost-effective and high-performance solution into the design. The construction industry is slow to adopt new materials/techniques due to the lack of a comprehensive comparison addressing cost, performance and payback. Providing a side-by-side comparison of possible wall assembly options for any given design will allow the building industry to move forward in adopting the best available energy saving strategy for a given building design.

In order to have an impact on the above challenge, the IPRO team will construct and test various wall types to create a comprehensive comparison of cost, thermal-performance, structural capacity and payback. This will be followed by creating a plan and strategy for disseminating information to builders/developers to create positive change in the building industry by impacting building design /specification / purchase decision making.

The fall 2016 IPRO team will advance the work of the summer 2016 IPRO team by following through on plans for a wall system comparison testbed, and proceed to:
  1. construct it to accommodate various wall assemblies, considering alternative structural components from wood to light gauge steel, alternative insulation from fiberglass to spray foam, and alternative exterior sheathing from plywood to high-performance;
  2. test wall assemblies for thermal performance and structural capacity; and
  3. quantify critical wall assembly aspects that include construction cost, durability and annual energy costs.

497-232: Transforming Energy -- Transforming Lives

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Joseph Clair (ARCH) (claijos@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Communication, Computer Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Humanities, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Energy systems currently harm the environment in many ways, and this damage particularly hits the poorest communities the hardest. Environmental damage from energy systems comes in many forms: water pollution from power plants and energy extraction (e.g. radiation leakage from nuclear plants, emissions from coal plants, fracking wastewater polluting aquifers, coal ash piles washing into rivers in Colorado and Tennessee), emissions from vehicles in dense urban areas, effects of climate change from release of methane and CO2, etc.

Because of where plants are often located, poor and disadvantaged communities may bear the largest share of the damage. Part of the work of the IPRO team will be to identify and catalog the specific harms that come from the specific energy use associated with the specific community that is analyzed.

Current solutions have only an incremental impact on energy usage and the environment. We have the technology to achieve a greater impact and do so rapidly; however, it will take innovative project identification, evaluation and delivery methods to achieve this greater impact cost-effectively. While appropriate solution strategies vary by locale, the general path the IPRO team will follow is to identify the scope and cost of switching all the fuel sources to renewable/non-damaging sources. The team will then analyze the cost to improve the energy use in the area of study through storage, infrastructure (smart-grid), efficiency and behavioral/cultural changes. The team will then overlay those two analyses to develop a a cost-optimal conceptual solution to reduce/eliminate the community impact.

The community scale that is contemplated for this project could be as small as a medium-sized hospital campus up to a community of 150,000 residents, including Bronzeville. This scale is regarded as most viable, effective and manageable by an IPRO team in a one-semester time frame as it applies the following methods and techniques:
  1. Systems thinking
  2. Life-cycle analysis
  3. Energy modeling (at the system and community level)
  4. Presentation of technical data to both technical and non-technical audiences.
  5. Identification and engagement of stakeholders.

497-233: Creating & Marketing Advanced Instrumentation for Biomedical Scientific & Engineering Research: Ultra-High Resolution Light Microscopy

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 5:00 to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Coleman Fellowship

Faculty:

Joseph Orgel (BIO) (orgel@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Communication, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

The light microscope has been a cost effective instrument in observational science for centuries, but there are some situations where using visible light as a tool has its limits, forcing investigators to use much more costly alternatives. However, most users of the instrumentation do not have the skills that would enable them to make the most effective use of this instrument or unlock its full potential. Some of these issues include but are not limited to:
  1. Difficulty in seeing through translucent or opaque materials;
  2. Difficulty in seeing objects behind other objects;
  3. Difficulty in imaging and focusing a 3D object onto a 2D plane; and
  4. Distinguishing edges as the object size approaches the wavelength of light being used.
However, there are approaches that can be used to augment what we can already do, for instance: fluorescence microscopy, UV-microscopy, phase-contrast microscopy and digital reconstruction. Each of these approaches can greatly improve imaging power, and even more so when used in conjunction; however, each method requires specific design considerations.

Given the above opportunity, this IPRO project emulates that of a research and design company where the R&D participants work with and share responsibility for research, design, technology development and market research. Considering that the global microscopy market is projected to be worth ~$6billion by 2019, investors will be motivated to contribute to a well-researched plan with prototype technology on the bench.... as long as they are presented in a well-substantiated and actionable plan to capture an enticing share of that market. Therefore, in addition to the understanding needed to create a novel technology, the participants as a team, must understand who will want to buy it, why, where they are, and what design considerations will sell better versus the cost of design and production.

The IPRO team will benefit from the experience of the Orgel research group in building an in-house ultra-high resolution microscope through an open source approach. This collaboration will greatly bolster the analytical capabilities of the student team, and help ensure that at the end of the project they have a functional and potentially marketable instrument.

The objective of this IPRO project is to design, implement, and market a system or systems of novel light-microscopy instrumentation and interpolation software that may represent commercially viable products. This approach is cheap and accessible compared to existing systems, which typically can cost upwards of $5,000-$100,000 and have esoteric and inflexible programming which limits their usefulness for the average lab. Therefore, ease of configuration and expansion for later improvement is crucial for both cost and operating effectiveness. The Orgel lab already has a prototype and parts in hand to instruct from for the IPRO class. This base gives a strong start to the team and helps ensure a beneficial and fluid experience during the rapid prototyping stage.

Based on the above design principles already established, the IPRO team will specify and assemble the components to make the working base instrument while familiarizing themselves with the design and seeking insights into improvements and customization related to the target market. The methods begin with digital reconstruction (super resolution + backprojection + 3D reconstruction + thresholding) of the base platform and later move on to fluorescence, UV, and Phase-contrast microscopy as time allows.

The team will be organized in several team work modules, with students participating in more than one module:
  1. Sample setup and microscope base design, construction, and prototyping.
  2. Instrument control system, electrical design, and implementation of prototyped designs integration.
  3. Optical systems, equipment and integration with 1, 2 and 4.
  4. Data analysis design and software implementation.
  5. Data collection, sample management and market research for: (i) product placement, (ii) possible valuation of technologies, and (iii) identification of competing technologies.
It is assumed that students joining this IPRO team collectively have a foundation of scientific, engineering and business knowledge of the various technologies and skills represented in this IPRO. Their knowledge and skills will be developed further during the course of this IPRO experience. Knowledge, skills and experience in the following are an asset to the team and will be developed further through this IPRO experience: knowledge of Arduino or other/ microcontrollers, basic knowledge of stepper motors and how to use them, experience/aptitude with open source software, (for instance OpenJ), knowledge of optics, fluorescence, and compound microscopy, experience with wiring electronics such as circuit boards or LEDs, and CAD experience.

The interdisciplinary team of engineering (e.g., electrical, computer, biomedical), science (e.g., physics, biology, chemistry) and other majors (e.g., business, applied math), complemented by faculty and staff associated with Dr. Orgel’s research lab, will form small task orientated teams that work on each of the modules (1-5) while keeping the team as a whole updated on their progress at the weekly progress meeting and via updates of a closed (invite only) social media group. It is anticipated that any one student may play a role on more than one tax group in order to assure that there is sufficient task support and there is natural and effective cross-team communication.

497-234: Developing a Computer-Controlled Massage Therapy Bed

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Ali Khounsary (PHYS) (amk@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Psychology

Description:

Massage and exercise are two important components of rehabilitative therapy. Both are performed by therapists at the direction of physicians. However, the benefits depend in part on the skills of the physical therapists and are not entirely repeatable. The therapy is also relatively costly. Electro-mechanical therapy tables have been developed for these procedures but the systems all have severe limitations. This IPRO project will design and develop a computer-controlled bed to perform the massage without the need for a skilled worker.

This IPRO project will continue the work of the summer 2016 IPRO 234 team. It is based on a concept developed by the instructors that uses multiple driven actuators that, alone or in unison, can provide repeatable massage to select parts of the body. The concept also accommodates customization to the needs of individual patients at various stages in their rehabilitation.

The project will benefit from 15 to 20 students organized in at least five functional teams: bioengineering, electrical, mechanical, design and fabrication. In addition, business aspects are also important to investigate as the design evolves, including cost competitiveness, competitor analysis, user desirability for multiple applications, and market potential. The team will research the existing solutions to the problem and new enabling technologies. The team will then develop the ergonomic design for the table, the mechanical and electronic hardware needed to provide the therapy and the computer software and hardware to control the system.

497-235: Designing A System of Power-Take-Off-Driven Equipment for Industrial Tractors

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Psychology

Description:

Most machinery used on industrial and construction sites is single-purpose, light-duty and gas-powered. This includes welders, electrical generators, stump grinders and concrete mixers. This portable equipment is noisy to operate, generally inefficient and difficult to move around on rugged sites. It has limited power and wears out quickly. This IPRO project is exploring ways in which the power-take-off (PTO) systems on industrial tractors and skid-steer loaders can be used to provide power for these types of applications. This should reduce the initial cost of this equipment, provide adequate power even for large jobs, reduce noise for the equipment operators and allow the equipment to be moved easily anywhere on site.

The purpose of the IPRO team is to investigate potential applications for PTO-mounted devices on industrial and construction sites. The students will be looking at existing equipment and the ways such equipment could be powered by industrial tractors and skid-steer loaders and other hydraulically powered equipment available on these types of projects.

The team will investigate the types of equipment used on construction and industrial job sites and the product offerings currently available for these purposes. The team will then brainstorm how this equipment could be redesigned to be used on the PTO or skid-steer and whether it would be advantageous. This can include a methodical consideration of user-centered design factors, technical feasibility and business viability of any concepts that are developed.

497-301: Reimagining the STEM Education Experience

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation in collaboration with Chicago Public Library and The 606 (and The Trust for Public Land)

Faculty:

Susan Camasta (SAT) (camasus@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Where will the next generation of discoveries in science and innovations in technology come from? Will the US continue its leadership in pursing world problems and engineering solutions? If Americans are to lead in the future we will need to educate our students today using best practices and even groundbreaking methods, especially in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). How are we educating young people today and what educational innovations might lead to a greater number of students engaging with STEM and pursuing careers in these fields? An informed and critically thinking citizenry is at stake as well as a healthy US economy in a globally competitive marketplace.

From The White House to IBM and the National Science Foundation to Motorola Solutions Foundation, individuals and groups are calling for innovations in STEM education to ultimately make our world a better place. What are the problems within our existing system of STEM education, what changes are currently in the works, and what types of innovations could move us still forward?

The fall 2016 IPRO 301 team will have a range of experiences that create value for STEM stakeholders and members of the team as well:
  1. be immersed in opportunities to build on critical thinking and problem solving skills as team members work independently and as a team to address an authentic problem;
  2. develop skills in observing, listening, analyzing and asking questions, and answering those questions by undertaking academic research, searching out community experts and resources, communicating orally and in writing;
  3. gain experience in team collaboration, project planning and follow-through, prototyping and testing and then revising based on feedback, time management, and presentation and documentation of work;
  4. reflect on the collective K-16 STEM education experience of team members, and attempt to identify the good and the not-so-good;
  5. increase team member knowledge and awareness of current practices in STEM education, comparing and contrasting these with “best practice”:
  6. increase team member knowledge and awareness of current problems in STEM education as well as attempts to address those problems;
  7. identify participants and experts in the arenas of innovative STEM education;
  8. reimagine STEM education, proposing ideas, solutions, and innovations in the domain of an informal environment (The 606 Trail in Chicago);
  9. consider and address constraints on implementation of their ideas;
  10. consider ethics involved in the identified problem and its solutions; and
  11. present innovative STEM education ideas/solutions to an IPRO audience, as well as users and managers of The 606.
For fall 2016, we plan to continue our work with The 606, an elevated trail in Chicago that hosts walking, biking and running. Art installations and interesting landscape design also contribute to this unique urban oasis. Our previous projects have used The 606 trail as the environment for innovative STEM education proposals. This collaboration has been with The Trust for Public Land, and we hope to spark a new relationship with the Chicago Public Library. Current thinking is that we can explore creating activity kits for Chicago Public Library branch(es) near The 606 that will integrate library user needs with STEM education and the unique outdoor environment of The 606.

497-302: STEM Project Collaborations with Chicago Museums and other Non-Profit Organizations

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Sari Gluckin (ID) (sari@wishthink.com) and Cristina Neacsiu (PSYC) (cneacsiu@hawk.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



STEM Education is at the forefront of thinking by the public, academic institutions, workplace organizations and government bodies. With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards and a push to inspire K-12 student interest in STEM careers, organizations view this as an opportunity to incorporate STEM outreach into their missions. With the help of Motorola Solutions Foundation's Innovation Generation Partners, students joining this IPRO cluster have the opportunity to work closely with these organizations to learn how to manage an effective client relationship while creating innovative solutions to meet each organization's unique mission.

As members of discrete IPRO teams within this cluster, students will learn and apply a variety of tools for information gathering, data evaluation, ideation, implementation and testing. Students will develop an appreciation for the multiple moving parts in a client-based project through engagement with an organization that has a STEM-based mission. This course is relevant for those (1) who are interested in STEM outreach, (2) interested in learning how to manage client relationships, and (3) whose careers will involve direct interaction with clients and community partners.

Each semester brings a new set of projects. Previous projects and activities in this cluster have included:
  1. Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana (developing teaching modules for Journey World; developing STEM-in-a-Box Activities for Young Scouts);
  2. Shedd Aquarium (developing teaching modules on ecological separation; designing teaching modules on aquatic microbiomes);
  3. Erikson Institute (developing K-3 teaching modules on human-made world);
  4. Adler Planetarium (creating and prototyping concepts for a meteor strike exhibit; ideating STEM activities for millennial visitors);
  5. Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (enhancing and teaching field data collection for high school students); and
  6. Southland Metropolitan Higher Education Consortium (developing workshops to incorporate maker labs into the K-12 curriculum).
For fall 2016, we are planning a new collaboration with the Chicago Public Library (focusing on STEM-related teen services activities at 25 branches). This will be in addition to continuing collaborations with several of the above institutions in support of their STEM missions.

497-303: Made in USA: Developing Concepts that Better Connect Consumers with US Products & Services

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (ID) mail@limiashunia.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Communication, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Consumer Research, Analytics & Communication, Digital Humanities, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Political Science, Psychology, Social & Economic Development Policy

Description:

This IPRO project team will continue the work of summer IPRO 303 by further investigating the question: How might we better connect Americans to products that are Made-in-USA? The team will also consider how fair trade may play into conscientious purchasing and US consumption.

In the initial weeks, students will develop a broad view of current American consumer spending in relation to products made in the United States vs those that are imported, and understand trends in American jobs in various sectors along with the environmental impact associated with where products are made and purchased. Students will also look at current strategies and tactics for informing consumers about which products are made in the USA, and how such designations, labeling, etc. are determined and by which organizations.

During the majority of the semester, the IPRO team will brainstorm and prototype concepts that can be tested to validate how they might better support consumer decision making and behavior that connects consumers with American products and companies. The intent of this IPRO project is to launch an application by the end of the semester that is a viable prototype for eventual use by the public.

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Awareness among Americans about how our economy is shaped by manufacturing is on the rise. Coupled with this is the reality that the world is still largely operating on finite resources that are dwindling. Facing the prospect of scarcity and associated economic, social and environmental cost implications heightens the imperative to reduce the carbon footprints of the goods we buy. Thus, the United States will inevitably need to reign in the consumption of energy to ship products from far distances.

Even as the number of Americans embracing a Made-in-USA mindset grows, e.g. buying from stores that carry regionally or locally made products, it is still rather difficult for consumers to optimize their purchasing power and practice a lifestyle that tries to support American products and companies. It is estimated that Americans spend close to 20 percent of their incomes on goods and items that are not essential needs, an annualized 2.3 trillion dollars from spending tracked in 2015 (see reference (1) below). This means making frequent choices about purchases is intrinsic to our American way-of-life and that the potential for impact is high.

Manufacturing has the largest multiplying effect in the US economy compared to all other sectors, creating more than seven additional jobs per one manufacturing job (see reference (2) below). And the jobs created by manufacturing are good, highly paid, skilled jobs. It is no surprise then that decades of manufacturing offshore have negatively impacted our economy and environment. Companies are beginning to reconsider their manufacturing locations and how that influences bottom line and quality. Creating greater demand through conscientious purchasing can potentially accelerate this shift in some industries. It is estimated that if about 90 percent of Americans reallocated one dollar per day, spending one dollar less on foreign-made goods, and one dollar more on American-made goods, after a year, this could add $109.5 billion to the American economy, which equates to about 2,737,500 new jobs paying $40,000 per year (see reference (3) below).

References:
  1. Whitehouse, Mark. "Americans Spend More on Stuff They Don't Need." BloombergView.com. 11_12_2015.
  2. "Number of Jobs Supported by Manufacturing in Other Industries." Facts About Manufacturing. The Manufacturing Institute updated 2014. themanufacturinginstitute.org.
  3. "Are You Ready for the Breakdown?" madeinusa.org.

497-306: Innovating Education at Chicago Quest High School via STEM, Logistics, Arts, Robotics & Leadership

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 11:15 am to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

This IPRO is a continuation of the STELLAR project begun in summer 2016. Chicago Quest High School is located two blocks from the North/Clybourn CTA Redline stop in Lincoln Park (http://www.chicagoquest.org/). Originally modeled after the Institute of Play, a non-for-profit organization in New York City that was opened as Quest to Learn in 2009, the school was tagged as the school for digital kids. In 2011, Chicago Quest was created to bring the Quest to Learn Model to Chicago as a campus of the Chicago International Charter School (CICS). The new school started as a project-based game-like learning middle school and later added the high school.

When first started with instructors who understood the Quest to Learn model, students were very engaged. The learning by doing concept had more project based curriculum that used verbal communication and demonstrated how to solve complex problems using the game-like learning methodology. However, due to several changes in the administration, the release of several instructors who understood the Quest to Learn model, and the management company (Civitas) and CICS wanting to change to a more traditional education environment, the school no longer follows the program that was initially started. This has resulted in:
  1. Chicago Quest losing its MacArthur Foundation Grant;
  2. the middle school being put on the CPS academic watch list due to its school quality rating;
  3. CICS board voting to close the middle school; and
  4. parents and students rejecting the proposed model.
Given the above developments, the range of potential objectives of this IPRO project are:
  1. create a recruitment package to increase enrollment while keeping a more attractive curriculum that students, parents, and teachers agree on;
  2. introduce a Science, Technology, Engineering, Logistics, Leadership, Arts and Robotics (STELLAR) educational model to the institution;
  3. restructure the curriculum so that it aligns with university standards and 21st century learning models;
  4. research funding opportunities; and
  5. create collaborative partnerships.
We envision that the summer 2016 IPRO team can begin to advance through three steps, although the work of the team may lay the foundation for a subsequent IPRO team project in fall 2016. The three tasks are summarized here:
  1. Task One: Organize structured conversations with Chicago Quest High School stakeholders in order to develop first-hand knowledge and perspectives on the context for developing, demonstrating and implementing the STELLAR initiative. Primary stakeholders include students, parents, teachers and administrators. to get firsthand knowledge of problem.
  2. Task Two: Collaborate with stakeholders to draft a strategic plan for reaching the objectives listed above. This may include developing prototypes of curriculum and course modules that offer an integrated approach to demonstrating and validating the STELLAR initiative.
  3. Task Three: Create one or more opportunities to introduce Chicago Quest students to the university experience. This may include (a) exposure to the range of degree pursuits, (b) introduction to the rigor of college learning/life, and (c) overview of the steps and milestones that guide the students toward building a portfolio of experience and accomplishment leading to a university opportunity.

497-307: Using Conservation to Foster Social Cohesion & Community Development: Focus on Imani Village in Chicago

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Imani Village (Trinity 95th and Cottage Grove Planned Community Development LLC)

Faculty:

Robert Pontarelli (ID) (rpontare@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Most urban populations are unaware of the opportunity that conservation in cities may offer, in spite of the great dependency of cities on nature for their very survival. In other words, although cities are deeply dependent upon the natural world, the populations of most cities are largely unaware of the depth of this dependency. Until recently, the whole concept of conservation in cities was largely limited to existing natural areas surrounding those cities and fewer regions in natural areas within them.

To-date, the opportunity for urban populations to interact with nature, within most urban environments and particularly in Chicago, may be limited to park systems, the lakefront or their backyard. The recent emergence of urban agriculture as a real estate development typology, provides a unique opportunity to both educate and employ the tools and techniques of sound conservation.

The objective of this IPRO project is to make conservation and conservation practices real and palpable by producing measurable results in terms of direct benefits for urban populations at a specific location. This IPRO project will give particular attention to the development prototype currently underway at Imani Village in Chicago.

In Imani Village 1, the first semester of IPRO 307 in fall 2015, we explored a range of possible actions, from urban planning to farming, to resiliency and self-reliance, even to the point of drastically altering the existing development program and profile. In Imani Village 2, the second semester of IPRO 307 in spring 2016, we applied what we learned from Imani 1 to a relatively undisturbed existing urban plan, seeking to integrate farming, food production and education into every possible location opportunity.

For Imani Village 3, planned for fall 2016, we will conservation principles to foster social cohesion and community development through an understanding of contemporary conservation practices and strategies, implementing them and then demonstrating how these strategies can be measured to validate their impact on a particular population. Through a brief survey approach, the IPRO team will research the history, philosophy and practice of conservation in the US up to the present emphasis on cities. This will span efforts that encompass the National Fish and Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, and numerous regional and local entities engaging in conservation practices.

In order to provide an appropriate context for the project, IPRO team members will be given copies of Conservation for Cities: How to Plan & Build Natural Infrastructure by Robert I. McDonald, a senior scientist at The Nature Conservancy. The IPRO team will interpret the content of the required text and develop implementation strategies for Imani Village using compiled research data, with the intention that these strategies be immediately employed. We will also develop educational outreach programs that include tools for measuring the results that such conservation practices generate.

497-310: The STEM Education Innovation Challenge

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Marilee Bowles-Carey (ID) (marilee1@comcast.net)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The STEM Education Challenge allows student teams to compete in a refereed way, recognizing the student team that has developed the best idea in STEM Education over the course of the semester.

In this Challenge, students will work with a Chicago-area organization providing STEM outreach and/or education. This may include local schools as well as grantees of Motorola Solutions Foundation such as Adler Planetarium, Shedd Aquarium, Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana, Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, and others. Conversations with one of these types of organizations will provide context for framing the IPRO STEM Challenge problem and developing insights that can lead to innovative concepts for the STEM Education experience.

Challenge topic area possibilities include: enabling technology; informally integrating STEM education in non-STEM activities and subject matter; redesigning physical classroom space; conceiving interdisciplinary hands-on projects; and motivating/mentoring underrepresented groups in STEM.

There will be three juried critiques in the class:
  1. First mid-process presentation: focuses on identifying STEM Education opportunities that align with the STEM partners mentioned above. (problem framing with data).
  2. Second mid-process presentation: focuses on the proposal for addressing the solution (creative concept development).
  3. Final presentation: summarizes and fine-tunes the information from the first two presentations while also including an element of concept testing.
To help guide the semester-long work of the team, important components of the IPRO Challenge course include: conducting research (secondary and primary); characterizing user/stakeholder needs (consumers, carriers, manufacturers, government agencies, offenders); developing specifications; creating a taxonomy; brainstorming and prototyping concepts; and documenting work

This IPRO Challenge experience will ideally result in healthy competition among IPRO teams within this section as well as recognizing one team for their innovative idea.

497-311: Social Innovation for Community Wealth Building

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Amanda Geppert (ID) (amandageppert@gmail.com) and and Maryam Heidaripour (ID) (maryam@id.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Neighborhoods need to continually rethink their approach to economic development and community development, taking into account many factors that influence the interaction between and among government, businesses, community organizations, and residents.

Working in small teams, this IPRO section uses a structured approach to social innovation to explore the following lines of inquiry:
  1. What is community wealth?
  2. How is community wealth built in Chicago communities? Who is involved and who is excluded?
  3. What community assets can be leveraged to create more stable, equitable and resilient local economies?
  4. How can we think differently about community assets to create new social and economic value for Chicago residents and stakeholders?
The teams will conduct secondary and primary research (intercept and expert interviews, participant observation), engaging with Chicago residents and stakeholders throughout the semester. The teams will learn how to apply a variety of design methods to their data to analyze (asset mapping, stakeholder mapping, opportunity maps, value webs, user journey maps) and synthesize (rapid prototyping) findings to create a social innovation that builds community wealth. Solutions must be desirable for users, technologically feasible and economically viable.

Students who join this IPRO section should be prepared for an immersive learning experience, as they will engage in iterative fieldwork in a variety of off-campus contexts. There will be two juried critiques of the teams' midterm review (problem framing with data) and final presentation (proposed solution including prototype). During the semester, the teams will:
  1. Apply design thinking skills and methods to better understand and address complex socio-economic problems;
  2. Develop a nuanced theoretical understanding of social innovation;
  3. Develop a basic understanding of community-based participatory research principles; and
  4. Strengthen qualitative research skills.

497-312: Creating and Demonstrating a New Shimer+Illinois Tech+Community Forum for Collaborative Social Innovation

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Stuart Patterson (Associate Professor of Liberal Arts, Shimer College) (s.patterson@shimer.edu) and Lisa Montgomery (IIT Student Center for Diversity & Inclusion) (montgomeryl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

It is commonplace that institutions of higher education can act as ivory towers, refuges from the everyday business of life where issues are academic, i.e. with little importance to non-specialists. At the same time, in the face of such charges, universities and colleges, large and small, have long sought to counter this perception with various forms of community engagement. A good example of such engagement is the diligent regard for public stakeholders in the Illinois Tech Interprofessional Projects Program itself. Of course, as with any complex partnership, communication between specialized experts in academic institutions and groups and individuals in other roles must be continually refreshed if such partnerships are to flourish and offer continuing benefits to all involved.

This IPRO project would continue the work of IPRO 312 begun in Spring 2016. The overall objective in Fall 2016 is to further develop and refine a student-designed and managed forum for holding periodic community events, called exploratory forums, on issues that unite the Illinois Tech campus and the historic Bronzeville neighborhood. Students from Illinois Tech and Shimer College will collaborate on developing and refining the exploratory forum model currently being devised and tested.

The exploratory forum model is an adaptation of the idea of progressive conversations devised by Erika Dudley, an arts and humanities administrator and activist on the south side of Chicago south side. The Dudley progressive conversation model involves hosting periodic conversations on a variety of topics (in the Dudley case, focusing on food and the arts) in a variety of spaces on the south side, always with food involved. One of the larger goals of the Dudley model is to highlight the existence and activity of organizations that typically have a hard time attracting more than a very limited local audience due to the adverse reputations of many south side neighborhoods.

The Spring 2016 IPRO team has held an initial networking meeting devoted to building a base of support for their initiative under the name Shades of Bronzeville: Inspiring Collaborative Communities. By the end of the spring term, the team plans to have held another event modeling their exploratory forum model. This event should offer the Fall 2016 team insights concerning the work of the spring 2016 IPRO team and continue to refine the exploratory forum as a means for beginning to mitigate the perceived divide between Illinois Tech and Bronzeville.

Specifically, the Fall 2016 IPRO team will:
  1. plan and mount at least one event on the basis of the model of exploratory forums, testing and reforming the model as developed and tested in Spring 2016 and further documenting the process;
  2. begin building an institutional base among students on the IIT campus for the progressive conversations forum through contacts with student groups and individuals in leadership positions at IIT and Shimer College; and
  3. begin identifying funding sources to help support the ongoing activity of the progressive conversations forum, both on the IIT campus (including Illinois Tech Student Government and Shimer College Quality of Life Committee) as well as beyond (e.g. the Illinois Humanities Council).
The fall 2016 IPRO team will be following up on work begun by its predecessor, who will have been asked to recommend approaches and methods to their successors, namely the fall 2016 IPRO team. Team members will organize themselves into appropriate task groups that allocate and monitor their time to meet the above objectives. The necessary skill sets will involve event planning, networking across individuals and groups on the Illinois Tech campus and beyond, as well as writing drafts of proposals for funding the continuing forum.

There are a number of critical stakeholders who care about this project. They include groups and individuals in leadership positions on the Illinois Tech campus and the larger community of historic Bronzeville. Indeed, in important ways, the IPRO project is designed to involve the students in identifying, contacting and enlisting the participation and support of stakeholders in an effective and innovative manner. Students from all Illinois Tech and Shimer degree programs are encouraged to join this IPRO team to have a lasting impact on the community and our collaborative engagement within the community.

497-317: Revitalizing an Existing Downtown through an Urban Agriculture Redevelopment

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Semester:

Fall 2016

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Robert Pontarelli (ID) (rpontare@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

This IPRO project explores the possibility of creating a downtown lakefront development that combines authentic controlled environment agriculture with mixed-use zoning as a new paradigm for urban redevelopment. Like many smaller American cities, Waukegan, located along the shore of Lake Michigan north of Chicago, has suffered numerous attempts at redeveloping their downtown with few if any results. Most of the failed proposals have depended upon designs that sought to draw residential buyers into the downtown through new residential townhouse development.

This IPRO project is based on an urban agriculture real estate development opportunity for the City of Waukegan that includes both housing and commercial businesses in addition to a working farm.

The IPRO team will create a design for a working urban farm, along with new housing and commercial businesses located on an existing vacant, multi-acre lakefront site in downtown Waukegan within walking distance of the existing Metra Train Station. The intended reception on behalf of the stakeholders, the City of Waukegan, is that they will see a mixed-use, agricultural urbanism as an opportunity to generate (regenerate) downtown redevelopment organically, through food-making and the community that food-making fosters.

We anticipate that the IPRO team will be organized in the following task groups in order to achieve the project objectives: (1) Zoning & Land Use; (2) Finance; (3) Urban Design; and (4) Infrastructure. The purpose and activities of each group are described below.

Zoning and Land Use Team. Team members will research historic examples of planning unusual mixed-use sites in dense urban settings (intimate juxtapositions of seemingly incongruent functions)-relative to zoning. Team members will have or will develop a knowledge of existing zoning and building codes as well as the Planned Urban Development process (PUD), relative to this particular product/application/use. The Zoning and Land Use Team will provide the Design Team with the necessary parameters to prepare the required PUD documentation.

Finance Team. Team members will research the financial parameters of real estate development in general and more specifically, urban redevelopment schemes relative to financing. Team members will develop a broad understanding of the cost issues relative to development and only a cursory sense of financing. The Finance Team will have an understanding of the project finances relative to farming-both under roof (greenhouses as well as closed-building models) as well as open-land components and the ramifications of both the commercial and residential components of the project.

Architectural Team. Team members will research historical examples of seemingly incongruent juxtapositions relative to morphology impacts. This team will develop a broad understanding of the PUD process relative to content and professional presentation.

Infrastructure Team. This team will research the feasibility of sewer, water, power and transportation components of the project. The team will also explore intermodal opportunities, e.g., using sail-power to deliver goods between greater downtown Chicago, Milwaukee and other city centers.

It is anticipated that officials of the City of Waukegan, stakeholders for the proposed project, will participate with students to review concepts and development of creative and viable solutions for redevelopment. It is also likely that such officials will help identify suitable candidate sites and provide the supporting data associated with those properties.