IPRO Future Listings for Summer 2014 and Fall 2014

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Summer 2014
IPRO 000
IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SUMMER 2014
IPRO 397-300
Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.)
IPRO 497-358
The SmartHat: A Construction Communications System
IPRO 497-368
Community Engagement Cluster Legacy Projects
IPRO 497-369
Urban Agriculture Innovation at IIT
IPRO 497-370
Urban Activators: Community Storefront -- A Tool for Revitalization
IPRO 497-371
Creating a Reliable Sports Players' Statistical Performance Evaluation Methodology
IPRO 497-372
Developing a Comparative Analysis of Compost and Mulch in the Context of Illinois Environmental Regulations
IPRO 497-373
Supermarket Food Service Life Style Experience Design
IPRO 497-374
CANCELLED -- Depave/Repave IIT
IPRO 497-375
Developing a User-Friendly, Compact and Effective Method for Terminating Multiple Magnet Wire Bundles for Electrical Industry Applications
IPRO 497-376
Achieving Work/Life Balance in the Digital Age
IPRO 497-377
Understanding the Millenial in the Workplace
IPRO 497-378
Developing Workspace Innovation Concepts that Stimulate Cross-Functional Collaboration
IPRO 497-379
PassLok: User-Friendly Privacy Apps for the Web

Summer 2014

000: IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SUMMER 2014

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

All summer IPRO sections are scheduled for Session B which begins June 2 and concludes July 26.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Appropriate Disciplines:

Description:

Summer 2014 IPRO sections will be listed here by the end of March. At the same time, the IPRO sections will be listed under the subject "Interprofessional Project" by the registrar in the MyIIT portal for registration. All summer IPRO sections are scheduled for Session B which begins June 2 and concludes July 26.

We encourage students contemplating taking a summer IPRO course to come to the IPRO Registration Fair in the MTCC Bridge on Tuesday, April 1, between 12 noon and 5 pm to meet IPRO instructors and learn more about projects being offered.

We are offering the following IPRO options for summer 2014:

One IPRO 397-xxx section will be offered for students taking their first IPRO course.

On the order of 10 traditional IPRO 497-3xx sections with 10 to 12 students each will be offered for students taking either their first or second IPRO course.

No themed cluster sections are being offered for summer 2014, although projects that evolved from the spring 2014 themed clusters may be offered as IPRO 497-3xx sections.

IPRO sections are set up with capacity limits and limits on the number of students from the majors that are expected to be most attracted to a specific IPRO project. If you are unable to register because the section is closed or there is any other restriction, you are urged to consider other IPRO sections that interest you. You may also add yourself to the wait list for a closed IPRO section. Students who are waitlisted will be reviewed by the IPRO Program staff and instructor if there is an opportunity to add students to a given IPRO section.

Questions about choosing an IPRO project and IPRO registration can be directed to Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu).

397-300: Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.)

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B which begins on June 2 and concludes on July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu)tors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with a focus on digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with a focus on product design) or IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower. For summer 2014, only IPRO 397-300 is being offered in Session B beginning June 2 and concluding July 26.

Interprofessional by Design introduces students to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO projects conceived by students that became regular IPRO team projects include: Renovation of the Ramova Theatre, MORE Life, Simply Park, Language Link, Aging in Place, LegoArt, Enabling Blind Sailors to Sail Independently, Bridging the Generations via Digital+Physical Gaming, and IIT Pride: Developing Strategies for Student Engagement at Athletic Events.

Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).

497-358: The SmartHat: A Construction Communications System

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Robert Babbin

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmckinn5@iit.edu or naoibri@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

This IPRO project continues the spring 2014 IPRO 358 work in order to further develop the Smart Hat to the next stage-- from research and conceptual prototypes to more enhanced, functional prototypes and continued engagement with component sources and technologies, supports, etc.

The objective of the project is to integrate current smart phone, Building Information Modeling (BIM) and augmented reality technology, etc. to the construction site via the safety helmet to establish a safer and more productive construction communication and management process. Some of our research and reference material to date can be found at http://ipro358.wordpress.com/.

Through the eight-week summer session, the IPRO team will evaluate the research and progress of the spring semester and follow that team's recommended next steps to refine the SmartHat. This is likely to include developing the details and interface between the hard hat and the electronic components -- projector, recorder, viewing device, sensors, etc. In addition, the team will challenge the material, wearable and functional decisions made by the spring IPRO 358 team and derive at least one alternative approach to the SmartHat. The summer team will also establish the fabrication cost of the working model(s) and develop and advance the SmartHat branding. In addition to the typical IPRO deliverables, the objective is to have at least one well-refined, working prototype that can be promoted to investors, manufacturers, etc.

497-368: Community Engagement Cluster Legacy Projects

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Joseph Clair (ARCH) (joseph@josephclair.com), Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com) and William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Professional & Technical Communication, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

There are two or three IPRO team topics under the umbrella of this community engagement IPRO section that represent legacy projects that have evolved from the spring 2014 community engagement IPRO activities, as summarized below:

PROJECTING A REVITALIZED BRONZEVILLE

The overall purpose of this IPRO project is to identify how to take an innovative community revitalization idea and turn it into a self-sustaining program.

The Bronzeville team of the 2013-2014 Community Engagement cluster identified important historical nodes as a key to community revitalization (1st semester), then honed in on a specific idea to take one of the historic buildings of the community - The Forum - and design an event around "projection bombing" (the use of multi-media displays directly onto the surface of a building) to draw attention to the present and future possibilities. This summer, IPRO 375 will demonstrate the viability of the concept by planning and executing the event, and more importantly, will identify the opportunities to deliver similar events at the same site and other historic sites around Bronzeville. The key will be to establish partnerships and identify regular revenue streams associated with the events so that each successful implementation can beget another "projection bombing" event.

The team will receive a project timeline and 50 percent of a design for a "projection bombing" event from the Spring IPRO team. The Summer IPRO team will work with the IIT Office of Community Affairs to engage new partners in the event, and undertake any additional fundraising necessary to bring the event to fruition.

More importantly, while these steps are happening, the Summer IPRO team will: (1) Identify the priority order for other similar events given the constraints of the existing format; (2) Identify limitations on the execution of the event at each of the possible locations; (3) Review the current budget for the event and identify areas for potential cost savings as the project is scaled up from one to many events; (4) Create a three-year plan for executing the events; (5) Create the basic business model for building on one event to create future events; (6) Predict the quantifiable community development benefits that should accrue from the event and create a report template that can be used to determine the success of the event and potential for replication.

THE 95TH STREET CORRIDOR TO THE WORLD PROJECT

The 95th Street Corridor to the World Project serves to identify and address the needs of the nearby Princeton Park community and the West Chesterfield community association that are located west and east of the 95th & the Dan Ryan Redline Station. As part of the larger Roseland community, Princeton Park is named for a 1944 development that replaced farmland with a park surrounded by houses. West Chesterfield conversely is a well-established community organization that has been in existence for several years. Critical relationships have been established with various neighborhood organizations that allow unfettered contact with real stakeholders (community leaders, religious organizations, residents, and business owners). The IPRO team will meet these stakeholders, identify their needs, respond to their needs, and present results to them.

Princeton Park is a five-block by seven-block Chicago neighborhood that remains extremely walk-friendly and borders the 95th street stop of the CTA Red Line. West Chesterfield borders the west side of the CTA Red Line to King Drive from 95th Street to 87th Street. The CTA stop allows the bulk of the neighborhood to be considered transit-oriented which provides unique development opportunities that other neighborhoods do not have. Another unique amenity is the planned redevelopment of the 95th Street Redline Stop that will be built across 95th Street and an existing pedestrian bridge connecting school children to their elementary school east of the Dan Ryan.

Projects undertaken by previous IPRO teams under the concept of a Princeton Park Collaborative have included the adaptive reuse of a previous church into a community center and the design of a 70-unit assisted senior living facility. The community center board is currently using the information provided by the current IPRO team in its search for funding. The work of the team has included the development of needed programs; code and zoning analysis; construction and operating budgets; schematic architectural and systems design; and a needs assessment conducted of the community. Through the work of this IPRO team, the Corridor to the World Project is destined to leave a long-lasting impact on this community interested in maintaining its identity and providing for its residents.

497-369: Urban Agriculture Innovation at IIT

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Rodger Cooley (jrojet@yahoo.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

The health and well being of individuals, communities and environments in the United States are challenged and compromised by the dominant industrial food system. Obesity, diabetes and other diet related diseases, waste of organic nutrients, massive water pollution, and excessive green houses gasses are linked to how food is produced, harvested, distributed, processed, marketed, prepared and consumed. The vast majority of fresh produce travels over 1200 miles to get to Chicago. Produce is harvested early before it is at peak ripeness, processed at multiple steps and retailed 7-10 days after picking. This leads to a loss of nutritional value and taste all along the chain before it consumed. Because of the standardization of fruit and vegetable production, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization calculated 75 percent of crop diversity has been lost since 1900. A loss of diversity and genetics never researched for qualities such as disease and pest resistance, drought tolerance, and nutritional benefits. There are many other urban and market trends and motivating factors that have stimulated the urban agriculture movement.

Since its inception in the Spring of 2012 as IPRO 314, UFarmIIT has been adding elements and partners to address the problems of the dominant food system using the opportunities provided by urban agriculture. UFarmIIT is now a student farm, community garden and student organization. UFarmIIT is providing IIT for urban agriculture and is providing hands on learning opportunities for students.

Similar projects at other universities have started at this basic level and grew over time to become robust programs providing diverse educational opportunities and career pathways for students; incorporating many departments through research, curriculum, and projects; generating revenue through sales, grants and donations; providing access to healthy produce for local communities; and positive attention and differentiation for the universities.

Access to safe healthy fresh food remains an issue in Bronzeville and the immediate areas surrounding IIT. The IIT campus and Bronzeville have underutilized land and wasted green spaces. Student interest continues to grow in urban agriculture and in many of the related issues such as addressing storm water, growing trees for the campus and community, supplying native habitat, improving nutrition and creating living laboratories, are all opportunities for an urban agriculture program to explore.

Since 2012, the IPRO has partnered with IIT Facilities to reuse wood chips from fallen trees on campus, provide water to the site, develop a site for bees, and secure a space for future aquaponics systems; the ARCH First Year studio to design, build and install innovative “living” fence panels; the UFarmIIT student group to provides space for alumni, students, staff and faculty for personal garden plots; the St. James Church’s Food Pantry to provide multiple deliveries of surplus produce; the Biology Department Labs for space to grow mushrooms. Other partnerships and activities in development include building out and launching an aquaponics system on campus; furthering work on an remote sensor system to wirelessly monitor conditions on the farm; working with IFSH to help develop safe handling guidelines for fresh produce and value added products; launching a tree nursery with Facilities; providing space for learning projects for the Boeing Scholars program; and assisting local elementary, middle and high schools with their own gardening programs.

The Summer 2014 IPRO will focus on three projects: (1) Detailing the plan for an Urban Agriculture Program at IIT to provide opportunities for students, staff and faculty to use expanding urban agriculture on IIT's campus and the larger neighborhood; (2) Continue work on remote sensor system to track and monitor then provide real-time notifications of the growing conditions on the farm as well as at the new aquaponics facility; and (3) Continue progress on developing aquaponics system and space in Tech Park Central Room BB11.

The Summer 2014 IPRO will be tasked with solidifying the ideas, research and feedback from previous semesters into a coherent plan and proposal for instituting a dynamic urban agriculture program on IIT's campus that is actively engaged with the Bronzeville community. Students will field test their draft proposals by getting feedback from stakeholders through out the semester.

Students will be also able to select from the following hands on projects to focus on more selectively on over the summer session including remote sensor hardware and software, and furthering progress on developing aquaponic systems on campus.

The summer 2014 IPRO will organize into teams to focus on different aspects of the urban agriculture program plan:

1. IIT Urban Agriculture Vision: Team will pull together previous research and outreach to describe, illustrate and explain the program involving physical elements (UFarmIIT, 30th St/State St, Bee hives, Aquaponics, Composting), curriculum development (Minor, Certificate, Internships), and the Bronzeville community (IIT Community Relations, local organizations, schools and gardens). The team will need to make an easily understood and attractive set of communication materials. Team with gather feed back from stakeholders in the urban agriculture plan.

2. Technology: Team will continue work on aquaponics, embedded onsite sensors, calculating alternative energy needs.

3. Aquaponics: Using learning from the system built and research from the Spring ’14 semester, students will move to building and installing a system in the newly acquired space in Tech Central BB11. Students will partner with the remote sensor team as well.

The first week will involve team-building activities to gain an understanding of each of the team members’ skills, knowledge and attitudes. Discussions will be held on mutual expectations for team members and values for each team.

Teams will develop and present a draft project management plan for the summer semester in the first session of the second week. To help manage this plan, teams will post weekly updates to an existing blog. Teams will be required to set up a communication method accessible for all members. There will be regular full IPRO meetings to ensure all students are engaged and connected to the rest of the IPRO’s projects and process.

As in previous semesters, students will address the ethics component of the project by developing an appreciation for relevant food system issues and undertake small group projects, researching and presenting back to the entire IPRO. Students also will be led through a Dismantling-Racism and Cultural Competency training session to elevate student awareness of the context of working with the communities surrounding IIT and inequities in the current food system.

497-370: Urban Activators: Community Storefront -- A Tool for Revitalization

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

In collaboration with Bronzeville Retail Alliance, 51st Street Business Alliance, Urban Partnership Bank, Alderman Pat Dowell's 3rd Ward Office, Urban Juncture Foundation, Friends of the Forum, Metropolitan Planning Council and IIT Office of Community Affairs & Outreach

Faculty:

Monica Chadha (ARCH) (mchadha1@iit.edu) and Betsy Williams (ARCH) (ewillia9@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Electrical Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

Traditionally, development in neighborhoods has occurred through a long term planning process. These efforts take several years and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to complete. The recommendations from these plans are costly and it is difficult to evaluate the success of the work until it has been actualized. This has been a problematic approach due to its length of time and costs. In our current economic context it is difficult to even justify some of the long term planning efforts without the ability to measure its possibility for success.

A new trend has emerged within communities and neighborhoods. There has been a push to come up with smaller scale, quick and less costly actions that test the ideals of the long term plans. Many call these efforts placemaking. Placemaking is defined as “ a multi-faceted approach to the planning, design and management of public spaces” that includes community feedback to discover the needs and aspirations of the community. This is used to create a common vision that can “quickly evolve into an implementation strategy, beginning with small-scale, do-able improvements that can immediately bring benefits to public spaces and the people who use them” (www.pps.org)Students will have the opportunity to explore these challenges and ultimately create a toolkit and short term activation that can address the larger issues of economic development.

The IPRO team will look at the broader issues around retail and how best practices of retail might need to be altered for emerging neighborhoods. It will focus on economic development opportunities and develop a plan of action for the 51st Street Commercial Corridor in relation to vacant storefronts. This will include creating a portable prototype for activating a commercial storefront as well as develop a toolkit and strategic marketing for small businesses. The team will have the opportunity to participate in a community revitalization project, collaborate with organizations outside of school and create a visual and physical example that reflects a long-term strategic plan.

Students do not often have the opportunity to engage with communities outside the school and develop partnerships. This IPRO project seeks to create a model for projects that are based on the needs identified locally by community organizations and residents. The resulting projects should be able to be supported by the community; the project should not end or cease to exist once the students step away.

The IPRO team will engage with the community, local organizations and city officials to understand local needs and to identify specifics of the project. Through this experience, the team will develop a model for community engagement and a participatory design process. Through the course of the semester students will conduct research, engage in outreach and develop schematic plans, design, build and test a prototype on site and obtain feedback that informs further prototyping and implementation planning.

497-371: Creating a Reliable Sports Players' Statistical Performance Evaluation Methodology

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Information Technology & Management, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

There have been discrepancies in rating baseball players’ performance using the statistical IRA (Individual Ratio Analysis) which has not always been accurate, has biases, and has been detrimental to players’ careers and the team. Sports franchises could benefit from a better way of determining sports players’ performance that is a more accurate reflection of players’ performance and worth to the team.

The objective of this IPRO project is to explore statistical and non-statistical methods of evaluating sports players’ performance that offer more reliable and accurate evaluation of players’ performance and worth to a team. The objective is also to include a performance rating system that takes into account the player’s performance and the team’s performance with a solid statistical basis.

This IPRO project is proposed to span two semesters, summer and fall 2014, requiring collaboration from many fields of study -- engineering, computer science, business, architecture, etc. The IPRO team will take an open-ended approach to addressing the problem statement. The analysis, brainstorming alternatives, statistical analysis, algorithms, prototyping, business model development and planning for this project require a wide range of student backgrounds and interests that can creatively identify and validate potential commercial applications and markets.

497-372: Developing a Comparative Analysis of Compost and Mulch in the Context of Illinois Environmental Regulations

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Kramer Tree Specialists, Inc.

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Applied Mathematics, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Political Science

Description:

Illinois EPA is the Regulatory Authority charged with enforcing the Environmental Law associated with Compost. The Compost Law includes "Leaves" as an environmentally sensitive material. The IPRO sponsor, Kramer Tree Specialists, Inc., provides services to Municipalities to collect shrubbery and leaves and then processes them into Mulch. Mulch is not a regulated Environmental Product. This IPRO project aims to scientifically investigate and document the differences between Leaf Mulch and Compost. Illinois Environmental Law regulates Compost; however, the Law does not apply to Mulch.

As mentioned, and for several decades, Kramer Tree Specialists, Inc. has provided tree and shrubbery clean-up service to Municipal Governments. The trees and shrubbery are ground into mulch and sold. In recent years, Municipal Governments have added leaf clean-up services in the Fall. The Sponsor has thus added leaf clean-up services and subsequently processes the leaves with the wood they collect into a co-mingled wood/leaf mulch or pure leaf mulch. This Project will study leaf mulch, associated processes and product characteristics in order to classify leaf mulch as Mulch or Compost.

The IPRO team will study leaf mulch, associated processes and product characteristics in order to classify leaf mulch as mulch or compost. The Team objective is to investigate leaf mulch and scientifically differentiate the product and process from that of compost. The outcome of the project is a report that documents and illustrates the process of creating leaf mulch and the resulting product characteristics in comparison to the process and characteristics of compost.

The IPRO team will "shadow" sponsor employees and observe and become familiar with the Sponsor’s Wood Mulch and Leaf Mulch processes. A like activity will be completed with a Compost Operation. Students will supplement field investigation with research. Students will create a process flow diagram illustrating the processes for Mulch and Compost. Students will develop methods to measure and record such variables as oxygen, moisture, heat, Ph, material composition, bacteria, incubation time etc. in order to develop a basis for comparative analysis between leaf mulch and compost. The team will evaluate the information and identify differences and, through collaboration with the Sponsor, identify the factors that differentiate leaf mulch from compost. The team will provide progress reports and presentations as well as deliver its final report and presentation to the Sponsor.

497-373: Supermarket Food Service Life Style Experience Design

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Blue Goose Market, St. Charles, Illinois

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

An established community supermarket seeks architectural design and business planning concepts for a proposed food service life style amenity comparable to that available at Whole Foods or other contemporary grocers. The sponsor believes that adding a food service experience element will enhance the supermarket's existing business but before any decision can be made, it seeks ideas from an IPRO team to explore the full impact of such a commitment.

The IPRO team will be involved in the following types of activities during the semester: (1) conduct primary research via visits to Chicago area food stores, including Whole Foods, Mariano's and other venues in order to understand the environment of their food service life style amenity; (2) visit Blue Goose Market in St. Charles and learn first hand from the Owner and Staff their vision of the proposed food service amenity. (3) Obtain drawings of the existing building and site, as well as applicable zoning regulations and building codes for the village of St. Charles and other government entities; (4) develop a project plan; (5) conduct additional research that informs thinking about trends that affect potential for the concept and other business considerations; (6) develop renderings, scale model prototypes, and a preliminary business plan document; (6) present preliminary findings to sponsor and obtain feedback; (7) continue to develop and refine renderings, models and plans based on sponsor and other input; (8) review final work product with Sponsor; etc.

497-374: CANCELLED -- Depave/Repave IIT

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Mary Pat Mattson (ARCH) (mmattso2@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Business, Civil Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Professional & Technical Communication, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Regrettably, this IPRO section had to be cancelled for summer 2014.

This IPRO project addresses an unsustainable IIT Main Campus condition. Currently, 45 percent of the IIT campus is composed of impervious pavement. In order to create a sustainable campus, we need to dramatically reduce the impervious area and promote infiltration of rainwater.

The IPRO team will develop a unique unit paver prototype (pedestrian and vehicular) for the campus, research the state-of-the-art of such systems, research and characterize IIT Main Campus sites and identify two distinct locations that offer potential for initial implementation by developing a plan, designing a system, and demonstrating its effectiveness. This experience will be documented and inform thinking about a long term, phased plan for further reducing impervious pavement on the IIT Main Campus.

497-375: Developing a User-Friendly, Compact and Effective Method for Terminating Multiple Magnet Wire Bundles for Electrical Industry Applications

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:10 to 3:50 pm

Sponsor:

Panduit, Tinley Park, Illinois

Faculty:

Roberto Cammino (MMAE) (cammino@iit.edu) and Sheldon Mostovoy (MMAE) (mostovoy@iit.edu) and other faculty as appropriate

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics

Description:

Magnet wire is extensively used in applications that require current to be routed in coils without producing a short circuit (transformers, inductors, motors, electromagnets etc.). The modern form of magnet wire has been in use since 1911, but despite the maturity of the magnet wire industry, there is not a single solution that is widely accepted as the ideal solution for attaching connectors to magnet wire ends. Magnet wire is made of copper or aluminum with a polymer film insulation (can be polyamide, polyester, polyamide-polyimide etc.) and comes in various shapes and sizes (round, rectangular and square). The insulation coating must meet rigid electrical, thermal, and abrasion specifications and thus, cannot be easily removed from the wire. This creates a problem for joining magnet wires as the conventional approach of removing the insulation jacket of the wire is no longer applicable. The existing methods employed in the industry are the following: (1) Processes that remove the wire coating through mechanical, chemical, laser and thermal means. The stripped wires can now be terminated with conventional means (use of compression lugs, soldering etc.); (2) Using insulation displacement connectors that pierce through the insulation coating and make the electrical joint and (3) Resistance welding connectors on the ends of the magnet wire (this process does not require stripping the coating, it vaporizes the coating to make the electrical connection).

All the existing methods described above have limitations. The mechanical stripping process is labor intensive and produces a lot of debris. The chemical stripping process is labor intensive as well and also, poses a significant health hazard in addition to being non-portable. The laser wire stripping machines in the market today are incredibly expensive (on the order of $200,000 per machine) and require a significant amount of time for staging the wire. The insulation displacement connectors available today can only handle a few strands of magnet wire at a time. The last method, resistance welding, involves the use of machines which are quite large and expensive, but produce a high quality connection. The goal of this project will be to develop a compact resistance welder for terminating multiple magnet wires. The end goal of the project will be a prototype that will utilize technology that can be implemented in a portable and safe package. The variables of the welding process will have to be identified, and modeled to allow different size magnet wires to be welded successfully.

The IPRO team will develop an understanding of current practices for creating terminations for magnet wire bundles in various applications, and to the extent possible, observe those who use the tools and equipment. In addition to other research, this will lead to developing insights about the process parameters and approaches to methods/devices that can create a more compact system that meets technical performance specifications, can be manufactured, and is compact and safe. The IPRO project will advance to the prototyping and testing stage over more than one semester, benefiting from the facilities and expertise available at Panduit and IIT labs.

Registration for this IPRO section is by permit only, and the team size will be on the order of 10 students from various majors. There is a special intellectual property agreement that students joining the team will review and agree to regarding disposition of any concepts that Panduit may wish to develop further.

Interested students should contact Professors Roberto Cammino (cammino@iit.edu), Sheldon Mostovoy (mostovoy@iit.edu) or Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu) to be considered as a member of the Panduit IPRO team.

497-376: Achieving Work/Life Balance in the Digital Age

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 8:50 to 11:30 am (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Michelle Jackson (PSYC) (mijackson.05@gmail.com) in consultation with Mahima Saxena (PSYC)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more organizations are looking at proactive interventions and educational opportunities to aide their workforce in living healthier and less stressed lifestyles. The relationships between individual health and work stress had been demonstrated, along with how work conflict transfers to home life and vice versa. This project will bring a multi-disciplinary viewpoint to the issue of work/life balance and challenge all involved to develop new ideas and strategies to address it.

There are multiple objectives for this IPRO project. For IIT students, this IPRO will bring greater personal awareness regarding their current lifestyles, along with developing a strategy for balancing their future career and life goals. The team will develop a deeper understanding of problem solving applied to daily life beyond what is gained though the user-centered design process. For IIT, this will provide various new avenues for research in the development of work/life balance tools and training programs. This IPRO project also has the potential for providing marketable programs to serve the local business community in aiding their workforce.

This IPRO project will guide team members in learning and applying user-centered design methods. By using psychological observational research methods, e.g. surveys, focus groups, behavioral observations, and primary/secondary research, the IPRO team will advance through the analysis and synthesis process to develop outcome goals that represent avenues for interventions and education programs aimed at employees and their families. Due to the breadth of the subject, a multidisciplinary team ensures that many possible avenues will be explored. Because students will engage outside individuals for research purposes, all students will complete NIH ethics training in research protocols in order to be IRB compliant.

Industrial-Organizational (I-O) Psychology faculty member Mahima Saxena has shown interest in consulting on this IPRO. Ms. Saxena is the instructor for the Seminar in Occupational Health Psychology and has research interests in Work/Life Balance and Interventions.

497-377: Understanding the Millenial in the Workplace

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Daniel Gandara (PSYC) (d.a.gandara@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

This IPRO project will investigate several research questions affecting the Millennial generation in the workplace. (Following Generation X, the Generation Y "Millenial" population roughly spans those born in the early 1980's to the early 2000's.) This generation has been entering the workforce and leaders across industries have experience and challenges connecting with and leading this generation. Some possible research questions include:

What general attitudes do Millennials hold toward working and their careers? How do they differ compared to previous generations?

What motivates Millennials at work? What values do they hold and what do they strive for as a group?

What approaches to training does this generation prefer? Are there any differences in training methods that are more or less effective for this group?

This is only a fraction of the research questions and the full spectrum is limitless. For this summer 2014 IPRO semester, we would solely focus on motivation, goals, and training.

This course would bring several types of value to three stakeholder groups:

For IIT students, it would help them better prepare and understand the organizational influences that will affect their future careers and help them understand how to work with a very diverse set of people; beyond the multidisciplinary approach that the IPRO experience provides, this class will offer students practical insights about how to collaborate with people that hold different generational values and modes of working.

For IIT, this has the potential to produce a great amount of research and dissemination. This area of study is one of the more cutting-edge areas in I/O Psychology.

For professional industry practice, this project could yield better educational or workplace training programs. This could be in the form of seminars for leaders and executives or on-board/orientation training for new employees. Several other organizational interventions can be explored in this process as well.Approach

The main approach would be psychological research in the form of field observation. Surveys, interviews, and observations would be used to collect data for analysis. This would require IRB approval and all students would undergo NIH training to be ethically compliant.

Qualitative and quantitative research analysis tools would be used to make inferences about the data collected.

User-centered design methods from the IPRO 397 Interprofessional by Design workshop course would be learned/applied to generate potential solutions for addressing identified problems. A multidisciplinary team would be required to explore all possible solutions in order to see it come to fruition.

497-378: Developing Workspace Innovation Concepts that Stimulate Cross-Functional Collaboration

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Greenlee, A Textron Company, Rockford, Illinois

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (Institute of Design) (mail@limiashunia.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

Greenlee, located in Rockford, Illinois, 90 miles northwest of Chicago, is an industry leader in professional tools for installing wire and cable. Greenlee’s Product Management and Engineering functions (approx. 40 employees) share approximately 4,200 sf of office space, where each individual employee has his/her own cubicle. The current office design is not conducive to open communication amongst team members, does not foster collaboration and has a somewhat dated appearance. Greenlee's vision is to create a work environment that provides a diverse team with more “open space” that facilitates impromptu meetings, brainstorming and improved collaboration. Greenlee's strategy is to create a more contemporary work environment that supports its efforts to grow the team through hiring college graduates and retaining employees for the long term.

The objectives and approach will be described here in greater detail by March 31. The IPRO team will have the opportunity to visit Greenlee in Rockford to observe how its staff currently work in order to capture insights that might lead to innovative approaches to the workspace. The team will also investigate various contemporary workspaces and environment design strategies that support the collaborative innovation process. This groundwork will help inform the IPRO team as it brainstorms innovative possibilities that could create value for Greenlee and its employees. The IPRO team will have the opportunity to devote a significant amount of its time to mocking up concepts, obtaining feedback, and further iterative prototyping and creation of 3D visualizations that help to reimagine Greenlee's workspace. It is contemplated that at least a couple of trips to Greenlee would be made in order to gather data and present concepts.

497-379: PassLok: User-Friendly Privacy Apps for the Web

Semester:

Summer 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Professional & Technical Information, Psychology

Description:

Earlier this year, Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA and other agencies had engaged in warrantless, large-scale surveillance of American citizens. The need to use strong encryption in personal communications is keenly felt, but unfortunately it remains hard to use by common people. This issue relates directly to the Security theme of Armour College of Engineering and to various other IIT programs.

The plan is to develop native apps and browser extensions for PassLok, a program created by Prof. Ruiz, which implements high security cryptographic primitives on a simple user interface. By the end of the semester, these apps should be available to users.This IPRO project is expected to require one or two semesters.

The IPRO team will be organized to develop and pursue a two-pronged approach:

(1) Security apps are famously hard to use, so there will be one team constantly performing usability testing of the different prototypes, supplemented with observation of users as they go about emailing, texting, etc.

(2) The technical team or teams will take the knowledge gathered by the usability team and use it to refine and customize the user interface and the underlying operation of the program to as many as three platforms: iOS, Android and browser extensions.
Fall 2014
IPRO 000
IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR FALL 2014
IPRO 397-100
Interprofessional by Design: Focus on Digital Service Design (For students taking their first IPRO course.)
IPRO 397-200
Interprofessional by Design: Focus on Product Design (For students taking their first IPRO course.
IPRO 397-300
Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.)
IPRO 397-400
Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.
IPRO 497-01
Community Engagement Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-03
STEM Education Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) education through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-04
Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by developing new venture concepts through user-centered design methods and collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-05
Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by reframing urban system issues through the application of user-centered design methods and collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-302
Investing in New Natural Gas Power Generation
IPRO 497-303
Application of Low-Cost Embedded Processing and Open Source Radio Frequency Technology to Electronic Surveillance
IPRO 497-304
Integration of Process Improvements
IPRO 497-307
Intermodal Container Facility Innovations for the Chicago Area
IPRO 497-313
Refuelable Electric Vehicle
IPRO 497-338
Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments
IPRO 497-346
Sky's the Limit: Retracing the Technological Evolution of Aviation and its Impact on Architecture
IPRO 497-351
PathPass: Opening Doors for People with Disabilities
IPRO 497-354
Developing Sustainable Production Support Systems
IPRO 497-355
Exploring/Integrating Sustainability Concepts for a Power Plant Building Design in the Pacific Northwest
IPRO 497-356
Techno-Business User-Application Trends Analysis of US Motor & Transformer Electricity Consumption
IPRO 497-359
The Simularium: Exploring Opportunities for an Immersive Environment with 3D Visualization at IIT
IPRO 497-363
IIT Pride: Improving Student & University Community Engagement
IPRO 497-371
Creating a Reliable Sports Players' Statistical Performance Evaluation Methodology
IPRO 497-375
Developing a User-Friendly, Compact and Effective Method for Terminating Multiple Magnet Wire Bundles for Electrical Industry Applications

Fall 2014

000: IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR FALL 2014

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Appropriate Disciplines:

Description:

Fall 2014 IPRO sections will be listed here by the end of March. At the same time, the IPRO sections will be listed under the subject "Interprofessional Project" by the registrar in the MyIIT portal for registration.

We encourage students contemplating taking a fall IPRO course to come to the IPRO Registration Fair in the MTCC Bridge on Tuesday, April 1, between 12 noon and 5 pm to meet IPRO instructors and learn more about projects being offered.

We are offering the following IPRO options for fall 2014:

(1) Four IPRO 397-xxx section for students taking their first IPRO course. The days/times are TBD.

(2) Five themed cluster sections are being offered for fall 2014. Themed Cluster IPRO 497-xx sections are organized for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

(3) Traditional IPRO 497-3xx sections with 10 to 12 students each. There may be on the order of 10 to 15 traditional IPRO sections for fall 2014.

IPRO sections are set up with capacity limits and limits on the number of students from the majors that are expected to be most attracted to a specific IPRO project. If you are unable to register because the section is closed or there is any other restriction, you are urged to consider other IPRO sections that interest you. You may also add yourself to the wait list for a closed IPRO section. Students who are waitlisted will be reviewed by the IPRO Program staff and instructor if there is an opportunity to add students to a given IPRO section.

Questions about choosing an IPRO project and IPRO registration can be directed to Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu).

397-100: Interprofessional by Design: Focus on Digital Service Design (For students taking their first IPRO course.)

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Martin Schray (ID), Hanna Korel (ID) and other instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with the theme of digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with the theme of product design), IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option) or IPRO 397-400 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-100 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-100 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON DIGITAL SERVICE DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing digital services. Students will work in small, interdisciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple digital service.

A service is an intangible product we experience in time through multiple touch-points and channels. According to the US department of commerce services account for 80 percent of the US GDP. However, most services are not that special or distinctive. How was the service the last time you flew? This class will focus on improving service experiences through digital technology. An example of a digital service (since we are talking about flying) is the seat selector application that allows you to pick your seats when you book a flight online. Previous to this digital service you would need to accept whatever seat was assigned to you or call and wait for an agent to help you change your seat. This digital service allows you to change your seat at the time of booking.

Digital services are delivered through a combination of apps, websites, texts, and social media. Shazam, Amazon.com, Citibank mobile banking, and Hulu are examples of digital services. We expect that your team will conceive, design conceptually, and test a simple digital service (more like an app on your phone than Amazon.com). The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

We believe that good services will:
  1. Solve for a real user need and address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Use existing, accessible data;
  3. Are intuitive for the user, i.e., you do not need to read a long manual to understand how to use it;
  4. Solve a discreet problem (confirming I have an appointment with my doctor) not a high level problem (helps me with all aspects of my health); and
  5. Do not require a major advance in coding or computer science in order to be viable.
Digital service design naturally leverages the skills of students majoring in such fields as computer science, information technology and management, professional and technical communication, psychology and business, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and web and app development are encouraged to sign up.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are four section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Tuesday evening section from 6:25 to 9:05 pm) and IPRO 397-400 (Wednesday afternoons from 1:50 to 4:30 pm). Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).

397-200: Interprofessional by Design: Focus on Product Design (For students taking their first IPRO course.

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu) and other instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with a focus on digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with a focus on product design), IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option) and IPRO 397-400 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-200: GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-200 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON PRODUCT DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing and developing products. Students will work in small, inter-disciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple product. The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

Projects in this class will be student driven: it will be up to you and your team to identify a need and then develop a product that addresses that need. The final deliverable will be a prototype of your concept that demonstrates the benefits of your solution. You will also be responsible for developing a preliminary business plan for the concept. We will provide the guidance and tools for identifying and developing your product, but we have found that these projects are more successful when they are based on student interest.

We believe that good products will:
  1. Solve for a real user need / address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Have ten parts or less (this is about the level of complexity that your team will be able to prototype);
  3. Can fit through a door (this is a good way to keep the scale of the product small); and
  4. Can be prototyped with the resources and funds available to you (each team will have a $500 budget for your prototype, so you likely cannot use exotic materials).
Product design naturally leverages the skills of engineers (e.g., aerospace, biomedical, electrical, mechanical) and architects, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students who are interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and product development (obviously) are encouraged to sign up.

IPRO 397-xxx is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are four section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Tuesday evening section from 6:25 to 9:05 pm) and IPRO 397-400 (Wednesday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm). Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).

397-300: Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.)

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu) and other instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with a focus on digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with a focus on product design), IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option) or IPRO 397-400 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

Interprofessional by Design introduces students to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO projects conceived by students that became regular IPRO team projects include: Renovation of the Ramova Theatre, MORE Life, Simply Park, Language Link, Aging in Place, LegoArt, Enabling Blind Sailors to Sail Independently, Bridging the Generations via Digital+Physical Gaming, and IIT Pride: Developing Strategies for Student Engagement at Athletic Events.

Students taking the IPRO 397 course have also had the opportunity to work with various community partners on topics that innovate STEM education. This has included Shedd Aquarium (teaching modules related to ecological separation), Erikson Institute (K-3 math education), Chicago Conservation Corps at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (sustainability projects for Chicago Public Schools and other organizations), and Adler Planetarium (brainstorming payload ideas for the Far Horizons balloon launch).

IPRO 397-xxx is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are four section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Tuesday evening section from 6:25 to 9:05 pm) and IPRO 397-400 (Wednesday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).

397-400: Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu) and other instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with a focus on digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with a focus on product design), IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option) or IPRO 397-400 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

Interprofessional by Design introduces students to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO projects conceived by students that became regular IPRO team projects include: Renovation of the Ramova Theatre, MORE Life, Simply Park, Language Link, Aging in Place, LegoArt, Enabling Blind Sailors to Sail Independently, Bridging the Generations via Digital+Physical Gaming, and IIT Pride: Developing Strategies for Student Engagement at Athletic Events.

Students taking the IPRO 397 course have also had the opportunity to work with various community partners on topics that innovate STEM education. This has included Shedd Aquarium (teaching modules related to ecological separation), Erikson Institute (K-3 math education), Chicago Conservation Corps at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (sustainability projects for Chicago Public Schools and other organizations), and Adler Planetarium (brainstorming payload ideas for the Far Horizons balloon launch).

IPRO 397-xxx is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are three section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Tuesday evening section from 6:25 to 9:05 pm) and IPRO 397-400 (Wednesday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm). Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).

497-01: Community Engagement Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Joseph Clair (ARCH) (joseph@josephclair.com) and Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com) in collaboration with William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 40 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2014, there are at least four themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners, and may be expanded to include additional topics by the time the spring semester begins.

The Community Engagement Innovation Cluster may include the following or other new topics that will have traditional IPRO teams on the order of five to ten students from multiple disciplines organized to address them. The following descriptions are from spring 2014 and will be updated to more accurately reflect the purpose of the fall 2014 IPRO teams as well as any new team topics within the cluster:

IPRO 497-01A COMMUNITY ENERGY ON AN URBAN NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE. Urban communities spend significant capital purchasing energy and resources from outside their boundaries, and then send the waste products downstream to other communities. Concurrently, many communities struggle with economic development, trying to keep scarce retail alive. Coupled with a loss of community among residents, this cycle creates instability that further threatens the long-term prospects for the area. One path to reverse this cycle is to focus community resources on local, community energy/water/material systems. When neighbors have to share energy systems that they cooperatively maintain – preferably through local businesses, they shift economic resources from a community drain to a community strength. If this can be solved on the neighborhood level for an urban community, the repercussions are tremendous. The goal of this IPRO project team within the Community Innovation Cluster is to review the infrastructure and flows of energy and water in a typical Chicago neighborhood, and develop a plan to implement community energy programs that decrease the amount of financial resources that leave the community while developing ideas for community businesses that will support the community energy initiative. This will be accomplished by (a) documenting the current infrastructure and model current use patterns, (b) identifying the long-term and short-term financial impact of the current patterns of use, and (c) reviewing and cataloging the energy supply/efficiency tools that could be applied to any community, noting cost, efficacy, scale, and benefit. The team can advance previous work or develop new work based upon their desire for impact.

IPRO 497-01B COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT (BRONZEVILLE). Neighborhoods need to continually rethink their approach to economic development and community development, taking into account many factors that influence the interaction between and among government, businesses and residents. This continuing IPRO project will leverage all of the insight and tools used in the previous semesters, as well as current tools used by other entities in the neighborhood, and apply them to solve community-scale problems in the Bronzeville community. Working with local leaders, the Special Services Agency, IIT Office of Community Affairs, businesses, and residents the team will lead a workshop to gain information from community leaders on Bronzeville's opportunities, identify a current issue in the community that needs addressing, and develop then execute a plan to solve the problem. To accomplish this goal, the team will engage in the following types of activities and tasks: (a) community visits to engage in conversations with members; (b) contact all units of government active in the community for input and data; (c) synthesize information from the community and local government; (d) use, or where necessary, develop tools to analyze data; (e) create multiple solution paths and present them to the community for feedback; and (e) where time permits, implement the solution based upon the feedback from the community. This team can build on the work of previous teams or start anew, and it is expected that it will also create a strong legacy for continuing such work in future semesters.

IPRO 497-03C OPEN SOURCE CONSTRUCTION. A number of developing communities face a myriad of harsh realities including joblessness, health and safety risks, and sub-standard housing. In many cases an assisted "First Step" in the right direction will help to alleviate some of these afflictions within the given community. We want to be able to provide this "First Step." During this phase of our project - Open Source Construction - we plan to achieve this by creating a guide that will teach the knowledge and skills required to generate a prolific, safe and sustainable construction and improvement method for building within these developing communities. Furthermore, this guide will include instructions in pictures, as well as multiple languages, so that people from different cultures and backgrounds will be able to understand and use the materials in a seamless fashion. The goals of this team is to put forth a business plan, deliver micro-workshops, maintain and extend on-line presence and expand content. The team will accomplish this by: (a) evaluating the guide to assure that it is successfully producing safe, sustainable housing in developing communities; (b) raising funds for research and guide evaluation and expansion; (c) choosing additional locations to launch the guide; (d) conducting first-hand guide evaluation at the specific locations; (e) expanding and installing an effective leadership structure; (f) conducting beta testing, revision and roll-out; and (g) expanding relationships with collaborating groups such as WorldServe, Engineers Without Borders and RISE International.

IPRO 497-01D SOCIAL INNOVATION WORKSHOP FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. Social Innovation is the act of developing new ideas -- whether concepts, products or services -- that positively serve to impact pressing global needs. These are issues that cut across the boundaries of the state, the market and the household. As a result, the classic tools of government policy on the one hand, and market solutions on the other, have proven inadequate. As such, over the last 40 years, this gap has prompted the growth of new social ventures, and in particular those that impact the developing world. These ventures, whether grown from a single idea or as a result of long-term service initiatives now span across both public and private markets. They remain distinct in that their production is driven by social values as a primary imperative rather than private financial appropriation. The goal of this project is to establish an on-going Social Innovation Workshop IPRO platform that can leverage our multidisciplinary talent and creativity to impact some of the world’s most difficult problems: increasing access to energy, increasing transport efficiencies, improving agricultural techniques, providing appropriate and sustainable solutions for clean water, safer housing, waste management and chronic disease. Members of the IPRO team will gain experience in hypotheses development, product development, business & market planning, field context development, program implementation, performance management & impact evaluation. This experience will prove invaluable as the student enters the dynamics of an economy that has profound implications for the future of public services as well as for the daily life of citizens.

IPRO 497-01E THE PRINCETON PARK COLLABORATIVE. The Princeton Park Collaborative serves to identify and address the needs of the nearby Princeton Park neighborhood at 95th and the Dan Ryan. As part of the larger Roseland community, Princeton Park is named for a 1944 development that replaced farm land with a park surrounded by houses. Critical relationships have been established, with various neighborhood organizations that allow unfettered contact with real stakeholders (community leaders, residents, and business owners). Teams are tasked with meeting these stakeholders, identifying their needs, responding to those needs, and presenting the team’s results to them. Princeton Park is a five-block by seven-block Chicago neighborhood that remains extremely walk-friendly and borders the 95th street stop of the CTA Red Line. The CTA stop allows the bulk of the neighborhood to be considered transit-oriented which provides unique development opportunities that other neighborhoods do not. Another unique amenity is a pedestrian bridge connecting school children to their elementary school east of the Dan Ryan. Previous projects undertaken through IPRO teams under the concept of a Princeton Park Collaborative have included the adaptive reuse of a previous church into a community center and the design of a 70-unit assisted senior living facility. The community center board is currently using the information provided by the IPRO teams in their search for funding. The work of the teams has included the development of needed programs; code and zoning analysis; construction and operating budgets; as well as schematic architectural and systems design. Through the work of IPRO teams, the Princeton Park Collaborative is destined to leave a long-lasting impact on this community interested in maintaining its identity and providing for its residents.

497-03: STEM Education Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) education through collaborative innovation.)

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Daniel Gandara (PSYC) (d.a.gandara@gmail.com), Susan Camasta (SAT) (camasus@hawk.iit.edu) and Michelle Jackson (PSYC)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 40 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2014, there are at least four themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be expanded to include new topics by the time the spring semester begins.

The STEM Education Innovation Cluster may include the following continuing topics that will have traditional IPRO teams on the order of 10 students from multiple disciplines organized to address them and/or there may be new topics that are incorporated in the STEM cluster:
  1. IPRO 497-03A Developing Teaching Modules for Journey World (Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana)
  2. IPRO 497-03B Developing Teaching Modules on Ecological Separation (Shedd Aquarium)
  3. IPRO 497-03C Developing K-3 Teaching Modules on Human-Made World (Erikson Institute)
  4. IPRO 497-03D Creating and Prototyping Concepts for a Meteor Strike Exhibit (Adler Planetarium)

497-04: Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by developing new venture concepts through user-centered design methods and collaborative innovation.)

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

TBD

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 40 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2014, there are five themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, Urban Agriculture Innovation, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation, and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster include those proposed by faculty members, and may be expanded to include other related topics by the time the spring semester begins.

Specifically related to the Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation Cluster, IIT students currently have a variety of individual entry points across the university for exploring their ideas, obtaining support and even forming a team to further develop their concepts. There are four critical elements that can inspire collaborative innovation and new venture development in a multidisciplinary team setting to create value: (1) Provide students with much more concentrated and sustained advising and critique from faculty and graduate student teams with complementary expertise in business, design, technology and law; (2) Inspire and encourage new venture concepts in dynamic, multi-team workshop environments that cultivate interaction, serendipitous connections, breakthrough thinking, and a touch of competitive spirit; (3) Facilitate multidisciplinary interaction in a collaborative space with resources that enable progression through phases of design thinking as well as multiple levels of prototyping refinement, from foam board and duct tape to 3D modeling and printing; (4) Promote the user-centered design thinking process as a powerful toolkit for stimulating innovation and guiding inquiry through progressive and iterative phases.

This themed IPRO cluster will be comprised of up to 70 students organized in small, agile multidisciplinary teams. An important foundation for this cluster is the application of user-centered design methods, with an overarching balance of attention to user desirability, technical feasibility and business viability. Teams that are formed will be guided through the innovation process that begins with problem/opportunity definition and research, emphasizes ethnographic research, identifies driving insights, inspires brainstorming and promotes iterative prototyping with user feedback.

Students who participate in this themed cluster will be relentless and tenacious in properly framing possibilities, methodical and self-disciplined in developing valid and reliable data and insights, and creative and opportunistic in recognizing and capitalizing on driving insights.

497-05: Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by reframing urban system issues through the application of user-centered design methods and collaborative innovation.)

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (ID) (mail@limiashunia.com) and Roberto Cammino (MMAE) (cammino@iit.edu) in collaboration with Bonnie Haferkamp (BME), Fouad Teymour (ChBE), Jamshid Mohammadi (CAEE), Paul Anderson (CAEE) and Eric Brey (BME)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 40 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2014, there are at least four themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation, and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster include those proposed by faculty members, and may be expanded to include other related topics by the time the spring semester begins.

This IPRO themed cluster focused to innovative solutions to urban problems examines urban systems and is led by several Engineering Faculty members. It is anticipated that this cluster topic will lead to multiple themed clusters focused to our engineering themes, i.e., water, health, energy, security. Cities function because of (or in spite of) urban systems, which can be loosely defined as any collection of independent parts that work together to make cities work better (or not). Examples of such systems include those that provide energy, communications, education, healthcare, water supply, solid waste management, recreation, and transportation. Above and beyond conventional repair, urban systems need redesign to move forward toward the intelligent, integrated systems that will make future cities work.

Students in this multi-team IPRO cluster will examine the challenges posed by urban systems, propose creative solutions to those challenges, and then form innovation teams focused on the research and development of prototype solutions. We anticipate there will be at least four independent teams created within the cluster focused to individual projects that they wish to pursue.

In addition to increasing awareness and understanding of urban problems and using innovative multidisciplinary approaches to address these problems, students in this IPRO section will learn and develop skills related to team dynamics, project management, economic analysis, and life-cycle assessment --- all in the context of applying discipline-specific fundamental knowledge and problem solving methods.

497-302: Investing in New Natural Gas Power Generation

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

TBD

Sponsor:

Sargent & Lundy LLC

Faculty:

Don Chmielewski (ChBE) (chmielewski@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

This project is contingent upon confirmation of final commitment from sponsor and faculty member.

In the current power generation landscape, the increased supply has driven down prices of natural gas. These prices have driven the economic feasibility of building and operating new simple cycle and combined cycle combustion turbines for power generation. Utilities looking to build new power generation are forced to choose between building smaller capacity peaking units or larger capacity cycling units. The decision between building a peaking unit and a cycling unit must be evaluated prior to submitting a proposal to supply electricity to the grid. Peaking units are typically smaller units that are required to send power to the grid very quickly after dispatched. This may occur when electricity demand is at its greatest or when other power generation is unavailable, for example emergency maintenance of a coal plant or if the wind speed is not sufficient to turn the turbines at a wind farm. The quick response is rewarded with a higher electricity sale price; however the annual capacity factor is low due to the primary use of other power sources, such as base loaded coal and renewable power. Meanwhile, cycling units are typically larger capacity units that, while the unit load may change, have a more predictable dispatch and slower response time. The main value of these units is the larger capacity factor per year; it should be noted, however, that the increased capacity factor results in lower electricity sale price.

An existing power generation site is located near a natural gas pipeline, a power grid tie-in location, and with room to install a new combustion turbine was determined to be a viable location for natural gas-sourced power generation. Due to the amount of renewable power sources in the region, a request for proposal (RFP) has been submitted and allows proposals for either a new peaking or cycling power plant. Both types of power plants are useful in the region; peaking units will be dispatched when the solar or wind power is not able to meet the electrical demand, while cycling units are used to supplement the non-dispatchable renewable power or to take advantage of lower seasonal natural gas prices to meet the typical electricity demand on a constant basis. As a utility, which type of plant would you propose as a better investment?

This project will require students of multiple disciplines to work together to determine the best path forward. Sargent and Lundy has tasked the IPRO participants with addressing the following items in order to help select the better investment: (1) Outline the unit arrangement, including all air and water quality control systems equipment needed for each power plant type; (2) Determine the capital cost for each power plant type and all associated equipment; (3) Determine the annual operating and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with each type of power plant; (4) Evaluate cycling profiles expected for each type of power plant and predict annual capacity factors for power generation; (5) Determine the net present value (NPV) of each option to determine which has a lower cost over a 20-year investment period; (6) At what dispatch price for each type of power plant will the utility see a rate of return of 12 percent on the investment?

497-303: Application of Low-Cost Embedded Processing and Open Source Radio Frequency Technology to Electronic Surveillance

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Spectrum Warfare Systems Department, Naval Warfare Systems Command, Crane, Indiana

Faculty:

Chi Zhou (ECE) (zhou@iit.edu) in collaboration with Ken Zdunek (ECE), Yang Xu (ECE) and Boris Pervan (MMAE)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Physics

Description:

The Spectrum Warfare Systems Department of Naval Systems Warfare Command (NSWC) Crane is one of several providers of engineering services ranging from research and development to systems engineering and sustainment of electronic warfare Systems for the United Stated Navy and Department of Defense. As part of our charter for electronic warfare, we are interested in the implications of technology for both military and civil applications. One particular technology area of interest relates to the application of low cost embedded processing and open source radio frequency technologies to problems of electronic surveillance.

A recent survey of the open source ecosystem is showing migration of software-defined radio technologies coupled with low cost of entry electronics components and design tools which place the ability to create effective RF tools which were previously out of reach of the casual users. Just as low cost 3-D printers have had a disruptive effect on manufacturing, the arrival of low cost electronic components when combined with open source integrated development environments has strong potential to have disruptive effects on the spectrum and use of the spectrum.

NSWC Crane proposes a three semester project under the IPRO program that seeks to define and develop a software defined radio capability that leverages existing electronic, computing and radio technology to demonstrate the ability to conduct multilateration of selected radio signals, including ADS-B. Multilateration has been proposed as a key component of the transition of air traffic control’s Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B).

Multilateration has been around for many years and was first introduced as a navigational aid in the LORAN and OMEGA global navigation systems. Both of these systems belong to a family of hyperbolic navigation systems which measure the time difference of arrival (TDOA) of a signal from three or more receiver sites. A master station eliminates the need for a common clock.

Several approaches to construct ADS-B receivers using low cost electronics components have been proposed or have been developed. One example is the radar cape development for the beaglebone (ref:http://circuitco.com/support/index.php?title=Radarcape).Other potential solutions may be created from various Altera and Xilinx university development boards such as the ZEDBOARD, DE0-nano when combined with open source RF-projects such as myriad-rf and blade-rf. GNU-Radio and USRP SDRs also demonstrate ADS-B signal reception and display.

The end deliverable of the proposed three-semester project will be a demonstration of low-cost multilateration of ADS-B signals. The project team will develop or modify open- source RF boards and platforms to receive, process and display the positions of ADS-B receivers from the airspace surrounding IIT. Full implementation of the ADS-B specification is not required. Success is defined as being able to accurately and consistently display position information determined by multilateration and compare it to the aircraft’sreported position via ADS-B beacon. To be consistent with the 16 week semester timeline as well as to introduce a formal systems engineering / product engineering review process, the project may be phased as follows:

First Semester: Problem Definition and Preliminary Design. Students will capture project goals, concepts of operation and use cases to determine functional requirements of an ADS-Bmultilateral demonstration. The students will participate in trade studies that consider cost and performance to come up with a concept design for the multilateration demonstration. The deliverables for the first phase of this effort is a partitioned concept design, anenumerated budget, an integrated schedule (such as in ms project or open source equivalent), product performance specifications, and requirements managed in a systems engineering requirements management tool such as IBM DOORs or equivalent. The culminating eventwould be a design review equivalent to a preliminary design review (PDR). Use of open source environments and tools such as GITHUB and the Eclipse IDE are encouraged.

Second Semester: Detailed Design. Students will begin detailed design of the project based on the PDR design. During this phase actual software and firmware coding will commence, hardware design (as applicable) will begin and testing concepts will be developed to verify performance specification requirements. Engineering proof of concepts may be procured or produced to demonstrate soundness of technical approach. The culminating event of this phase would be a design review equivalent to a critical design review (CDR) where thedetailed design is described and approved for production.

Third Semester: Product Integration and Demonstration. Students will procure or fabricate the final engineering demonstration hardware and integrate all functional items into a working package. Students will conduct testing of the article to verify that the requirements have been met. The conclusion of this effort will be a demonstration of ADS-B multilateration, delivery of the technical data package for the project, a technical report of thedemonstration and at least one working copy of the hardware, firmware and software.

Other considerations: As this is a multi-disciplinary project, the team can also include any scope necessary to demonstrate legal or policy considerations of the project, include business case for low rate production of the product or describe the issue of ADS-B within a much larger framework of international air traffic control policy. The bulk of the effort is very engineering heavy and would bring together the efforts of software, hardware and firmware designers. The ultimate goal is to introduce students to a realistic problem, challenge a team to apply engineering rigor and give it the freedom to innovate solutions to multilateration.

497-304: Integration of Process Improvements

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

TBD

Sponsor:

A.Finkl & Sons

Faculty:

Sheldon Mostovoy (MMAE) (mostovoy@iit.edu), William Maurer (INTM) (maurer@iit.edu), Roberto Cammino (MMAE) (cammino@iit.edu) and other faculty as appropriate

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

A project with A.Finkl & Sons is contingent upon further defining a topic, which may or may not be a continuation of the current IPRO 304 project, as well as gaining the commitment of faculty members with expertise appropriate to the project.

497-307: Intermodal Container Facility Innovations for the Chicago Area

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 to 11:15 am

Sponsor:

Mi-Jack, Inc.

Faculty:

Laurence Rohter (CAEE) (rohter@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

Intermodal Freight is the transfer of Containers and Trailers from Rail to Truck and from Truck to Rail. Chicago is the most important railroad center in North America. More lines of track radiate in more directions from Chicago than from any other city, with six of the seven major railroads have important operations in the Chicago region. As a result of this volume of rail activity, intermodal is one of the largest economic engines in the Chicago Area. There are new situations affecting this Transportation Hub: (a) Reshoring (more and more domestic containers shuttling goods around the U.S);Box Car Curtailments (moving goods previously shipped by box car to containers, double stacked, and trailers on flat cars); Panama Canal Expansion nearly on-line, but late and over-budget; and Chinese Company purchase of franchise for a Nicaragua cross-Isthmus canal; (b) Better Thermal Controls of Shipments; (c) Tighter Management Tools; and (d) Alternative uses of containers, such as Emergency Housing.

The objectives of this IPRO project will focus on four inter-related areas: (1) Logistics Revisions to examine the course of expected/envisioned changes in World-wide, National and Regional supply chains; (2) Continuation of thermal model development specific to the environment of transport containers, not too dissimilar to small buildings; (3) Application of the most powerful modeling tools available for event type simulations and 3D visualizations; and (4) Building on the opportunity to use the C5 Container (Compassonate Containers for Critical Communities and Catastrophes).

The IPRO team will undertake several tasks in parallel:

Thorough review of the situational picture relative to anticipating changes in Intermodal technologies and demand.

Thorough review of the effects of the 2013 Washington IL and earlier Joplin MO tornados to determine contents and extents of C5 containers. Expectation is to produce a publishable paper.Develop an implementation strategy in co-operation with the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation for designing and manufacturing C5 containers, and co-ordinate an awareness campaign.

Enhance work and models previously developed for enroute thermal prediction and packaging with additional testing and protocol development.

Incorporate several new leading edge tools to provide better intermodal yard planning and operations: (a) Arena simulation software by Rockwell Automation helps to demonstrate, predict, and measure system strategies for effective, efficient and optimized performance; and (b) Unity 3D is a universal tool for architectural visualizations, interactive media installations, and video game development.

497-313: Refuelable Electric Vehicle

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

Electric cars are very clean and efficient, but suffer from lack of range and long recharging time. People would use electric cars a lot more if it were possible to recharge a car in less than ten minutes, and do so repeatedly without fear of wrecking the battery. Our approach is to install a "refuelable" zinc-air battery in a vehicle, and demonstrate the concept in a record-breaking long distance road trip.

This project has been going on for a number of semesters. Progress has been slow, but steady, until this spring, with an unusually energetic team making significant strides. For Fall 2014, the main objectives are: (1) Design and build the appropriate components for a zinc-oxide storage system; (2) Write a patent application for the same; (3) Build a full-scale cell to power the vehicle, provided the Spring-14 design works as intended; and (4) Start a massive fundraising campaign to support the upcoming road demonstration.

The team will be organized in sub-teams of four or five people, with each team tasked with part of the project. Weekly meetings will coordinate the effort between teams, while other weekly meetings will concentrate on the tasks for each individual team. The Fall 2014 teams are likely to focus on each of the four objectives described above. This project is quite mature, but there is still opportunity for innovation via new ideas as the main concepts are implemented in practice.

497-338: Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Electrical Contractors' Association of City of Chicago (ECA)

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

There are many economically disadvantaged communities with non-profit buildings that are old and energy inefficient, with poorly environmentally-designed buildings that could benefit from energy efficiency upgrading. However, due to lack of financial resources and their old age, and often architectural design, it is difficult to find cost-effective solutions to improve them.

Thus, a technical and socially-complex problem is to identify the root causes of the energy inefficiencies in collaboration with stakeholders (building owners, building management, and sponsor), given the often myriad array of building constraints (e.g., historic sites that can't be altered, city codes, building structure design, operations of the building itself).

The objective of this IPRO project is to conduct an energy audit of a not-for-profit, financially depressed building, working with the the stakeholders, building operations management, ECA and NECA national competition criteria to 1) identify energy inefficiencies and 2) propose financially creative, environmentally conscious, and viable energy solutions to the energy inefficiencies where there currently exist no clear financially-viable solutions.

The approach requires the collaboration of students from engineering, architecture, design, industrial technology, computer science and engineering, and other disciplines to undertake rigorous action research methodology (solving a technical problem) by conducting in-depth energy and cost-benefit analysis of the building through research, conducting Thermal Readings of the facility, investigating Smart Technologies(s) in addressing the problem of improving green and energy efficiency that offer a reasonable ROI.. Financial considerations will be a major part of a viable solution.

The IPRO team will also benefit from consultation from the IIT Smart Grid Program Office, with Dr. Mohammad Shahidehpour at the Center for Electricity Innovation, as well as the electrical contracting industry. For example, Mr. Frank Gurtz, Gurtz Electric, is currently the president of the student committee of ECA working with the current IPRO team.

497-346: Sky's the Limit: Retracing the Technological Evolution of Aviation and its Impact on Architecture

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

John Manaves (ARCH) (jmanaves@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Civil Engineering, Engineering Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics

Description:

With over a quarter of a million people flying in the air between ground and space at any given moment, this IPRO continuing project will challenge this mode of temporary existence, researching and developing aerial architecture.

The IPRO team will retrace the technological evolution of aviation and the impact on the designed world rethinking current technologies within architecture and design. In 1891 Alexander Graham Bell began to experiment with the idea of creating heavier than air structures. In this new world the Wright Brother’s winged aviation model of flight is trumped by Alexander Graham Bell’s visions. The emphasis of an elevated ground is explored. A new aerial fiction is produced by hybridizing techniques found in modern aviation with the past. Within this context emerging technologies will be developed and explored. In an attempt to challenge the city, a temporary inhabitable flying platform will be designed and prototyped. The plan is to design a platform that can fly above the tallest towers in the world rethinking the basic principle of the city skyline, the skyscraper.

The project will progress through three phases:

Phase 01 Precedents & Types -- Encompasses research, analysis and documentation of iconic works of architecture that are categorized as aerial projects to better understand historical precedents and how they relate to course interests. A comprehensive categorization and documentation will be created.

Phase 02 Up-Skilling (Overlapping Phase 01) -- Emerging technologies within the field of architecture will be explored and learned. The hacking and reuse of these technologies will assist in the development of phase 03. Software and hardware will be explored, including advanced fabrication techniques.

Phase 03 Aerial Vision & Prototyping -- Prototypes of new proposed structures will be developed using various IIT resources. A team will be developed to explore and test both physical and digital models.

497-351: PathPass: Opening Doors for People with Disabilities

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Kevin Meade (MMAE) (meade@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Psychology

Description:

Injured students and others must deal with the difficulties of getting around between classes -- going through and opening doors. Automatic buttons do not solve all of the issues of entering or leaving a building independently.

What if the door opened for them? PathPass is a sensor mechanism that an injured or disabled person can use to open doors automatically and avoid issues related to reaching and pushing the button and having a door close prematurely. It works by attaching the device to your crutches or wheelchair. A companion device is installed in a door so that it will respond and open as you approach it.

The purpose of this IPRO project is to further research, prototype, test and develop viable solutions. This will involve understanding the elements of a balanced breakthrough methodology, namely, considering technical feasibility, user desirability and business viability.Objective

The idea of PathPass is to create a device that opens doors wirelessly for temporarily injured or handicapped individuals. PathPass is an improved version of the standard handicapped door opener. While a common way of traveling for incapacitated persons is to push a button to open the door at the main entrance of a building, doors are everywhere in buildings: offices, bathrooms and classrooms. If you or a companion has ever been injured, you are familiar with the difficulties this presents. To implement this device on a commercial or residential type door would make traveling itself easier to deal with at such a difficult time for the user and possibly a caretaker.

The goals of this project are to identify at least three feasible, economically viable approaches to implementing the PathPass concept and to construct one working prototype by the end of the semester. We anticipate this project will likely extend to a second semester to bring the solution to the point where it can be produced commercially.

As part of our IPRO team, we have enlisted two outside consultants who have extensive expertise and practical experience interacting with people with disabilities; Ms. Mardy Chizek, RN, FNP, MBA, Chizek Consulting, Inc., Charism® Eldercare Services and Ms. Sandy Bernabe, Nursing Aid. Ms. Chizek has worked on an IPRO before with Professor Meade. Both Ms. Chizek and Ms. Bernabe have extensive experience caring for patients with disabilities and dealing with the type of issues mentioned in this proposal.

We also have on our team Ms. Laura Castaneda, who is a recent IIT graduate in Materials Science and Engineering and co-instructor for IPRO 351. Ms. Castaneda worked as a co-instructor with Professor Meade on IPRO 350 in the fall 2013 semester, which won two Dean’s Choice Awards. Ms. Castaneda has experience in the design of prosthetics and orthotics and in project management, both of which have many parallels with this project.

Another possible extension being contemplated is that this project could be the first in a series in rehabilitation and engineering related projects that could be adapted for STEM programs. We may be able to build upon the experiences of IPRO 350 ProSolutions “Prosthetic Solutions for the Working World” and IPRO 351 PathPass: “Opening Doors for People with Disabilities”, to construct viable STEM projects for high school students and beginning college students.

Several possible solutions to this problem and enhancements will be investigated. For example: (a) Using an RFID scanner, a trigger with a button mounted on a cane or a wheelchair could open and close the door and could be connected wirelessly through using a technology such as Bluetooth; (b) Voice activated options to open and close the door might be implemented on smart phones; (c) Consider the interactions of different approaches to the problem such as the effects working with a caretaker; and (d) Consider adding other features to the device such as being able to detect the location of the nearest handicapped accessible entrance, handicapped accessible washroom, etc.

We will rely on a traditional team structure, at least initially. This will include a project manager, and leaders of three subgroups representing three different approaches to solving the problem. The subgroups will be as diverse as possible in terms of majors. Also, we will have team members responsible for basic functions of the team such as: (i) taking meeting minutes, (ii) making and distributing meeting agendas, (iii) IPRO Day Coordinator and (iv) IPRO 351 Blog Moderator. The IPRO 351 Blog will give the students a means to keep track of their experiences in the course. Weekly blog posts will be required, conform to a specified structure, and graded.

In a project like this one, involvement of persons with disabilities and their caretakers is especially important. Ms. Chizek and Ms. Bernabe have daily experience with persons with disabilities as their caretakers and they can be a source of patients. For example, to involve patients in interviews, we can have the IPRO team get IRB qualified through online NIH resources http://phrp.nihtraining.com/users/login.php?l=3 (this was done in IPRO 350). This will also give the team an awareness of the many ethical issues that come up in projects such as this one.

On Tuesdays, the team will have updates on subgroup progress and announcement of any homework assignments. We will occasionally have visits from our collaborators and stakeholders as well as short lectures on issues about rehabilitation technology by Professor Meade. During the other part of class, subgroup work will be conducted possibly in other venues such as the Idea Shop.

The following outline is subject to review and revision by the IPRO team.

Stage 1: Preparations and Research. We will look into the current state of the art in door-opening world to gain insight into what technologies we can utilize for PathPass. In the end, we want to select a specific type of door and a specific environment to develop a working prototype for testing. This involves consideration of (a) Current door-opening technologies; (b) Types of doors; (c) Categories of companies/institutions whose doors would implement this technology; and (d) Exploration of Bluetooth technologies that we hope to use (and other potential options for replacement technologies). We will research the users we are marketing to, in order to gain insight into their needs and struggles. This way, we can work to develop PathPass into a product that would help in circumstances real people actually experience.

Stage 2: Building a Prototype. PathPass is the actual device the user would interact with, for example, attached to a crutch or wheelchair, or push button. This device will be developed, as well as the complementary device/technology to upgrade the given door to a PathPass capable/enabled door. Activities include (a) CADD a design for a specified doorway; (b) Construct the mechanical portion with respect to the doorway; and (c) Apply the electrical features to the design (Bluetooth module).

Stage 3: Testing, Prototyping, and Redesign. Once we have a working prototype of the door and device, we want to get real opinions from people who would make use of this product. Unbiased people can give us insight into details we didn’t pay attention to, problems we didn’t anticipate, etc. Activities include: (a) Address the issues of the design based on testing; (b) Simplify and make changes to upgrade; (c) Repeat to make efficient upgrade; and (d) Update user benefit description.

Stage 4: Results and Expansion Discussion. In the end, we should be convinced and be able to convince others why PathPass is a worthwhile product, i.e., why people need it and what makes it special. Finally, we want to explore a world where Path Pass is implemented. At this point, we will explore further topics like nurse/caretaker involvement. Activities include: (a) Finalize user definition and benefits description; (b) Finalize PathPass product description; and (c) Develop a platform to market the product.

497-354: Developing Sustainable Production Support Systems

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

TBD

Sponsor:

Quam-Nichols Company

Faculty:

William Maurer (INTM) (maurer@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Business Administration, Business Administration & Applied Science, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics

Description:

A project with Quam Nichols is contingent upon further defining a topic, which may or may not be a continuation of the current IPRO 354 project.

Quam Nichols Company was established in 1930 on the south side of Chicago where it still operates today. In the early years, much of the manufacturing of "store-bought" radios was done in the Midwest and Quam Nichols was the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) for the speakers found in most of the brand name radios of the time, and then televisions and other consumer electronics after that. Today, Quam continues to design and manufacture a wide scope of loudspeaker and installation solutions for the changing installed sound industry. If the project involves signaling, sound masking, voice or music, look to Quam as your "problem solver." (http://quamspeakers.com)

Quam Nichols aims to further enhance the level of manufacturing responsiveness to support the needs of its customers. Improved responsiveness is critical to maintaining a competitive advantage. Presently, the Quam offers the IPRO team the challenge of assessing current production practices and investigating improvement options that could achieve reduced lead times and increased productivity.

If Quam Nichols commits to sponsoring an IPRO project for fall 2014, a description of the project's objectives and approach will be included here.

497-355: Exploring/Integrating Sustainability Concepts for a Power Plant Building Design in the Pacific Northwest

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

TBD

Sponsor:

Sargent & Lundy LLC

Faculty:

Nancy Hamill-Governale (ARCH) (hamill@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

This project is contingent upon final commitment from the sponsor regarding continuation of the current IPRO 355 topic, which is included below only for convenient reference:

SPRING 2014 IPRO DESCRIPTION:

This IPRO project will explore the application of sustainable building design methods to modern Natural Gas power plant design, focusing on the building structures and related systems not the power production process. This project will be undertaken in collaboration with Sargent & Lundy LLC as they develop plans for a power plant to be built in the Pacific Northwest.

The IPRO team will explore opportunities to introduce sustainable methods to plant facilities and work areas during the design phase of this active project and make recommendations to the design firm for implementation. Following semesters will focus on implementing the recommendations on this plant as it is built. This project will culminate during the construction phase of the project with the implementation of the concepts of sustainable building on the power plant structures.

Based on the above, the IPRO team will explore ideas and concepts and propose a range of creative possibilities through the following types of tasks:
  1. Analyze LEED certification opportunities as the IPRO project unfolds in order to determine which LEED certification level could be achieved based on the IPRO team's work in the following areas.
  2. Potential for conceptualizing that the power plant administration building could be designed as a stand-alone, highly efficient and environmentally responsible Zero Energy Building.
  3. Opportunity to explore concepts for the design of the envelope and enclosure of the power plant in terms of aesthetics, heat cycle, energy utilization for both heating and cooling, etc.
  4. Investigate and evaluate the technical and economic benefits and costs of the latest approaches to building systems that may be appropriate for this application.
  5. Investigate and develop a broad-based analysis of the potential for site sustainability that could span landscaping, geothermal, cooling towers, etc.

497-356: Techno-Business User-Application Trends Analysis of US Motor & Transformer Electricity Consumption

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Tempel Steel

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com) and Hanna Korel (ID) (hanna.korel@gmail.com) in consultation with Ian Brown (ECE) (ibrown1@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

Did you know that upwards of 60 percent of the electricity generated in the US has been attributed to motors? Even a one percent improvement in average motor efficiency would save a huge amount of electricity and reduce the need for new power generating stations. (Source: A.D.Little circa 1975)

Since the mid-1970's no study has been completed to model electricity consumption in motors and transformers in the US. However, in the early 2000's the US Department of Energy (DOE) introduced energy regulations that progressively enforce improved energy efficiency in a selected range of distribution transformers. At the same time, the National Electric Motor Association (NEMA) has developed guidelines for a progressive improvement in energy efficiency for a range of industrial-sized motors. Similar initiatives have begun in Europe and other regions of the globe.

In spite of these steps by government agencies and industry associations, there remain problems and challenges that affect dramatic shifts to more efficient motors and transformers, which in turn affects energy consumption. This is in part due to the fact that while everyone believes that improvements in energy efficiency are worthwhile, no one has quantified the benefits nor undertaken a cost/benefit analysis. The NEMA guidelines are not enforceable so motor manufacturers do not have a major incentive for improvement. There is also a gap in knowledge on how to improve motor efficiencies in the most cost-effective way possible. Finally, there is no coherent body of information that combines motor engineering principles, consumption statistics, and effects of energy efficiency improvements into a model that can offer insights and lead to recommendations that can be used by DOE and others to shape and influence public policy and energy strategy.

Given this background and opportunity, Tempel (http://www.tempel.com) is interested in working with an IPRO team over multiple semesters to establish the coherent body of information described above.

The objective of the 2nd semester project will be to advance the work of the first spring 2014 semester of the project. The spring team provided a progress report to the Sponsor in early March detailing the research accomplished and plan for the balance of the spring 2014 semester. Semester 1 results will provide Semester 2 (this proposed project) with specific market targets to continue motor efficiency investigation. The plan is to formulate a plan of action in semester 2 to involve Tempel Steel, the Electric Motor Industry and impacted parties to drive motor efficiency via policy, regulation, design, incentives, etc..

The approach of the IPRO team for the fall 2014 semester will be similar to the spring 2014 semester. The team will launch from the first semester results and advance the subject of motor efficiency. The team will complete research, share findings with team members and explore solutions. The goal is to formulate an action plan with specific actions and goals that if implemented could move the electric motor industry to improved efficiency.

The above IPRO purpose can be aided by conducting broad secondary research, as well as surveying major motor and transformer manufacturers and other sources of information. This study could involve investigation of appropriate algorithms and models for depicting and understanding electricity consumption due to motors and transformers and the drivers of technological change that affect future enabling technologies, products, applications, markets and competition. This work could establish a baseline of motor and transformer energy consumption that could be monitored over time to determine progress made toward fully realizing potential energy savings through improved motor and transformer efficiencies. This work could also help to inform public policy strategies combinations of regulations and incentives that stimulate innovation in motor and transformer efficiency improvements. Finally, there may be opportunities for such motor and transformer efficiency and consumption patterns at various levels and in various industries to inform the research, design and planning process for lamination manufacture. A great example is the long term market penetration expected for hybrid and electric vehicles and their demand for motors as well as demand for power, whether via conventional sources or renewables.

This IPRO team will have the benefit of a balanced instructor team in learning and applying market research and survey methods as well as methods associated with user-centered design that help to capture trend information, identify insights and conceptualize opportunities. IIT faculty expertise in power conversion technologies, power electronics and electric machines is also an important resource for the IPRO team in understanding motor and transformer technologies and trends.

497-359: The Simularium: Exploring Opportunities for an Immersive Environment with 3D Visualization at IIT

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 7:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmkinn5@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Design, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering

Description:

Currently, only the largest of building industry companies can afford and benefit from leading edge technology. The broader building industry has a great deal to gain in cost / schedule / quality management by the advancements in digital technology. This IPRO project will develop a visualization, communication and management system called a Simularium that will be in the financial reach a broader building industry audience.

We are at the early stages of the digital frontier and the background of making it affordable and finding effective applications for the building industry. This frontier offers opportunities of simplicity and efficiency as well as changing the way we currently build buildings. Our objective is to create a 'poor man's' digital cave, or a Simularium, that can offer inter- and intra-office visualization, communication and management benefits to architects, engineers, contractors, sub-contractors as well as clients.

The IPRO team will research the historical technology, applications, and cost of digital caves and the associated realm virtual / augmented reality. Parallel to this, the team will document the role, function, benefits and cost of this technology. The team will also filter this information through a design process toward creating a working prototype and a cost benefit analysis by the end of the semester. This IPRO will be influenced by: Oblong Mezzanine, Sixth Sense Technology, Chrisie, Blue Marble 3D, UIC Cave2, BIM, and two previous IPRO teams guided by Prof Bob Krawczyk.

497-363: IIT Pride: Improving Student & University Community Engagement

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays from 8:35 to 11:15 am

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Hammond (ID) (stevehammond1@mac.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Spirit and pride define the soul of an educational institution. Developing pride requires cultural and climate shifts for the institution's community and commitment from a wide range of constituencies. This IPRO project will explore the complex nature of school pride in all aspects of college life. This IPRO’s history began in athletics and has expanded to other opportunities in the college community. The team will draw on work done by prior IPROs for inspiration and will work on problem definitions and solutions of their own choosing. This self-directed aspect is an important element of the project. After developing their own perspective on the challenge, students will work as a team to develop and implement projects to develop pride in the community.

The first objective will be for the team to define (or redefine) the challenge using techniques from design, creative problem solving and non-directive coaching. Through repetitive use of both generative and evaluative tools, the team will then work to develop products and services that would be useful in building pride in IIT. The student team will learn about innovation processes and will use them to develop its deliverables. A key objective is learning what works, what doesn't and why. Based on progress by prior teams, the scope of the project will likely expand beyond athletics and the on-campus population to include commuters, faculty, alumni and others.Approach

The team will use a combination of tools used by designers, creative problem solvers and leadership coaches. Each student will be required to manage the agenda and execution of a class session. The students will choose the sub-challenges they wish to pursue and will have opportunities to take on different roles during the project. Teamwork and the dynamics of team formation and learning are an important part of the process.

497-371: Creating a Reliable Sports Players' Statistical Performance Evaluation Methodology

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Journalism, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

There have been discrepancies in rating baseball players’ performance using the statistical IRA (Individual Ratio Analysis) which has not always been accurate, has biases, and has been detrimental to players’ careers and the team. Sports franchises could benefit from a better way of determining sports players’ performance that is a more accurate reflection of players’ performance and worth to the team.

The objective of this IPRO project is to explore statistical and non-statistical methods of evaluating sports players’ performance that offer more reliable and accurate evaluation of players’ performance and worth to a team. The objective is also to include a performance rating system that takes into account the player’s performance and the team’s performance with a solid statistical basis.

This IPRO project is proposed to span two semesters, summer and fall 2014, requiring collaboration from many fields of study -- engineering, computer science, business, architecture, etc. The IPRO team will take an open-ended approach to addressing the problem statement. The analysis, brainstorming alternatives, statistical analysis, algorithms, prototyping, business model development and planning for this project require a wide range of student backgrounds and interests that can creatively identify and validate potential commercial applications and markets.

497-375: Developing a User-Friendly, Compact and Effective Method for Terminating Multiple Magnet Wire Bundles for Electrical Industry Applications

Semester:

Fall 2014

Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Panduit, Tinley Park, Illinois

Faculty:

Sheldon Mostovoy (MMAE) (mostovoy@iit.edu), William Maurer (INTM) (maurer@iit.edu), Roberto Cammino (MMAE) (cammino@iit.edu) and other faculty as appropriate

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics

Description:

Magnet wire is extensively used in applications that require current to be routed in coils without producing a short circuit (transformers, inductors, motors, electromagnets etc.). The modern form of magnet wire has been in use since 1911, but despite the maturity of the magnet wire industry, there is not a single solution that is widely accepted as the ideal solution for attaching connectors to magnet wire ends. Magnet wire is made of copper or aluminum with a polymer film insulation (can be polyamide, polyester, polyamide-polyimide etc.) and comes in various shapes and sizes (round, rectangular and square). The insulation coating must meet rigid electrical, thermal, and abrasion specifications and thus, cannot be easily removed from the wire. This creates a problem for joining magnet wires as the conventional approach of removing the insulation jacket of the wire is no longer applicable. The existing methods employed in the industry are the following: (1) Processes that remove the wire coating through mechanical, chemical, laser and thermal means. The stripped wires can now be terminated with conventional means (use of compression lugs, soldering etc.); (2) Using insulation displacement connectors that pierce through the insulation coating and make the electrical joint and (3) Resistance welding connectors on the ends of the magnet wire (this process does not require stripping the coating, it vaporizes the coating to make the electrical connection).

All the existing methods described above have limitations. The mechanical stripping process is labor intensive and produces a lot of debris. The chemical stripping process is labor intensive as well and also, poses a significant health hazard in addition to being non-portable. The laser wire stripping machines in the market today are incredibly expensive (on the order of $200,000 per machine) and require a significant amount of time for staging the wire. The insulation displacement connectors available today can only handle a few strands of magnet wire at a time. The last method, resistance welding, involves the use of machines which are quite large and expensive, but produce a high quality connection. The goal of this project will be to develop a compact resistance welder for terminating multiple magnet wires. The end goal of the project will be a prototype that will utilize technology that can be implemented in a portable and safe package. The variables of the welding process will have to be identified, and modeled to allow different size magnet wires to be welded successfully.

The IPRO team will develop an understanding of current practices for creating terminations for magnet wire bundles in various applications, and to the extent possible, observe those who use the tools and equipment. In addition to other research, this will lead to developing insights about the process parameters and approaches to methods/devices that can create a more compact system that meets technical performance specifications, can be manufactured, and is compact and safe. The IPRO project will advance to the prototyping and testing stage over more than one semester, benefiting from the facilities and expertise available at Panduit and IIT labs.

Registration for this IPRO section is by permit only, and the team size will be on the order of 10 students from various majors. There is a special intellectual property agreement that students joining the team will review and agree to regarding disposition of any concepts that Panduit may wish to develop further.

Interested students should contact Professors Roberto Cammino (cammino@iit.edu), Sheldon Mostovoy (mostovoy@iit.edu), William Maurer (maurer@iit.edu) or Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu) to be considered as a member of the Panduit IPRO team.