Welcome to the IPRO Project Course Listings!

Our aim is to provide students planning to enroll in an IPRO project course section with the information needed to make informed decisions that can result in the best possible experience for everyone. Please check back occasionally, as new projects may be added or there may be appeals for certain majors on various teams.

The diversity of topics, instructors, sponsors and community partners you discover here reflect the value of the interprofessional project to students from across IIT's professional programs. Thanks for your participation, interest and support --- and we are always interested in hearing from you!

Tom Jacobius, Director, IPRO Operations & External Relations (jacobius@iit.edu)

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IPRO Current Listings for Summer 2016

IPRO 000
IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SUMMER 2016
IPRO 497-116
Establishing a Nondestructive Testing Laboratory at Illinois Tech
IPRO 497-207
An Open-Source Web Interface for Computer-Aided Drug Design
IPRO 497-217
Assistive Technologies for People with Full or Partial Physical Disability at IIT
IPRO 497-230
Illinois Tech Sports Campus Revitalization
IPRO 497-231
Defining How Houses SHOULD Be Built
IPRO 497-234
Development of a Computer-Controlled Massage Therapy Bed
IPRO 497-303
Made in USA: Developing Concepts that Better Connect Consumers with US Products & Services
IPRO 497-306
Innovating Education at Chicago Quest High School via STEM, Logistics, Arts, Robotics & Leadership
IPRO 497-308
Urban Activators: Insert + Deploy + Engage
IPRO 497-311
Social Innovation for Community Wealth Building (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-313
Social and Economic Development Challenges in Chinatown: Assessing Change in a Transitioning Urban Neighborhood (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-314
Microgrids: Design for Socially Innovative, Socio-Technical Systems with and for Communities
IPRO 497-315
Global Human Centered Design: An IPRO Study Abroad Experience
IPRO 497-318
Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Summer Workshop
IPRO 497-346
Beneficial Use of Commercial Building Air Conditioning Condensate
IPRO 497-379
Usability & Social Networking with PassLok

000: IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SUMMER 2016

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Meeting Days/Time:

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Appropriate Disciplines:

Description:

Summer 2016 IPRO sections will be listed here on a rolling basis between February and March 2016, so please check once in a while to see what new sections might have been added. At the same time, the IPRO sections will be listed under the subject "Interprofessional Project" by the registrar in the MyIIT portal for registration. Most summer IPRO sections are scheduled for the eight-week Session B which begins June 6 and concludes July 29; however, there is also one IPRO section scheduled for the six-week Session A which begins May 23 and concludes July 2.

For the summer, we may be offering on the order of 8 to 10 traditional IPRO 497-3xx sections with 10 to 12 students each for students taking either their first or second IPRO course.

IPRO sections are set up with capacity limits and limits on the number of students from the majors that are expected to be most attracted to a specific IPRO project. As a result, it may appear that there are seats available in the registration system; however, some of those seats may be reserved for specific majors in order to best manage the multidisciplinary composition of the team.

If you are unable to register because the section is at capacity or there may be a seat limit for your major (as described above), you are urged to consider other IPRO sections that interest you. You may also add yourself to the wait list for a closed IPRO section. Students who are waitlisted will be reviewed by the IPRO Program staff and instructor if there is an opportunity to add students to a given IPRO section.

Questions about choosing an IPRO project and IPRO registration can be directed to Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu) or Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

497-116: Establishing a Nondestructive Testing Laboratory at Illinois Tech

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Philip Nash (MMAE) (nashp@iit.edu) and Sheldon Mostovoy (MMAE)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics

Description:

The development of new materials coupled with increased product complexity and aging of infrastructure has made nondestructive testing (NDT) a critical element of modern society. Knowledge of NDT techniques is essential for mechanical, materials and aerospace engineers as well as other professionals in manufacturing, electronics etc. This IPRO team will gather information on existing nondestructive testing techniques, inventory the available resources within Illinois Tech, formulate a plan to obtain missing equipment, identify space for a dedicated laboratory and develop laboratory experiments to serve the needs of the Illinois Tech community.

In modern manufacturing, quality assurance is a necessity to remain competitive. Application of destructive testing in industry results in only a few components being tested and relies on the assumption that the samples are statistically representative. With non-destructive testing (NDT) there is the possibility of testing all components to better ensure consistency. Additionally, parts can be tested mid-service, often in situ, in order to define the appropriate remaining service life of a part and remove faulty parts from service before they cause a newsworthy disaster. Illinois Tech has equipment available around the Mies Campus to become a leader in NDT performance and training. Gathering these resources and connecting them with existing demands for NDT on campus and in industry is the central undertaking of this IPRO project.

The scope of tasks of the IPRO team will encompass the following:
  1. Identify NDT demands of existing groups at Illinois Tech as well as local industry;
  2. Catalog resources already available on campus;
  3. Establish core competencies of the NDT Lab;
  4. Identify critical gaps based on resources and demands (within the university and with NDT in general so that creative solutions can be found);
  5. Prepare training materials to advance Illinois Tech student competency in advanced NDT techniques and analysis of data obtained;
  6. Promote the established NDT lab to internal and external users; and
  7. Develop a marketing strategy to stimulate interest from industry.
The MMAE department already has access to electronic speckle pattern interferometry, dye penetrant inspection, endoscopy and profilometry. The team will create an inventory of this equipment and its state of functionality. NDT resources in other departments will be identified by the team. The team will have structured conversations with a range of faculty, student and staff groups that can benefit from NDT to discuss their needs and interests. This includes AIAA, ASME, University Tech Park incubator Companies, IPRO teams, the Idea Shop, etc. and faculty teaching various courses and conducting research in areas that involve inspection technologies and techniques.

Based on the above inventory and discussions with user groups, the core competencies for the NDT Lab will be identified. A gap analysis will be performed to round out the capabilities of the lab to meet the largest demands. In addition, the IPRO team will develop a training program for NDT at Illinois Tech that will benefit MMAE and other academic units, as well as industry. This will be supported by creating appropriate information materials about the new NDT program. return to top

497-207: An Open-Source Web Interface for Computer-Aided Drug Design

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Tuedays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

David Minh (CHEM) (dminh@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

A key aspect of pharmaceutical research and development is drug design - engineering a molecule with just the right properties to treat a disease without harming the body. My research group is developing a new computer program to improve predictions about whether or not a molecule will bind to its intended target. In Fall 2015, an IPRO class started designing and building an open-source web-based graphical user interface (GUI) to the program. (This project was not pursued in Spring 2016). The GUI still needs significant refinement and testing. When complete, it will enable more molecular engineers to more easily access our cutting-edge algorithms, ultimately accelerating drug discovery.

The objective will be to refine and test the web-based GUI for our program, AlGDock (https://github.com/ccbatiit/algdock/). The present version of the GUI is located at https://github.com/gkumar7/AlGDock. For testing purposes, the initial GUI will be based on UCSF DOCK 6, which performs faster but less accurate binding affinity predictions. During this IPRO, the team will develop ways to keep track of calculations in progress and to analyze and visualize results. The team will also perform user testing with non-programmers in academic and/or industrial chemistry laboratories involved in drug design. As with AlGDock, the programs will be made available with the open-source MIT license. This license will facilitate use, enable future teams to build upon the programs, and allow contributors to establish a public portfolio of design/programming/project management.

We anticipate that the team will address the issue through brainstorming and iterating designs, writing software, and testing it. The team should be interdisciplinary, primarily composed of specialists in web development and, to a lesser extent, molecular science. It is also desirable for a team member to assume the role of project manager. The team should communicate with algorithm developers (our research group) as well as potential users in pharmaceutical research laboratories. The team should establish realistic goals based on their background and experience and achieve them in a timely manner. return to top

497-217: Assistive Technologies for People with Full or Partial Physical Disability at IIT

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 to 12:25 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Mahesh Krishnamurthy (ECE) (kmahesh@ece.iit.edu) and Eun-Jeong Lee (PSYC) (elee20@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

It is well understood that modern assistive technologies (AT) or electronic aids for daily living (EADL) can be very effective in improving the quality of life for people with disabilities. In an educational setting, AT is provided to help students with disabilities increase participation in class activities. However, courses in science and engineering include laboratory components and in-class activities/demonstrations, and require significant interaction with the instructor and other students. Compared to the K-12 education setting, the post secondary education setting expects more self-discipline and independence of students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). However, when these students begin their higher education experience, they may not be ready to navigate this environment on their own and, without a monitoring structure (e.g., individualized education plan), they may not be able to keep up with class tasks and advocate for themselves in a classroom setting. In fact, the majority of students with disability drop out in their first year of college. Students with IDD may not access or use disability service centers and consequently experience physical and psychological issues, lack of confidence, and poor academic achievement. In addition, instructors may fail to develop their courses in accordance with the principles for universal design for learning (UDL), with the result that course content may be inaccessible.

This is a continuing project from Summer 2015. It will identify challenges faced by students with disabilities faced at institutes of higher education. It will particularly focus on STEM education, which is typically more tactile in terms of instruction. The team will also explore issues faced by students with IDD and propose appropriate EADL solutions.

The instructors have significant experience in this area. The project will carry out a thorough study of solutions (if any) that are currently in use by different educational institutions for students with physical and intellectual (invisible) disabilities. Interviews will be conducted with special ed teachers in higher education to understand effective solutions and identify technology-based solutions to increase retention of these students in STEM programs past the first year. return to top

497-230: Illinois Tech Sports Campus Revitalization

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 8:50 pm pm

Sponsor:

Illinois Tech Athletics

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmckinn5@iit.edu or naoibri@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Aged facilities and increased program needs have required the Illinois Tech Sports Campus to be evaluated for improvements, renovations, additions and revitalization. This will be a multi-faceted IPRO project with opportunities for students with majors related to the built environment and anyone with passion, interest and ideas about advancing and expanding our athletic facilities. Your contributions to this IPRO projects will have direct impact on Illinois Tech campus life. The Illinois Tech Athletics will be a significant resource and active partner with the IPRO team to assure that its findings, plans and recommendations can have the greatest possible impact on revitalizing the Illinois Tech Sports Campus.

The objective of this IPRO project is to define, evaluate, improve and expand the Illinois Tech Sports Campus. The IPRO team that is formed will evaluate the needs of the Illinois Tech Sports Campus, analyze and document the existing sports facilities—buildings and fields, construct 3-D digital models of the athletic facilities including an interactive sports campus map, and develop and present alternative design concepts and engineering solutions.

For the Summer 2016 semester, this IPRO is focused on understanding the Illinois Tech Sports Campus, preparing a master plan with a hierarchy of goals, and applying expansion and renovation solutions for expanding Hawks athletics facilities to the 3100 South Federal Building. For the Fall 2016 semester, this IPRO will continue the efforts of the Summer semester with the intention of taking the next steps in advancing the goals of the established Illinois Tech Sports Campus master plan. Goals may include, but are not limited to, planning renovation of the press box and dug outs at Ed Glancy Field, and preparing improvements for Keating Hall which will require an energy model and analysis, user-centered evaluations and other studies.

All students are welcome to join, but this IPRO project can benefit significantly from the following majors: Structural / Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Information Technology & Management, Business, Architectural Engineering, Architecture and related fields. The IPRO project will meet the objectives outlined above through the strengths of the interdisciplinary make-up of the students who participate.return to top

497-231: Defining How Houses SHOULD Be Built

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 5:00 to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

According to estimates from the US Green Building Council and the US Department of Energy, by the time three percent of the design budget for a new house has been spent, 70 percent of the energy use over its lifetime has been set in stone. With 35 percent of building energy loss occurring through its walls, it is critical to integrate the most cost-effective and high-performance solution into the design. The construction industry is slow to adopt new materials/techniques due to the lack of a comprehensive comparison addressing cost, performance and payback. Providing a side-by-side comparison of possible wall assembly options for any given design will allow the building industry to move forward in adopting the best available energy saving strategy for a given building design.

In order to have an impact on the above challenge, the IPRO team will construct and test various wall types to create a comprehensive comparison of cost, thermal-performance, structural capacity and payback. This will be followed by creating a plan and strategy for disseminating information to builders/developers to create positive change in the building industry by impacting building design /specification / purchase decision making.

The IPRO team will develop a plan for a wall system comparison testbed, and proceed to:
  1. construct it to accommodate various wall assemblies, considering alternative structural components from wood to light gauge steel, alternative insulation from fiberglass to spray foam, and alternative exterior sheathing from plywood to high-performance;
  2. test wall assemblies for thermal performance and structural capacity; and
  3. quantify critical wall assembly aspects that include construction cost, durability and annual energy costs.
It is anticipated that this project will continue into the fall 2016 semester in order to make further progress in achieving overall project goals.return to top

497-234: Development of a Computer-Controlled Massage Therapy Bed

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Ali Khounsary (PHYS) (akhounsa@iit.edu) and Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Psychology

Description:

Massage and exercise are two important components of rehabilitative therapy. Both are performed by therapists at the direction of physicians. However, the benefits depend in part on the skills of the physical therapists and are not entirely repeatable. The therapy is also relatively costly. Electro-mechanical therapy tables have been developed for these procedures but the systems all have severe limitations. This IPRO project will design and develop a computer-controlled bed to perform the massage without the need for a skilled worker.

It is based on a concept developed by the instructors that uses multiple driven actuators that, alone or in unison, can provide repeatable massage to select parts of the body. The concept also accommodates customization to the needs of individual patients at various stages in their rehabilitation.

The project will benefit from 15 to 20 students organized in at least five functional teams: bioengineering, electrical, mechanical, design and fabrication. In addition, business aspects are also important to investigate as the design evolves, including cost competitiveness, competitor analysis, user desirability for multiple applications, and market potential. The team will research the existing solutions to the problem and new enabling technologies. The team will then develop the ergonomic design for the table, the mechanical and electronic hardware needed to provide the therapy and the computer software and hardware to control the system. This IPRO project is planned to continue in fall 2016.return to top

497-303: Made in USA: Developing Concepts that Better Connect Consumers with US Products & Services

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:15 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (ID) mail@limiashunia.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, , Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Awareness among Americans about how our economy is shaped by manufacturing is on the rise. Coupled with this is the reality that the world is still largely operating on finite resources that are dwindling. Facing the prospect of scarcity and associated economic, social and environmental cost implications heightens the imperative to the reduce carbon footprints of the goods we buy. Thus, the United States will inevitably need to reign in the consumption of energy to ship products from far distances.

Even as the number of Americans embracing a Made-in-USA mindset grows, e.g. buying from stores that carry regionally or locally made products, it is still rather difficult for consumers to optimize their purchasing power and practice a lifestyle that tries to support American products and companies. It is estimated that Americans spend close to 20 percent of their incomes on goods and items that are not essential needs, an annualized 2.3 trillion dollars from spending tracked in 2015 (1) (bloombergview.com). This means making frequent choices about purchases is intrinsic to our American way-of-life and that the potential for impact is high.

Manufacturing has the largest multiplying effect in the US economy compared to all other sectors, creating more than seven additional jobs per one manufacturing job (2) (themanufacturinginstitute.org). And the jobs created by manufacturing are good, highly paid, skilled jobs. It is no surprise then that decades of manufacturing offshore have negatively impacted our economy and environment. Companies are beginning to reconsider their manufacturing locations and how that influences bottom line and quality. Creating greater demand through conscientious purchasing can potentially accelerate this shift in some industries. It is estimated that if about 90 percent of Americans reallocated one dollar per day, spending one dollar less on foreign-made goods, and one dollar more on American-made goods, after a year, this could add $109.5 billion to the American economy, which equates to about 2,737,500 new jobs paying $40,000 per year (3) (madeinusa.org)

The purpose of this IPRO project team is to investigate the question:How might we better connect Americans to products that are made-in-USA? During the first two weeks, the IPRO team will develop a broad view of current American consumer spending in relation to products made in the US vs those that are imported, trends in American jobs in various sectors, and environmental impact associated with where products are made and purchased. This research will also investigate current strategies and tactics for informing consumers about which products are made in the USA, and how such designations, labeling, etc. are determined and validated and by which organizations. Based on insights from the initial research phase, during the remaining six weeks the IPRO team will brainstorm and prototype concepts that can be tested to validate how they might better support consumer decision making and behavior that connects consumers with American products and companies.

References:
  1. Whitehouse, Mark. "Americans Spend More on Stuff They Don't Need." BloombergView.com. 11_12_2015.
  2. "Number of Jobs Supported by Manufacturing in Other Industries." Facts About Manufacturing. The Manufacturing Institute updated 2014.
  3. "Are You Ready for the Breakdown?" madeinusa.org.
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497-306: Innovating Education at Chicago Quest High School via STEM, Logistics, Arts, Robotics & Leadership

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Chicago Quest High School is located two blocks from the North/Clybourn CTA Redline stop in Lincoln Park (http://www.chicagoquest.org/). Originally modeled after the Institute of Play, a non-for-profit organization in New York City that was opened as Quest to Learn in 2009, the school was tagged as the school for digital kids. In 2011, Chicago Quest was created to bring the Quest to Learn Model to Chicago as a campus of the Chicago International Charter School (CICS). The new school started as a project-based game-like learning middle school and later added the high school.

When first started with instructors who understood the Quest to Learn model, students were very engaged. The learning by doing concept had more project based curriculum that used verbal communication and demonstrated how to solve complex problems using the game-like learning methodology. However, due to several changes in the administration, the release of several instructors who understood the Quest to Learn model, and the management company (Civitas) and CICS wanting to change to a more traditional education environment, the school no longer follows the program that was initially started. This has resulted in:
  1. Chicago Quest losing its MacArthur Foundation Grant;
  2. the middle school being put on the CPS academic watch list due to its school quality rating;
  3. CICS board voting to close the middle school; and
  4. parents and students rejecting the proposed model.
Given the above developments, the range of potential objectives of this IPRO project are:
  1. create a recruitment package to increase enrollment while keeping a more attractive curriculum that students, parents, and teachers agree on;
  2. introduce a Science, Technology, Engineering, Logistics, Leadership, Arts and Robotics (STELLAR) educational model to the institution;
  3. restructure the curriculum so that it aligns with university standards and 21st century learning models;
  4. research funding opportunities; and
  5. create collaborative partnerships.
We envision that the summer 2016 IPRO team can begin to advance through three steps, although the work of the team may lay the foundation for a subsequent IPRO team project in fall 2016. The three tasks are summarized here:
  1. Task One: Organize structured conversations with Chicago Quest High School stakeholders in order to develop first-hand knowledge and perspectives on the context for developing, demonstrating and implementing the STELLAR initiative. Primary stakeholders include students, parents, teachers and administrators. to get firsthand knowledge of problem.
  2. Task Two: Collaborate with stakeholders to draft a strategic plan for reaching the objectives listed above. This may include developing prototypes of curriculum and course modules that offer an integrated approach to demonstrating and validating the STELLAR initiative.
  3. Task Three: Create one or more opportunities to introduce Chicago Quest students to the university experience. This may include (a) exposure to the range of degree pursuits, (b) introduction to the rigor of college learning/life, and (c) overview of the steps and milestones that guide the students toward building a portfolio of experience and accomplishment leading to a university opportunity.
This IPRO project is also planned to continue for fall 2016 in order to follow through on the work of the summer team, and thus providing enough time to further tackle the tasks outlined above and advance the project goals in collaboration with the leadership, teachers and students of Chicago Quest High School.return to top

497-308: Urban Activators: Insert + Deploy + Engage

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:35 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Monica Chadha (ARCH) (mchadha1@iit.edu) and Michael Newman (ARCH)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

In marketing and sales, social media and technology have changed how businesses operate. For example, wireless credit card readers such as Square allow entrepreneurs, retailers, businesses and others to operate without traditional infrastructure. This and other services provide a flexibility and freedom for businesses to develop something with minimal capital investment. This strategy has proven successful and has the ability to be deployed anywhere. What is the physical equivalent to Square?

The Mobile Activator is the physical equivalent of Square and seeks to provoke economic development by providing an armature that allows for the transaction of commerce, generates activity and grows to permanence over time. While the residential market continues to grow in south side neighborhoods there is a lag in the development of commercial corridors. The Mobile Activator helps to jump-start this development. This armature can shift and grow from street corner to vacant property to empty storefront as a precursor to longer term investments. Our community partners serve as the interconnective tissue.

The Mobile Activator is an easily deployable, affordable, interconnected and replicable system that provides a sense of place that is being conceived in tandem with existing relationships in Bronzeville, Englewood and Chatham. The process will include input from the community in its development and the end product will offer a viable opportunity for a scaled approach to reinvestment. Project partners include the Greater Englewood Community Development Corporation, EnglewoodBlue Business Accelerator, Bronzeville Retail Initiative and Chatham Development Corporation.

The IPRO team will look at the broader issues around activating the commercial corridors in emerging neighborhoods. It will create/develop a portable prototype for activating a vacant storefront and vacant lot. This model will be priced and designed as a replicable prototype. The team will address the technical, marketing and physical aspects of the project. The team will have the opportunity to participate in a community revitalization project, collaborate with organizations outside of class and create a visual and physical example that reflects a long-term strategic plan.

Students do not often have the opportunity to engage with communities outside the school and develop partnerships. This IPRO project aims to create a model for projects that are based on the needs identified locally by community organizations and residents. The resulting projects should be able to be supported by the community; and the project should not end or cease to exist once the students step away

Through this IPRO project, students will:
  1. Expand on their abilities to work together as an interprofessional team. The team will develop roles for each member, share in leadership and work cohesively together.
  2. The nature of the project will allow students to apply both creative and critical thinking to solve the problem of stimulating economic development in the areas.
  3. Team members will learn and extend on their abilities to communicate their ideas. Through both public presentation and review, the team will refine its communication effectiveness.
  4. The team will be responsible for producing a small-scale intervention or event engagement before the end of the summer. This includes the planning and management of the tasks and schedule for accomplishing this result.
  5. The team's effort and accomplishment is expected to be innovative and have an impact on the communities in which the projects lie.
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497-311: Social Innovation for Community Wealth Building (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:15 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Amanda Geppert (ID) (amandageppert@gmail.com) and and Maryam Heidaripour (ID) (maryam@id.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

CANCELLED FOR SUMMER 2016

Neighborhoods need to continually rethink their approach to economic development and community development, taking into account many factors that influence the interaction between and among government, businesses, community organizations, and residents.

Working in small teams, this IPRO section uses a structured approach to social innovation to explore the following lines of inquiry:
  1. What is community wealth?
  2. How is community wealth built in Chicago communities? Who is involved and who is excluded?
  3. What community assets can be leveraged to create more stable, equitable and resilient local economies?
  4. How can we think differently about community assets to create new social and economic value for Chicago residents and stakeholders?
The teams will conduct secondary and primary research (intercept and expert interviews, participant observation), engaging with Chicago residents and stakeholders throughout the semester. The teams will learn how to apply a variety of design methods to their data to analyze (asset mapping, stakeholder mapping, opportunity maps, value webs, user journey maps) and synthesize (rapid prototyping) findings to create a social innovation that builds community wealth. Solutions must be desirable for users, technologically feasible and economically viable.

Students who join this IPRO section should be prepared for an immersive learning experience, as they will engage in iterative fieldwork in a variety of off-campus contexts. There will be two juried critiques of the teams' midterm review (problem framing with data) and final presentation (proposed solution including prototype). During the semester, the teams will:
  1. Apply design thinking skills and methods to better understand and address complex socio-economic problems;
  2. Develop a nuanced theoretical understanding of social innovation;
  3. Develop a basic understanding of community-based participatory research principles; and
  4. Strengthen qualitative research skills.
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497-313: Social and Economic Development Challenges in Chinatown: Assessing Change in a Transitioning Urban Neighborhood (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session A (May 23 to July 2) Tuesdays/Thursdays from 9:00 am to 12:10 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Rebecca Steffenson (Social Sciences) (rsteffe1@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The Chicago Chinatown neighborhood is undergoing significant demographic change. The Chinese population is the fastest growing immigrant community in Chicago and new arrivals continue to choose Chinatown as their first port of entry. Growth is good, but it can present challenges for neighborhoods. Competition for resources between old and new residents and independent businesses and retail chains often affect transitioning neighborhoods. As the population has grown, the physical boundaries of the Chinatown have changed. So has the geographic distribution of new community assets, with private investment pouring into the north end of the neighborhood. The same is true of public development projects including new parks and a new library which have replaced old sites on the south end of the neighborhood. The shifting geographic center of the community raises questions about the economic development of the old Chinatown and the social cohesion of the neighborhood as a whole.

This IPRO project will explore the shifting needs of the Chinatown community with the aim of developing future social and economic development strategies. This will be a phase zero project to lay a foundation for future work, and thus it focuses on problem definition and planning. Students will identify and engage stakeholders, inventory assets, and assess Chinatown strengths, opportunities, weaknesses, and threats. The group will investigate the possibility of developing technology applications that can expand the visibility and accessibility of the neighborhood.

The IPRO team will learn and draw upon applied research approaches used in community and economic planning processes. These approaches include needs assessment, stakeholder analysis and strategic planning designed to evaluate community needs and stakeholder interest and influence. Likely steps include data analysis, stakeholder interviews, field observations and focus groups. Much of the project will involve fieldwork on-site in Chinatown. return to top

497-314: Microgrids: Design for Socially Innovative, Socio-Technical Systems with and for Communities

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 7:25 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Amanda Geppert (ID) (amandageppert@gmail.com) and Peter Hodges (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

CANCELLED FOR SUMMER 2016

Microgrids diversify the electric grid, creating locally generated and stored energy. Globally, many types of organizations are looking to create innovative microgrid approaches, numbering among them is U.S. energy utility company ComEd. ComEd has been working with Illinois Tech to bring this technology to the Bronzeville neighborhood, and, pending legislative approval, may receive significant funding to expand efforts in other Chicago communities.

Although ComEd microgrids are aimed at critical infrastructure resiliency, the general introduction of microgrids (individual and community) will impact the day-to-day lives of individuals and communities by changing electricity pricing and creating new kinds of economic models. From the perspective of local residents and stakeholders there are many important questions to consider about the design and implementation of these new systems and the potential implications choices have for the neighborhood. For instance:
  1. Where will microgrids be located?
  2. What will be the ownership model (centralized, community, or ?)
  3. How will they generate and store energy?
  4. What kinds of information will systems collect and/or illuminate?
  5. Who will own that information?
  6. Will microgrids create new kinds of value for the community (social, economic, political, etc.); if so, for whom, how, and to what end?
  7. What kinds of advantages and disadvantages result from the affordances created by microgrid technology?
  8. How might microgrids affect community capacity and sustainability (social, ecological and economic)?
The IPRO team will conduct secondary and primary research (intercept and expert interviews, participant observation), engaging with Bronzeville residents and stakeholders throughout the semester. The team will learn how to apply a variety of design methods to their data to analyze (asset mapping, value webs, user journeys, systems diagramming, basic economic analysis, decision matrices) and synthesize (rapid prototyping) findings to create a socio-technical systems design that is guided by social innovation principles that aim to build community wealth. Solutions developed by the team must be desirable for users, technologically feasible and economically viable.

The team members should be prepared for an immersive learning experience, as they will engage in iterative fieldwork in a variety of off-campus contexts. There will be two juried critiques during the semester: midterm progress review presentation (problem framing with data) and final presentation (proposed solution including prototype).

Students in this course will:
  1. Apply design thinking skills and methods to better understand and address problems situated in complex socio-technical systems;
  2. Develop a nuanced theoretical understanding of social innovation;
  3. Develop a basic understanding of systems and complexity; and
  4. Strengthen qualitative research skills.
Working in small, interdisciplinary teams, students will learn to apply a structured approach to social innovation for socio-technical systems that takes into account the many factors that could influence the interactions between and among community residents and community organizations, businesses, and government, relative to the introduction of microgrids and associated technologies. return to top

497-315: Global Human Centered Design: An IPRO Study Abroad Experience

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Meeting Days/Time:

This special six-week IPRO is from June 13 to July 22 WITHIN Session B (See note below)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Douglas Wills (ID) (wills.douglas@gmail.com) in collaboration with Hanna Korel (ID), Emilia Klimiuk (ID), Omar Khalil (ChBE) and Jenni Schneiderman (ID Grad Student) in collaboration with Caiti Goddard (University for Peace, Costa Rica)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Presentation Video:

Click to View

Description:

CANCELLED FOR SUMMER 2016 -- PLANNING FOR SUMMER 2017

If you are interested in learning more and joining this special project, Doug Wills needs to hear from you by May 6 in order to make arrangements.

SPECIAL NOTES:
  1. This special six-week IPRO is from June 13 to July 22 which is WITHIN the standard eight-week Session B. As noted further below, the first and last two weeks of this special six-week IPRO are in Chicago, with the team meeting on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:00 am to 12:10 pm in the Idea Shop.
  2. This IPRO is by permit only. All interested students will be considered. In addition, we welcome those those students who have undertaken research, developed prototypes or been involved in projects that address the needs of people in developing countries or have a keen interest in doing so. Please contact Doug Wills (wills.douglas@gmail.com to inquire about being accepted in this IPRO section.
This IPRO project offers an opportunity for students to (a) develop in-country experience of observation and identification of problems/needs that lead to insights as well as (b) follow-through with in-country development, testing and feedback of prototypes that can lead to the iteration of concepts, which can ultimately generate meaningful social impact. There is also an important opportunity to provide a richer orientation and contextual component so that the students will be aware of the broader aspects when designing products, services and systems. Orientation could include historical, political/geo-political, existing infrastructure, cultural, religious, humility, power dynamics, economic, social, ethical, and environmental considerations, with an emphasis on sustainability.

This pilot Global Human Centered Design IPRO course connects and enables IIT innovators, namely, current students, faculty and alumni networks around the world, with the aim of generating meaningful social impact through user-centered design. The course is being offered to students with a background or keen interest in researching or developing concepts to improve the lives of people in developing countries. Students have the opportunity to travel abroad and conduct user research and field-testing of prototypes during the course, engaging with intended users and stakeholders in collaboration with an IPRO instructor, Institute of Design graduate student, local IIT alumni and/or a local educational institution. IIT is partnering with the University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica in the context of a broader Latin American experience. UPEACE will provide in-country support and guidance as well as assist in the identification and selection of challenges for IIT students to work on.

WEEKS 1-2 (June 13 to June 24) at IIT in Chicago: Orientation, team formation, problem/concept selection, framing, secondary research, concept/prototype development and research/activity planning.

WEEKS 3-4 (June 27 to July 8) at University for Peace, Costa Rica: In-country field research and prototype testing with the University For Peace

WEEKS 5-6 (July 11 to July 22) at IIT in Chicago: Research analysis/synthesis, prototype refinement, project reflection and documentation.

Members of this IPRO team will also participate in the summer IPRO Day event on July 29.

This special IPRO Study Abroad experience will foster a collaborative spirit among IIT students and those in-country, before the trip, during and for the long term. Students will obtain feedback and insights that lead to the development, refinement and further prototyping of their concepts. There will be iteration upon return to IIT and follow-up through the next Global Challenges IPRO class in Chicago. The in-country experience gives students the opportunity to observe various settings where they can identify other challenges that merit exploration via the next Global Challenges IPRO class in Chicago. This is particularly important for subsequent IPRO classes because the creation of new ideas can be informed early on by (a) needs discovered in-country and (b) the experts in-country who can be a resource during the semester before concepts/prototypes are selected.

Additional Information about University for Peace: The vision of the University for Peace is to be a forward-thinking, transformational and inspirational educational institution dedicated to the goals of quality teaching, research and service for serving humanity in building a peaceful world. Established as a Treaty Organization with its own Charter in an International Agreement adopted by the [United Nations] General Assembly in resolution 35/55 of 5 December 1980, the University for Peace has the mission:
    to provide humanity with an international institution of higher education for peace and with the aim of promoting among all human beings the spirit of understanding, tolerance and peaceful coexistence, to stimulate cooperation among peoples and to help lessen obstacles and threats to world peace and progress, in keeping with the noble aspirations proclaimed in the Charter of the United Nations.
This IPRO is by permit only. All interested students will be considered. In addition, we welcome those those students who have undertaken research, developed prototypes or been involved in projects that address the needs of people in developing countries or have a keen interest in doing so. Please contact Doug Wills (wills.douglas@gmail.com to inquire about being accepted in this IPRO section. We need to hear from interested students by May 6 in order to make arrangements.return to top

497-318: Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Summer Workshop

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation and Other Partner Organizations TBD

Faculty:

Bo Rodda (ID) (rodda.bo@gmail.com) and Other Faculty TBD

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

CANCELLED FOR SUMMER 2016 -- PLANNING FOR SUMMER 2017

For summer 2016, we are piloting a summer big data science initiative. This is modeled after IPRO 397-400 offered in fall and spring entitled Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Challenge. The main difference is that this experience is designed to include selected STEM-oriented high school students and data science graduate students.

The goal of this IPRO project is to create a vertically-integrated approach to introducing students to big data science methods and their practical application by integrating Illinois Tech undergraduates enrolled in the IPRO class with data science graduate students and selected students from Chicago-area high schools with a STEM orientation. The contextual focus is on accessing and understanding large government data sets to identify interesting insights and trends that can lead to breakthrough thinking about addressing challenges of living in the urban environment.

The summer session offers the opportunity to engage students and teachers from two or three high schools with Illinois Tech undergraduates, graduate students and faculty researchers in open-ended projects focused to big data science themes in the urban context. For summer 2016, we will continue the theme of public safety in the urban environment that draws upon City of Chicago and other open government data sets. In addition, in order to engage young people, the problem-solving focus of the integrated high school and Illinois Tech student teams will be to design new solutions and develop policies related to problems that young people care about in the realm of data-rich lifestyle challenges they face, e.g., safety, health, job training and placement, purchase decision making, sports and entertainment, etc. The goal is to achieve outcomes that demonstrate how data science can help create and design new services, policies and strategies.

The initial focus will be the contemporary challenge areas identified above. However, additional themes may be identified and integrated as well, in order to be flexible and responsive to opportunities that may arise from students, faculty, the community, industry and other stakeholders.

The overall summer 2016 big data science IPRO experience will have the character of a workshop with on the order of 20 participants who are assigned to a themed big data community (based in part on their rank-ordering of theme preferences). Participants will be organized in agile work teams of no more than five students. Each team cohort will be represented by: high school students, Illinois Tech undergraduates from different degree programs and Illinois Tech graduate students from our data science and other related degree programs.

The overall workshop will be guided by a teaching team comprised of Illinois Tech faculty members and high school teachers. Ideally, the Illinois Tech faculty members will include those with expertise in data science and analytics (representing technical feasibility), design methods (representing user desirability), and business/entrepreneurship (representing business viability). It is envisioned that the high school teachers may represent mathematics, statistics, science, civics and STEM education fields pertinent to big data challenges.return to top

497-346: Beneficial Use of Commercial Building Air Conditioning Condensate

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:15 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

Air conditioners cool air and in the process water is removed. In virtually all cities where there are humid days the amount of condensate that a typical commercial building produces can be 1000's of gallons. The condensate is non-purified distilled water. In most cases this non-purified distilled water is funneled to the buildings sewer system. This IPRO project will study commercial condensate capture and reuse. The team will evaluate the constraints and benefits of harvesting and recycling condensate in commercial buildings.

Students participated in a Residential air conditioning condensate IPRO in summer of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Student ratings of these IPRO projects were very positive and their results confirmed that air conditioning condensate is a valuable resource currently being wasted. The first three IPRO projects focused on residential condensate.

During these IPRO projects students developed a collection system to document the volume (50 gallons/day) of condensate is generated in a Chicago area four bedroom home during the summer. Students researched the Illinois Plumbing Code and learned the State of Illinois restricts the use of water used within a building to only water provided by a public utility. This Illinois regulation restricts the use of condensate to exterior uses only. During the research, the teams learned that Australia, Arizona and New Mexico allow the use of condensate inside buildings in non-potable applications like flushing toilets. There is a gap in our understanding of why Illinois has a restriction, so this will be looked at in the Summer 2016 IPRO. The team will also do further research regarding uses of condensate in other states and countries. Additionally previous research indicated there is minimal commercial condensate information regarding the volume of condensate generated and few if any systems to capture it and recycle it for non-drinking applications.

This summer 2016 IPRO will focus on Commercial buildings. The Chicago Tribune has reported that water is a dwindling resource and aggressive conservation is required. This project is responsive to the call for conservation and the trend toward identifying, adopting and diffusing "GREEN" best practices and behavior. The project offers a solution to local water rationing regulations that limit irrigation and other uses of water. Students participating in this IPRO project will attempt to justify and develop a viable system, their efforts will demonstrate both the value of condensate and could influence commercial building design. Students will record their findings in a technical paper that will be submitted to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for the 2018 Winter Conference to be held in Chicago.

The IPRO team will be organized in two sub-teams: Commercial Condensate Research and Commercial Condensate Capture/Beneficial Use. The research sub-team will validate the beneficial use of condensate and apply their findings in a sufficient argument to potentially overcome the barriers of Illinois State law. The Condensate Capture/Use sub-team will focus on one or two commercial buildings on the IIT Campus and one commercial building in Chicago. The team will collect commercial condensate data and evaluate possible uses in order to justify and design a system for a commercial building which could be installed in order to use air conditioner condensate for cleaning, landscape, water feature, toilets and other non-drinking purposes. Participating students will produce a technical paper and present their findings to CMAP, Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning the week prior to IPRO Day. In addition, the paper will be submitted to ASHRAE as a technical paper to be presented at their Chicago Winter conference in January 2018. return to top

497-379: Usability & Social Networking with PassLok

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Meeting Days/Time:

Summer Session B (June 6 to July 29) Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:15 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

CANCELLED FOR SUMMER 2016

In the summer of 2013, Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA and other agencies had engaged in warrantless, large-scale surveillance of American citizens and foreign nationals. The need to use strong encryption in personal communications is keenly felt by many, but unfortunately it remains hard to use by common people. PassLok and SeeOnce have been devised to be very easy to use without compromising security. This issue is directly related to the Security theme of Armour College.

An IPRO team conducted a usability study during the Summer 2014 semester. This led to a significantly improved version 2.0 of the PassLok app, but there is still much that can be done.

The objectives for Summer 2016 are the following:
  1. Extend the usability study done in Summer 2014, this time by using resources similar to those of the Usability Lab at IIT's Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, which is not available during the summer.
  2. Engage in a promotional campaign to capture new users and learn what they want from the apps.
  3. Conduct a "penetration study", where security experts (aka. "hackers") try to break their security model, and reveal flaws that need to be fixed.
  4. The above will likely lead to modifications of the code, which will be implemented right away by a third team.
An app featuring a simplified framework has been developed over the last two years. It is called PassLok. Last year, an even simpler app was developed: SeeOnce. Are they simple enough to use or is additional refinement needed? We will determine this by observing users as they use the apps through a carefully designed protocol.At the same time, the value of an app like this depends very much on the network that is created around it. We will study and implement strategies to foster the adoption of PassLok and SeeOnce within Illinois Tech and elsewhere. In order to do this, we will devise instruments such as websites and surveys.

The IPRO team will use a two-pronged approach:
  1. Security apps are famously hard to use, so there will be one team constantly performing usability testing of the different prototypes, supplemented with observation of users as they go about emailing, texting, etc.
  2. The technical team(s) will take the knowledge gathered by the usability team and use it to tailor the user interface and the underlying operation of the programs. Depending on the number of students, there could be as many as three technical teams.
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