IPRO Current Listings for Summer 2015

IPRO 000
IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SUMMER 2015
IPRO 497-105
The Business of YouTube (A Business Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-208
Innovative Structures (Part 1) (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-214
Developing Insights into IIT Electrical & Utility Vault Design, Water Leakage and Corrosion to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Cost (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-217
Assistive Solutions for People with Full or Partial Physical Disability at IIT (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-219
NEW! PassLok: User-Friendly Privacy Apps for the Web
IPRO 497-305
Community Engagement: Focus on the Roseland/Redline Extension Project (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-306
Urban Agriculture Innovation at IIT (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-307
Developing Urban Agriculture Facilities at Imani Village (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-308
Urban Activators: Englewood (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-309
IIT Hawk Pride (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-310
Design Thinking, Social Innovation and Technology: Balanced Breakthroughs for Social Change (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-311
Social Innovation Workshop (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-371
Using Embedded Systems to Improve Biofuel Combustion Efficiency (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

000: IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SUMMER 2015

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Meeting Days/Time:

All summer IPRO sections are scheduled for Session B which begins June 1 and concludes July 24.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Appropriate Disciplines:

Description:

Summer 2015 IPRO sections will be listed here by the end of March. At the same time, the IPRO sections will be listed under the subject "Interprofessional Project" by the registrar in the MyIIT portal for registration. All summer IPRO sections are scheduled for Session B which begins June 1 and concludes July 24.

We encourage students contemplating taking a summer IPRO course to come to the IPRO Registration Fair in the MTCC Bridge area on Monday, March 30, between 12 noon and 5 pm to meet IPRO instructors and learn more about projects being offered.

For the summer, we may be offering on the order of 8 to 10 traditional IPRO 497-3xx sections with 10 to 12 students each for students taking either their first or second IPRO course.

IPRO sections are set up with capacity limits and limits on the number of students from the majors that are expected to be most attracted to a specific IPRO project. As a result, it may appear that there are seats available in the registration system; however, some of those seats may be reserved for specific majors in order to best manage the multidisciplinary composition of the team.

If you are unable to register because the section is at capacity or there is any other seat availability restriction by major, you are urged to consider other IPRO sections that interest you. You may also add yourself to the wait list for a closed IPRO section. Students who are waitlisted will be reviewed by the IPRO Program staff and instructor if there is an opportunity to add students to a given IPRO section.

Questions about choosing an IPRO project and IPRO registration can be directed to Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu) or Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu).return to top

497-105: The Business of YouTube (A Business Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm. (Session B June 1 through July 24)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (Institute of Design) mail@limiashunia.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

In 2005, YouTube turned the power of the few — once held by collegiate, local and national network and cable television stations — over to the people. For anyone with access to the Internet, YouTube leveled the playing field by democratizing the ability to broadcast video content to a public audience.

As multiple contributors and content authors unrelentingly sought new ways to capitalize on their new-found freedom, a feverish evolution from video platform to social media powerhouse ensued. Becoming “viral” endowed established brands, amateurs and individuals alike with a dewy new super power -- a raw and unconventional way to get a really large fan base. Two years after launching, YouTube began the Partners program, allowing contributors to be compensated for their viral content. For individuals and small groups, this new revenue stream (some reported six figure incomes in year one) encouraged them to keep producing content, give up their day jobs, and “grow” their YouTube business by allowing advertisers to place ads on their highly watched channels. Since then, new typologies and methods have emerged in this exchange between the content creator and those willing to compensate that creator for access to their audience.

Today, YouTube, among other things, has proven to be a quirky entrepreneurial and star making machine. While the seemingly accessible dream of “making it” via YouTube becomes increasingly desirable and known to more individuals every year, it becomes likewise more challenging. The level of saturation that YouTube currently has means that the slice of the pie is shrinking. Those who aspire to stardom or becoming an entrepreneur will need to differentiate themselves among a deluge of competitors.

This IPRO project will explore how one can grow a business through a social medium such as YouTube. Students will hypothesize in the form of their own YouTube channel/business. By the end of the semester, the IPRO team will acquire research skills, apply that research to its creative and strategic process, attempt to engage an audience several times on YouTube’s platform, and report the outcomes of their experiment (possibly the seed of a new business) to digital advertising professionals.

WEEKS 1-3: In the first few weeks, the IPRO team will research and gather understanding about YouTube as a social media powerhouse. The team will render this understating through a 10-year evolutionary analysis of YouTube. The team will also view the documentary “Generation Like” to help understand the current ecosystem of content creators and advertising mechanisms participating in the social media macrocosm. In these early weeks, the team will also unearth information about numerous YouTube exemplar stars and entrepreneurs and characterize them into typologies.

WEEKS 4-8: During the second half of the semester, groups within the IPRO team will choose to use one or a hybrid of these types as a launching pad for a new YouTube channel. The groups will commit to prototyping a YouTube business by producing and posting two videos a week and also reaching out to those in the industry who could advance their YouTube visibility and status. The groups will measure success through key performance indicators that will be determined by the project type, number of hits, likes, and comments posted. The IPRO team’s overall work will also be evaluated by professionals from the digital advertising world.

IPRO 497-1xx sections with a "Business and Venture Innovation" concentration have the general aim of launching something into the world that people value. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the business or venture aspect.return to top

497-208: Innovative Structures (Part 1) (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm. (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Chicago Council of Carpenters, Icynene Spray Foam Products

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmkinn5@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering

Description:

INQUIRY: Is the construction industry evolving effectively with new innovations and technologies taking place within and outside of its boundaries? Further, is it appropriately endeavoring to make buildings affordable and environmentally responsible?

RESPONSE: A laboratory test in 2007 at the University of Florida demonstrated that the use of closed-cell spray foam in conventional frame construction resulted in a 4x lateral strength improvement of the structure. This IPRO project will take the next step and re-evaluate conventional wall frame construction in light of the spray foam structural benefits -- along with other relevant techniques and innovations -- with the goal of creating a low cost, holistically sustainable and state-of-the-art wall system.

CONSTRUCTION PRACTICE: The Wall will challenge (in material and composition) the convention of frame construction by merging fundamental structural techniques of bent plate, the arch, diaphragm, cross-bracing, bridging, tensioning, cantilever, web+flange, etc. with new technologies of spray foam (structural, thermal and moisture protection values), 3D printing / (pre)fabrication, high-performance / recycled / alternative materials, etc.

The objective is to establish a cost effective wall system that meets the traditional performance criteria (thermal, moisture, structural) and current sustainability requirements. Lower-cost systems translate to more affordable buildings and to be sustainable is to be environmentally responsible.

This IPRO project will be a very hands-on, mock-up oriented course and a great opportunity for the disciplines of architecture, structural / civil engineering, architectural engineering, material science, environmental engineering, chemical engineering, etc., to interact and explore a design, construction and innovation challenge.

This Construction Practice IPRO project pushes the limits of convention -- in material and thinking-- through a calculated, trial and error process including, but not limited to: (1) research, (2) analysis, (3) linear & non-linear / creative thinking, (4) hands-on interaction & mock-ups with materials and tools, (5) testing, and (6) iteration of the above cycle as necessary to converge on innovative concepts.IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-214: Developing Insights into IIT Electrical & Utility Vault Design, Water Leakage and Corrosion to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Cost (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 12:10 to 2:35 pm (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Contractors Power & Light and IIT Campus Utilities & Energy

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-214 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-339.]

Across the United States and specifically on the IIT campus there are many old, energy inefficient, poorly designed, corrosive, and environmentally-unfriendly utility vaults that consume energy and require incur maintenance costs. They are in dire need of improved design, maintenance, and upgrading. Liquid infiltration into the vaults can create serious problems, such as pipe and insulation deterioration, cable faults and corrosion, electrical component corrosion and failure, etc. Vaults include: (1) steam or district heating vaults; (2) chilled water or cooling distribution vaults; (3) electrical cable vaults; (4) electrical switchgear vaults; and (5) telecommunication vaults.

Working with the IIT Office of Campus Energy & Sustainability (OCES) and Consumers Power & Light, the objective of this continuing IPRO project is to conduct an energy/utility investigation and analysis of IIT selected utility vaults to (1) identify cause and effect factors and (2) propose creative, environmentally conscious and economically viable solutions to the utility design and maintenance inefficiencies where there currently are no obvious solutions. This requires a rigorous, in-depth approach to identify root causes of the problems being encountered, and viable engineering and economic solutions based on thorough analyses that can define initial, operating and maintenance costs that determine the expected return on investment.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-217: Assistive Solutions for People with Full or Partial Physical Disability at IIT (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm. (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Mahesh Krishnamurthy (ECE) (kmahesh@ece.iit.edu) and Eun-Jeong Lee (PSYC) (elee20@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

This IPRO team will identify challenges faced by students with disabilities faced at institutes of higher education. It will particularly consider STEM education, which is typically more tactile in terms of instruction, involving laboratory and hands-on project and research work.

The team will consider issues often ignored or not fully appreciated, such as partial blindness, partial hearing, and other possible limitations. The team will conduct secondary and primary research, ideally having conversations with those who have a disability. The instructors have experience in this area, including expertise related to people with disabilities. Current projects include assistive technologies for physically disabled people in the form of power assisted wheelchair. This includes an IIT WISER grant for "Using Psychology to Train Technology" focusing on assistive technology, but using the entire wheelchair system as the focus (not only the powertrain). As the next step, we are now expanding our scope to consider STEM education to determine how partial to full disability affects students in the engineering environment as a test case.

The research phase can then lead to identifying insights that inspire potential concepts and solutions. This will lead to prototyping and iterative testing of concepts with intended user groups. The ultimate aim is to enable students with disabilities to participate in projects and research activities comparable to students with no disability.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-219: NEW! PassLok: User-Friendly Privacy Apps for the Web

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

In August 2013, Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA and other agencies had engaged in warrant-less, large-scale surveillance of American citizens. The need to use strong encryption in personal communications is keenly felt, but unfortunately it remains hard to use by common people. This issue ties in directly with the Security theme of Armour College.

The plan is to test and further develop native apps and browser extensions for PassLok, a program created by Professor Ruiz, which implements high security cryptographic primitives on a simple user interface. This project got a good boost from the summer 2014 PassLok IPRO team, which created Version 2 and created a considerable increase in the user base. We expect the summer 2015 PassLok IPRO team to provide an even larger boost now that the issue is mostly user interface and acceptance.

There will be a two-pronged approach:

1. Security apps are famously hard to use, so there will be one team constantly performing usability testing of the different prototypes, supplemented with observation of users as they go about emailing, texting, etc.

2. The technical team or teams will take the knowledge gathered by the usability team and use it to tailor the user interface and the underlying operation of the program. There could be as many as three teams of this kind: iOS, Android, and browser extensions. return to top

497-305: Community Engagement: Focus on the Roseland/Redline Extension Project (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 7:40 pm. (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

[This IPRO 497-305 section continues work that was undertaken by IPRO teams in the IPRO 497-01 Community Engagement Cluster.]

The Roseland Redline Extension Project serves to identify and address the needs of the Roseland neighborhood that extends from 95th Street at the North to 130th at the South, and Halsted at the West and Cottage Grove at the East. During this research, the redevelopment of the 95th Street Redline Train Station has started. However, this is only a small part of the plans for the Greater Roseland Community. The Redline is to extend its service to include train stations at 103rd, Roseland Medical District (111th), 115th, and 130th Streets at I94. Working with the Developing Community Project's (DCP) 95th Street Panel of Development (POD), projects are being developed to improve the Roseland community along the Redline.

Also, critical relationships have been established, with various neighborhood organizations and developers that allow unfettered contact with stakeholders (community leaders, residents, and business owners). The IPRO team will meet these stakeholders, identify and respond to their needs and present results to them.

Once a thriving community, parts of Roseland served as a shopping area for the south sides of Chicago and was well known for its community friendly atmosphere. However, parts of the Roseland area are cut-off from the rest of Chicago because of its lack of transportation. The area has become a crime-ridden area with several abandoned homes and businesses. Parts are considered to be a food desert because of the lack of high end grocery stories. Some of the businesses located in Roseland have reached out to the IPRO Program to help in the gentrification of the area. It is the hope of the community that the new CTA stops will allows the bulk of the area to become a transit-oriented community which provides unique development opportunities that other neighborhoods do not have.

Previous projects undertaken through IPRO teams under the concept of a Princeton Park Collaborative have included the adaptive reuse of a previous church into a community center and the design of a 70-unit assisted senior living facility to be built by the St. James Methodist Church. The community center board and St. James is currently using the information provided by the IPRO teams in their search for funding. The work of the teams has included the development of needed programs; code and zoning analysis; construction and operating budgets; as well as schematics with architectural and systems design. Through the work of IPRO teams, the Roseland/Redline Extension Project is destined to leave a long-lasting impact on this community interested in maintaining its identity and providing for its residents.

For summer 2015, the IPRO team will develop plans for the gentrification of the Roseland community by using the DCP POD mentioned earlier. The IPRO team and the stakeholders are to expand research of the Roseland/Redline Extension Project to include more Community Churches, Businesses, Secondary Schools and Colleges in the development of Roseland. Due to the time restriction of the summer session, the IPRO team will determine what it can reasonably accomplish in the time available and lay a solid foundation for the fall 2015 IPRO team to advance its work.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-306: Urban Agriculture Innovation at IIT (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Rodger Cooley (ARCH) (rcooley@iit.edu) and Erika Allen (Growing Power)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architecture, Biology, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-306 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-02.]

The health and well being of individuals, communities and environments in the United States are challenged and compromised by the dominant industrial food system. Obesity, diabetes and other diet related diseases, waste of organic nutrients, massive water pollution, and excessive green houses gasses are linked to how food is produced, harvested, distributed, processed, marketed, prepared and consumed. The vast majority of fresh produce travels over 1200 miles to get to Chicago. Produce is harvested early before it is at peak ripeness, processed at multiple steps and retailed 7-10 days after picking. This leads to a loss of nutritional value and taste all along the chain before it consumed. Because of the standardization of fruit and vegetable production, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization calculated 75% of crop diversity has been lost since 1900. A loss of diversity and genetics never researched for qualities such as disease and pest resistance, drought tolerance, and nutritional benefits. There are many other urban and market trends and motivating factors that have stimulated the urban agriculture movement.

Since its inception in the Spring of 2012 as IPRO 314, UFarmIIT has been adding elements and partners to address the problems of the dominant food system using the opportunities provided by urban agriculture. UFarmIIT is now a student farm, community garden, student organization, test site for technology innovation, and resource for the Bronzeville community. UFarmIIT is providing IIT for urban agriculture and is providing hands on learning opportunities for students.

Similar projects at other universities have started at this basic level and grew over time to become robust programs providing diverse educational opportunities and career pathways for students; incorporating many departments through research, curriculum, and projects; generating revenue through sales, grants and donations; providing access to healthy produce for local communities; and positive attention and differentiation for the universities.

Access to safe healthy fresh food remains an issue in Bronzeville and the immediate areas surrounding IIT. The IIT campus and Bronzeville have underutilized land and wasted green spaces. Student interest continues to grow in urban agriculture and in many of the related issues such as addressing storm water, growing trees for the campus and community, supplying native habitat, improving nutrition and creating living laboratories, are all opportunities for an urban agriculture program to explore.

Since 2012, the IPRO has partnered with: (a) IIT Facilities to reuse wood chips from fallen trees on campus, provide water to the site, develop a site for bees, and secure a space for future aquaponics systems; (b) ARCH First Year studio to design, build and install innovative “living” fence panels; (c) UFarmIIT student group to provides space for alumni, students, staff and faculty for personal garden plots; and (d) St. James Church’s Food Pantry to provide multiple deliveries of surplus produce; the Biology Department Labs for space to grow mushrooms.

Other partnerships and activities in development include building out and launching an aquaponics system on campus; furthering work on an remote sensor system to wirelessly monitor conditions on the farm; working with IFSH to help develop safe handling guidelines for fresh produce and value added products; launching a tree nursery with Facilities; providing space for learning projects for the Boeing Scholars program; and assisting local elementary, middle and high schools with their own gardening programs.

The spring 2015 IPRO team is focused on:
  1. Continuing work on remote sensor system to track and monitor then provide real-time notifications of the growing conditions on the farm while irrigating the farm. Team will also design, construct and install an embedded sensor system at UFarmIIT and the Aquaponics lab.
  2. Working with Schulze & Burch Biscuit Company (35th & South Racine) to develop a plan for adjacent green space including plantings, rainwater collection, irrigation, composting, energy, and structures.
  3. Researching, planning, designing and starting a year round crop production plan with projected harvests and potential income.
  4. Designing, building and testing a new aquaponics system at the Facilities Building (31st and South Federal Street).
  5. Refining an urban agriculture plan for IIT owned empty lot (29th & South State Street)


The summer 2015 IPRO team will concentrate on the following:
  1. Technology Team: Continue work on remote sensor system to track and monitor then provide real-time notifications of the growing conditions on the farm while irrigating the farm. Team will also develop a remote monitoring system for an aquaponics system on or off campus. The system will be integrated with a solar panel array and battery system.
  2. Community Team: Further community work with local Bronzeville gardens and school gardens by extending IIT’s resources out to community partners and thereby to build their capacity and improve production. This includes Bronzeville Urban Agricultural Alliance, and others organizations.
  3. Business Team: Develop processes and procedures for new student run campus enterprise model.
  4. 30th Street Farm Extension: Expand development of IIT farm infrastructure at the 30th Street site. This includes expanding work at the Tree Nursery, developing prototypes for water catchment, composting, furniture, garden beds and vertical growing.


IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-307: Developing Urban Agriculture Facilities at Imani Village (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm. (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Imani Village (Trinity 95th and Cottage Grove Planned Community Development LLC)

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu) and Robert Pontarelli (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

The project sponsor, Trinity 95th and Cottage Grove Planned Community Development, LLC, facilitated by Zeb McLaurin of McLaurin Development Partners, is the owner/developer of a 30 acre, mixed-use development on the far south side of Chicago to be known as Imani Village. Included in the project is a 5 acre site for urban agriculture, and a 35,000 sq. ft. industrial building for use as a Public Market/Food Hub and food wellness education center, to be known as Urban Oasis. Together, the Urban Farm and the Food Hub (Urban Oasis at Imani Village) are intended to be a “social enterprise” and model of and prototype for an “Urban Food System” that serves the Roseland and Pullman Communities, well documented as a Food Desert.

The Urban Food System mentioned above will be supported in concept and program by the Federally Qualified Health Center and the Athletic/Wellness Center also planned for the development. The Urban Farm and Public Market/Food Hub, (Urban Oasis at Imani Village) will serve as a healthy food destination for visitors from across the city and South Suburbs. The specific/appropriate uses and configurations of the Urban Farm and Public Market/Food Hub sites have not yet been finalized, which creates the opportunity for an IPRO team to collaborate with the sponsors and stakeholders to develop conceptual designs for the development.

The IPRO project has several aims that will begin in summer 2015 and likely continue in fall 2015: (1) create a plan for how the Urban Farm and Food Hub segments of the Imani Village Development will be used to create the Urban Food System; (2) develop conceptual designs and recommendations for configuring the spaces; (3) estimate costs of various components; and (4) identify and characterize potential users for the facilities and strategies for engaging them effectively.

As the IPRO team begins its research, it will benefit from input by the Imani Village principals through Patricia Eggleston, Esq, and Dr. Angela Odom-Young, and McLaurin Development Partners. The IPRO team will review various documents available from the sponsor that provide context and guidance: (1) the Imani Village development concept, (2) the Demographic and Statistical Background and Statement of need for Imani village Urban Farm and Public Market/Food Hub, and (3) the master plan for the site developed by the McLaurin team. The research phase will also include a site visit and conversations with individuals and organizations in the communities in proximity to the Imani Village site.

Based on its research findings, the IPRO team will begin to develop guiding principles and specifications for its subsequent conceptual design work for the facilities that will be part of the development, namely, the Urban Farm and the Public Market/Food Hub. At the same time, the framework and input to a business plan will also evolve as part of this process. For example, the IPRO team will propose specific uses for parts of the site that include areas for row crops, hoop houses, farmer's markets, specialty grocery store, farm yield distribution center, community kitchen and or restaurant.

Given the preliminary concepts it develops, the team will work with the sponsor to share early ideas with potential users to determine the level of interest in the proposed uses. Given some evidence of interest and input, the IPRO team will develop more detailed conceptual plans and cost projections. These will be presented to the owner/developer Imani Village and McLaurin for their consideration, and may shape the agenda for future IPRO team projects.

Given the scope of the opportunities for an IPRO Team to contribute creative value to the sponsors and stakeholders, it is likely that this project will continue in the fall 2015 semester.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-308: Urban Activators: Englewood (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 7:40 pm (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Monica Chadha (ARCH) (mchadha1@iit.edu) and Carlo Parente (ARCH) (parecar@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Traditionally, development in neighborhoods has occurred through a long term planning process. These efforts take several years and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to complete. The recommendations from these plans are costly and it is difficult to evaluate the success of the work until it has been actualized. This has been a problematic approach due to its length of time and costs. In our current economic context it is difficult to even justify some of the long term planning efforts without the ability to measure its possibility for success.

A new trend has emerged within communities and neighborhoods. There has been a push to come up with smaller scale, quick and less costly actions that test the ideals of the long term plans. Many call these efforts placemaking. Placemaking is defined as “a multi-faceted approach to the planning, design and management of public spaces” that includes community feedback to discover the needs and aspirations of the community. This is used to create a common vision that can “quickly evolve into an implementation strategy, beginning with small-scale, do-able improvements that can immediately bring benefits to public spaces and the people who use them” (www.pps.org)

The IPRO team will have the opportunity to explore these challenges and ultimately create a toolkit and short term activation that can address the larger issues of economic development. The team will work with its community partner in Englewood on developing a plan and creating display pieces for a ‘think tank’ environment. The team will work the Greater Englewood Development Corporation to understand its needs and develop creative surfaces for the display and integration of brainstorming and community events in their traditional work environment. The team will then work on developing tools for economic revitalization of a currently abandoned storefront at 821 West 63rd Street.

The team will have the opportunity to participate in a meaningful community revitalization project, collaborate with organizations outside of school and create a visual and physical example that reflects a long-term strategic plan. Students do not often have the opportunity to engage with communities outside the school and develop partnerships. This IPRO experience represents a model for projects that are based on the needs identified locally by community organizations and residents. The resulting projects should be able to be supported by the community; the project should not end or cease to exist once the students step away.

The IPRO team will engage with the community, local organizations and city officials to understand local needs and to identify specifics of the project. Through this process, the team will develop a model for community engagement and a participatory design process. Through the course of the semester students will design, build and test a prototype and document their work. The activities and deliverables are outlined below:


    RESEARCH (Week 1)
  1. Become familiar with the work and results of various community development projects through published reports.
  2. Meet and work with representatives from the neighborhood.
  3. Study precedents of pop-up storefront work in other communities and for retail endeavors.

    OUTREACH & SCHEMATIC PLANS (Weeks 2/3)
  4. Work in interdisciplinary teams with residents, community organizations and cottage industries to identify implementation strategies and select specific criteria to meet during the semester.
  5. Explore and implement changes to the think tank space.
  6. Develop three portable proposals and begin a mockup for testing on site. The team will propose project ideas to the community for feedback. Students will have the opportunity to test their ideas against the actuality of what the community is seeking.

    ON-SITE TESTING & FEEDBACK LOOP (Weeks 4/5)
  7. Test the mockups effectiveness.
  8. Solicit feedback from both community organizations and professionals working in the field.
  9. Select a final proposal for fabrication.

    FABRICATION (Weeks 6/8)
  10. Fabricate the selected proposal and place on site.
  11. Develop ‘how-to-guides’.
  12. Provide budget and fabrication plans to the community.


IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-309: IIT Hawk Pride (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Hammond (ID) (stevehammond1@mac.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-309 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-363.]

Spirit and pride are complex phenomena that can make the educational experience more rewarding and satisfying. Developing pride requires cultural and climate shifts for the institution's community and commitment from a wide range of constituencies. This continuing IPRO program explores the complex nature of school pride in all aspects of college life. This IPRO’s history began in athletics and has expanded to other opportunities in the college community. The team will draw on work done by prior IPROs for inspiration. While much of the work will be self-directed, an emphasis will be on projects supporting incoming students and their orientation. We will also consider Summer projects that could enhance the effectiveness of Fall and Spring versions of this IPRO. After developing their own perspective on the challenge, students will develop and implement projects to develop pride in the community.

The objective of this IPRO project is to identify areas where the team can affect pride and engagement at IIT. The opportunity in the Summer term will focus on (1) improving the new student experience and (2) taking Summer term actions that enhance the potential effectiveness of Fall and Spring term efforts. The team will define challenges using techniques from design, creative problem solving and non-directive coaching. Through repetitive use of both generative and evaluative tools, self-directed teams will work to develop solutions that aim to build pride in IIT. The team will learn about innovation processes and will use them to develop its deliverables. A key objective is learning what works, what doesn't and why. Based on progress by prior teams, the scope of the project will likely expand beyond athletics and the on-campus population to include commuters, faculty, alumni and others.

There are several "legacy" threads that would be encouraged for study. One or more of these threads may be required during the term. Previous IPRO teams have identified candidate summer projects and these will be reviewed and considered by the summer 2015 IPRO team. The IPRO team may also develop its own unique focus and work to tap its passion, background and experience.

The team will use a combination of tools used by designers, creative problem solvers and leadership coaches. Each student will be required to manage the agenda and execution of a class session during the term. The students will choose the sub-challenges they wish to pursue and will have opportunities to take on different roles during the project. Teamwork and the dynamics of team formation and learning are an important part of the process.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-310: Design Thinking, Social Innovation and Technology: Balanced Breakthroughs for Social Change (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

TBD (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Amanda Geppert (ID) (amandageppert@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

According to a 2014 report by the Alternative Schools Network both the U.S. and Illinois teen employment rate dropped 27 percent in 2012, continuing to track as the lowest employment rate in the nation’s entire post-World War II history, putting Illinois among the ten highest state jobless rates in the nation. The figures are bleakest for African-American teens in the City of Chicago, where 92 percent of all Black males 16 to 19 years old in Chicago were jobless in 2012.

Working in small teams, students will use a structured approach to social innovation to address this question: How might we increase employment opportunities for Chicago teens?

Students will learn how to apply design research methods to develop socially innovative responses that are desirable and create value for stakeholders, as well as are technologically feasible and economically viable. The emphasis will be on learning through doing — students will engage in problem framing and reframing, research planning, conducting fieldwork (observation, shadowing, interviewing, testing prototypes), analyzing and synthesizing qualitative data, rapid prototyping, as well as developing and communicating solutions. Students should be prepared for an immersive learning experience, as they will engage in fieldwork in a variety of off-campus contexts.

Students who join this IPRO team project will: (a) develop a basic theoretical understanding of social innovation; (b) develop a basic understanding of the implications of different types of information gathering techniques for understanding people and contexts; (c) gain hands-on experience planning and executing field research activities; (d) gain hands-on experience of building fieldwork skills using a variety of methods and tools; and (e) develop and persuasively communicate solutions.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-311: Social Innovation Workshop (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 5:00 to 7:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Social Innovation is the act of developing new ideas, whether concepts, products or services, which positively serve to impact pressing global needs. These are issues that cut across the boundaries of the state, the market and the household. As a result the classic tools of government policy on the one hand, and market solutions on the other, have proved inadequate. As such, over the last 40 years, this gap has prompted the growth of new social ventures, and in particular those that impact the developing world. These ventures, whether grown from a single idea or as a result of long-term service initiatives now span across both public and private markets. They remain distinct in that their production is driven by social values as a primary imperative rather than private financial appropriation.

The Social Innovation Workshop IPRO will serve to leverage the strengths, cross-cutting skill sets (engineering, architecture & design) and on-going IIT curriculum of students and immerse them in the process of social innovation to positively impact some of the world’s most difficult problems – increasing access to energy, improving transport efficiencies, improving agricultural techniques, providing clean water and safer housing, managing waste and reducing chronic disease.

Through a group of professional technical advisors, the team will be led through a desk review and hypotheses development process, product development, business & market planning, field context development, program implementation, performance management & impact evaluation. This will be accomplished within a practical application to a developing world context.

As a result of this experience, those students who participate will not only develop a potentially marketable product, but also round out their education with a greater awareness real-time practice and success in the context of social innovation. As businesses seek to venture into emerging markets and government seeks to tackle the creation of positive living environments, the skill set attained as a result of the social innovation process will prove invaluable in preparing for careers that have meaning. As young graduates enter the professional workforce, there is great potential for individuals to make contributions in one's field as well as through public service and the improvement of living conditions for all.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-371: Using Embedded Systems to Improve Biofuel Combustion Efficiency (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm (Session B from 6/1 to 7/24)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-371 IPRO SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-319.]

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has just issued efficiency and emission standards for wood burning appliances, including wood stoves. There are significant health issues associated with burning wood that affect not only those who own the stoves but those who may live or work in the vicinity and thus breath the emissions.

The EPA standards only apply to new stoves, but there are hundreds of thousands of existing stoves that should be upgraded to meet these standards. According to a recent article in the Chicago Tribune, "About 10 percent of U.S. households burn wood and the number relying on it as their primary heating source rose by nearly a third from 2005 to 2012, the latest year for which figures were available." (Chicago Tribune, Real Estate Section 7, page 1, March 15, 2015). This has significant socio-economic implications, since many "wood-heater" owners represent low-income residents. It is difficult for them to purchase new wood stoves that comply with the EPA's new rules. The concept of a retrofit system to improve wood combustion has potential in allowing existing wood stoves to continue to have a useful life while reducing emissions.

This project is focused to creating hardware and software tools to retrofit existing wood burning stoves so that they are cleaner and more efficient and meet the more stringent EPA standards. It is very difficult to model what is happening in a wood stove. However, it is much simpler to measure what is happening within a working prototype. This can lead to an understanding of the process parameters and how to measure and optimize performance in a retrofitted wood stove system.

This is the second semester of this IPRO project. In the first semester in fall 2014, the IPRO team purchased an inefficient wood burning stove and retrofitted it with a combustor (a catalytic converter for wood stoves) to reduce particulate emissions. The team also designed and installed an embedded system of sensors and fans to improve the efficiency of the stove. The team designed a preliminary testing scheme to test the performance of the system, but did not have the time to conduct exhaustive testing of the system. During the fall 2015 semester, the team will perform more exhaustive testing in order to optimize the system design.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect. (Please note that this IPRO section was inadvertently given an IPRO 497-3xx designation instead of an IPRO 497-2xx designation, and so is still considered to have a "Technological Innovation" concentration.)return to top