IPRO Current Listings for Fall 2015

IPRO 000
IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR FALL 2015
IPRO 397-100
Interprofessional by Design: Digital Service Design -- Exploring App Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-200
Interprofessional by Design: Product Design -- Exploring Product Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-300
Interprofessional by Design: Global Challenges -- Exploring MEDLIFE & Developing Country Needs via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-400
Interprofessional by Design: Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Challenge -- Developing Insights from Large Data Sets that can Inspire Solutions to Human Needs in the Urban Environment (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-500
Interprofessional by Design: Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems -- Improving Livability in Cities via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-600
Interprofessional by Design: AIRchitecture -- Sky is the Limit for Aerospace and Architecture Convergence (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 497-101
Student New Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (A Business Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing new venture concepts through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-102
Student New Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (A Business Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing new venture concepts through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-103
New Venture Design -- Exploring New Venture Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (A Business Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by conceiving new venture ideas through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-104
NEW! The Snow Cruiser Challenge: Inspired (A Business Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster inspired by "orphan" ideas through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-106
NEW! Reimagining Security, Protecting Our Data
IPRO 497-107
NEW! Developing a Campus News Videography Experience
IPRO 497-108
Leveraging Big Data & Analytics for Innovative Access Control Business Opportunities
IPRO 497-201
Automotive Systems Innovation (A Technological Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by incubating and advancing automotive systems concepts through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-202
Mobilus: Robotic Standing Wheelchair with Arm Component (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-203
Reimagining the Turnstile: Improving User Experience, Mitigating Infrastructure Injustice and Assuring Safety and Security for All (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-204
Developing an Antimatter Gravity Interferometer (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-205
Creating (and selling) a Viable Tissue Implant for Human Joints (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-206
Techno-Business User-Application Trends Analysis of US Motor & Transformer Electricity Consumption (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-207
User Interfaces for Novel Computer-Aided Drug Design Tools (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-208
Innovative Structures (Part 2) (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-209
Developing a New Strategy to Detect Smuggled Nuclear Material (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-210
Creating a Metra-CTA Intermodal Link at Ogilvie Transportation Center (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-211
Housing Resiliency Study & Prototype (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-212
Synthesizing and Testing Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Nanomaterials and Investigating Industry Applications and Commercialization Potential (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-213
Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-214
Developing Insights into IIT Electrical & Utility Vault Design, Water Leakage and Corrosion to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Cost (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-215
The Future of Smart Grid: Increasing the Reliability of Sustainable Power (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-218
Use of Treated Wastewater in Buildings: Research on the Relationship Between Cities and Water
IPRO 497-301
Reimagining the STEM Education Experience (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing STEM education through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-302
Managing Projects for Non-Profit Organizations with STEM Missions (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing STEM education through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-303
Made in USA: Developing Concepts to Revitalize Making in America through Insights from Global Manufacturing Trends (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-304
The Bronzeville Community Challenge (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing creative community initiatives through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-305
Community Engagement Innovation (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-306
Urban Agriculture Innovation at IIT (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-307
NEW! Developing Urban Agriculture Facilities at Imani Village (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-310
The STEM Education Innovation Challenge (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing STEM education through collaborative innovation.)

000: IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR FALL 2015

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Meeting Days/Time:

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Appropriate Disciplines:

Description:

Fall 2015 IPRO sections will be listed here by the end of March. At the same time, the IPRO sections will be listed under the subject "Interprofessional Project" by the registrar in the MyIIT portal for registration.

We encourage students contemplating taking a fall IPRO course to come to the IPRO Registration Fair in the MTCC Bridge area on Monday, March 30 from 12 noon to 5 pm to meet instructors and learn more about projects being offered.

IPRO sections are set up with capacity limits and limits on the number of students from the majors that are expected to be most attracted to a specific IPRO project. As a result, it may appear that there are seats available in the registration system; however, some of those seats may be reserved for specific majors in order to best manage the multidisciplinary composition of the team.

If you are unable to register because the section is at capacity or there is any other seat availability restriction by major, you are urged to consider other IPRO sections that interest you. You may also add yourself to the wait list for a closed IPRO section. Students who are waitlisted will be reviewed by the IPRO Program staff and instructor if there is an opportunity to add students to a given IPRO section.

Questions about choosing an IPRO project and IPRO registration can be directed to Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu) or Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu).return to top

397-100: Interprofessional by Design: Digital Service Design -- Exploring App Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Martin Schray (ID/ITM), Hanna Korel (ID) and other instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with the theme of digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with the theme of product design), IPRO 397-300 (Global Challenges), IPRO 397-400 (Data Science & the Urban Experience), IPRO 397-500 (Urban Systems) and IPRO 397-600 (AIRchitecture (a.k.a. Sky's the Limit)). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-100 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-100 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON DIGITAL SERVICE DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing digital services. Students will work in small, interdisciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple digital service.

A service is an intangible product we experience in time through multiple touch-points and channels. According to the US department of commerce services account for 80 percent of the US GDP. However, most services are not that special or distinctive. How was the service the last time you flew? This class will focus on improving service experiences through digital technology. An example of a digital service (since we are talking about flying) is the seat selector application that allows you to pick your seats when you book a flight online. Previous to this digital service you would need to accept whatever seat was assigned to you or call and wait for an agent to help you change your seat. This digital service allows you to change your seat at the time of booking.

Digital services are delivered through a combination of apps, websites, texts, and social media. Shazam, Amazon.com, Citibank mobile banking, and Hulu are examples of digital services. We expect that your team will conceive, design conceptually, and test a simple digital service (more like an app on your phone than Amazon.com). The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

We believe that good services will:
  1. Solve for a real user need and address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Use existing, accessible data;
  3. Are intuitive for the user, i.e., you do not need to read a long manual to understand how to use it;
  4. Solve a discreet problem (confirming I have an appointment with my doctor) not a high level problem (helps me with all aspects of my health); and
  5. Do not require a major advance in coding or computer science in order to be viable.
Digital service design naturally leverages the skills of students majoring in such fields as computer science, information technology and management, professional and technical communication, psychology and business, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and web and app development are encouraged to sign up.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Lead Instructor and Program Director, or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-200: Interprofessional by Design: Product Design -- Exploring Product Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Jim Braband (SSB) and David Ofori-Amorah (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (Digital Service Design), IPRO 397-200 (Product Design), IPRO 397-300 (Global Challenges), IPRO 397-400 (Data Science & the Urban Experience), IPRO 397-500 (Urban Systems) and IPRO 397-600 (AIRchitecture (a.k.a. Sky's the Limit)). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-200 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-200 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON PRODUCT DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing and developing products. Students will work in small, inter-disciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple product. The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

Projects in this class will be student driven: it will be up to you and your team to identify a need and then develop a product that addresses that need. The final deliverable will be a prototype of your concept that demonstrates the benefits of your solution. You will also be responsible for developing a preliminary business plan for the concept. We will provide the guidance and tools for identifying and developing your product, but we have found that these projects are more successful when they are based on student interest.

We believe that good products will:
  1. Solve for a real user need / address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Have ten parts or less (this is about the level of complexity that your team will be able to prototype);
  3. Can fit through a door (this is a good way to keep the scale of the product small); and
  4. Can be prototyped with the resources and funds available to you (each team will have a $500 budget for your prototype, so you likely cannot use exotic materials).
Product design naturally leverages the skills of engineers (e.g., aerospace, biomedical, electrical, mechanical) and architects, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students who are interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and product development (obviously) are encouraged to sign up.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Lead Instructor and Program Director, or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-300: Interprofessional by Design: Global Challenges -- Exploring MEDLIFE & Developing Country Needs via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Hanna Korel (ID) (hanna.korel@gmail.com), Omar Khalil (ChBE) (okhalil@iit.edu) and Douglas Wills (ID) (douglas.wills@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (Digital Service Design), IPRO 397-200 (Product Design), IPRO 397-300 (Global Challenges), IPRO 397-400 (Data Science & the Urban Experience), IPRO 397-500 (Urban Systems) and IPRO 397-600 (AIRchitecture (a.k.a. Sky's the Limit)). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-300 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-300 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON GLOBAL CHALLENGES. This IPRO section is focused to identifying opportunities for new products, services or business models that address global challenges. These challenges may be those articulated by various international or philanthropic organizations, or identified by students or faculty based on their insights or personal experiences. A particular area of focus is to address the needs of developing countries and the world’s poor, but there may be other broad global issues that affect other regions and populations. Programs and organizations that offer perspectives on global challenges include the UN Millenium Project, MEDLIFE, International Development Enterprises (IDE) (http://www.ideorg.org), Engineers Without Borders (EWB), Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW), etc. Global challenge topics may also surface through other venues at IIT, including the Armour College of Engineering themes (health, energy, water, security), Institute of Design workshops, other IPRO team projects, other IIT colleges, etc.

The Global Challenges IPRO section will establish a robust agenda of opportunity areas for student exploration and application of user-centered design methods. One broad area of investigation relates to developing extremely affordable products that can serve the rural poor of the world. The significant challenge facing our global society is to address the needs of the two billion poor in the world who live on less than $3.00 per day and 1 billion of these live on less than $1.00 per day. These two billion suffer from many deficiencies including contaminated water or lack of sufficient water, inadequate shelter and lack of access to affordable and sustainable energy for cooking, heating and other lifesaving and enriching uses like lighting and communications.

It is important that an agenda be developed that broadly offers a good fit between what is needed by the rural poor in developing countries or other global challenge areas, and what our students and faculty can focus on based on our expertise and capabilities and that can create value. In general, the multiple multidisciplinary IPRO teams that are organized through this Global Challenges IPRO section will develop a deep understanding of a particular user need and opportunity through user-centered design methods. This will lead to identifying creative, simple and appropriate solutions that are extremely affordable and can be considered for local manufacture and supply.

The experience of the teams each semester in tackling a specific need and opportunity will help to build an archive of information and experience that can inform future teams about how to identify, select and develop a continuous stream of extremely affordable product concepts over multiple years. This IPRO team therefore will create a legacy of service for the rural poor of the world and the global community at-large through a sustaining IPRO project that future generations of IIT students can participate in.

Members of the team from various disciplines will also learn to use design methods, testing processes and economic and technical review processes to ensure that our solutions have the right cost structure and performance reliability and provide an appropriate solution. Members of the team will also develop their ability to learn and apply good project management practices to mobilize both team and external collaborator resources. Ethical issues arise often in working with and researching the needs and behaviors associated with people in developing countries, and dealing with these ethical issues is a part of participating in this IPRO. There will be significant opportunities to identify and build relationships with external collaborators.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Hanna Korel (hanna.korel@gmail.com), IPRO Lead Instructor, or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-400: Interprofessional by Design: Big Data Science & the Urban Experience Challenge -- Developing Insights from Large Data Sets that can Inspire Solutions to Human Needs in the Urban Environment (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Hammond (ID) (stevehammond1@mac.com), Bo Rodda (ID) and other faculty members TBD, including Computer Science

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (Digital Service Design), IPRO 397-200 (Product Design), IPRO 397-300 (Global Challenges), IPRO 397-400 (Data Science & the Urban Experience), IPRO 397-500 (Urban Systems) and IPRO 397-600 (AIRchitecture (a.k.a. Sky's the Limit)). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-400 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-400 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON BIG DATA SCIENCE & THE URBAN EXPERIENCE The well-known explosion in the volume (scale), variety (types), velocity (speed) and veracity (quality) of data that is being generated by governments, organizations and individuals creates opportunities, challenges and risks that affect all of our lifestyles and standards of living every day. This encompasses financial decision making, decisions about healthcare, safety and security, urban systems, sports and entertainment, social media, etc. The Chicago-area is particularly fruitful for new initiatives centered on data competence and STEM. Chicago is a hub for firms relying on data science and analytics, and its major universities with data science and analytics programs in a range of fields. The City of Chicago has been a national leader in data driven governance, working with companies and academic institutions for innovation in this area.

The growing complexity of the public environment of sensors, data streams, storage, algorithms, visualizations and dashboards, offers a range of possibilities for research. This can lead to insights and inspire innovation, developing tools that help manage these processes, deriving value and minimizing unfavorable consequences to the individual, the economy, society and culture. Over the past few years, this sea change has been popularized through our economy and culture via the notion of “big data.” According to the McKinsey Global Institute (“Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity,” May 2011), “Big data” refers to datasets whose size is beyond the ability of typical database software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze.”

This new IPRO section is inspired by the conviction that data science is the foundation field on which to introduce a progressive, developmental approach to building "data consciousness" into the fabric of learning with a particular focus on STEM. This includes learning how to make decisions based on the best available data, and to discern and understand the meaning of the data they may encounter. Issues of ethics, privacy and security also come into play in a variety of organization settings. The goal is to advance all learners toward higher levels of data competency: data literacy (understanding data and statistical concepts) begins in the early years, data science expertise (designing data science analyses) typically starts in the undergraduate college years, and data science mastery (building data science systems and performing complex analyses) is developed at the graduate school and working professional levels.

The specific big data science challenge theme for fall 2015 is public safety and communication in the urban environment, based on data from the City of Chicago and the communication spectrum research of Vice Provost for Research Dennis Roberson – overlaying the ubiquity of sensor data with that of human activities and experiences. Under this theme, there are a rich array of possibilities for conducting research, extracting insights, brainstorming, developing and prototyping concepts that create value as viewed through three lenses: technical feasibility, user desirability and business viability. The multiple student project outcomes will be presented to and evaluated by civic leaders and professionals with a range of expertise related to the themes.

The IPRO Data Science and the Urban Experience Challenge gives student teams the opportunity to compete in a refereed way. At the end of the semester, the team that has developed the most innovative concept in the realm of data science and the urban experience will be recognized.

In the Data Science and the Urban Experience Challenge, students will be presented with the following challenge: using existing, available large data sets from the city of Chicago as well as spectrum data provided through the IIT research labs of Vice Provost for Research Dennis Roberson, identify key resident issues and then make proposals for new policies, services, and even products to address these issues.

There will be three juried critiques during the semester:
  1. First mid-process presentation: focuses on identifying the best use of large dataset overlays to identify a real resident problem in the City of Chicago (problem framing with data).
  2. Second mid-process presentation: focuses on the proposal for addressing the solution (creative concept development).
  3. Final presentation: summarizes and fine-tunes the information from the first two presentations while also including an element of concept testing.


The teams will be guided along their Data Science & Urban Experience Challenge journey through the following process steps: conducting research (secondary and primary); characterizing user/stakeholder needs; developing specifications; creating a taxonomy; brainstorming concepts; documenting work.

This Data Science and the Urban Experience Challenge will ideally result in healthy competition among IPRO teams as well as recognizing one team for its innovative concept.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (TBD), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Stephen Hammond (stevehammond1@mac.com), IPRO Lead Instructor, or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-500: Interprofessional by Design: Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems -- Improving Livability in Cities via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (Institute of Design) mail@limiashunia.com) and Roberto Cammino (MMAE) (cammino@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (Digital Service Design), IPRO 397-200 (Product Design), IPRO 397-300 (Global Challenges), IPRO 397-400 (Data Science & the Urban Experience), IPRO 397-500 (Urban Systems) and IPRO 397-600 (AIRchitecture (a.k.a. Sky's the Limit)). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-500 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-500 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON LIVABILITY IN CITIES. Cities function because of (or in spite of) urban systems, which can be loosely defined as any collection of independent parts that work together to make cities work better (or not). Examples of such systems include those that provide energy, communications, education, healthcare, water supply, solid waste management, recreation, and transportation. The very notion of “city” is undergoing transformation as new information inhabits and organizes the city and as humans occupy, navigate, and experience it through new protocols. Coupled with evolving green strategies and technologies, this demands that designers and strategists negotiate between increasingly different realities. We must consider the hybrid challenges that will be presented to the practitioner of the near future and for users, individually and collectively, as they adapt.

Students in this multi-team IPRO section will examine the challenges we face in Chicago, now and in the near future, such as increased density, less dependence on non-renewable resources, aging infrastructure and technology, crisis prevention and management, mobility, usable social space, and more (which are also shared by other major metropolises). The innovation teams that are formed through this examination of urban realities will propose creative solutions to those challenges and prototype them. In addition to increasing awareness and understanding of urban problems, students in this IPRO section will learn and develop skills related to team dynamics, project management, economic analysis --- in the context of applying discipline-specific fundamental knowledge and user-centered design and open-ended problem solving methods.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to IPRO instructors Limia Shunia (mail@limiashunia.com) and Roberto Cammino (cammino@iit.edu) or IPRO Program Coordinator, Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-600: Interprofessional by Design: AIRchitecture -- Sky is the Limit for Aerospace and Architecture Convergence (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Alice Kriegel (ID) (akriegel@protostudio.net) and John Manaves (ARCH) (jmanaves@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (Digital Service Design), IPRO 397-200 (Product Design), IPRO 397-300 (Global Challenges), IPRO 397-400 (Data Science & the Urban Experience), IPRO 397-500 (Urban Systems) and IPRO 397-600 (AIRchitecture (a.k.a. Sky's the Limit)). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-600 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-600 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON AIRchitecture (formerly IPRO 346 Sky's the Limit: Retracing the Technological Evolution of Aviation and Its Impact on Architecture.) With over a quarter of a million people flying in the air between ground and space at any given moment, this IPRO continuing project will challenge this mode of temporary existence, researching and developing aerial architecture.

The IPRO team will retrace the technological evolution of aviation and the impact on the designed world rethinking current technologies within architecture and design. In 1891 Alexander Graham Bell began to experiment with the idea of creating heavier than air structures. In this new world the Wright Brother’s winged aviation model of flight is trumped by Alexander Graham Bell’s visions. The emphasis of an elevated ground is explored. A new aerial fiction is produced by hybridizing techniques found in modern aviation with the past. Within this context emerging technologies will be developed and explored. In an attempt to challenge the city, a temporary inhabitable flying platform will be designed and prototyped. The plan is to design a platform that can fly above the tallest towers in the world rethinking the basic principle of the city skyline, the skyscraper.

The project will progress through three phases:

Phase 01 Precedents & Types -- Encompasses research, analysis and documentation of iconic works of architecture that are categorized as aerial projects to better understand historical precedents and how they relate to course interests. A comprehensive categorization and documentation will be created.

Phase 02 Up-Skilling (Overlapping Phase 01) -- Emerging technologies within the field of architecture will be explored and learned. The hacking and reuse of these technologies will assist in the development of phase 03. Software and hardware will be explored, including advanced fabrication techniques.

Phase 03 Aerial Vision & Prototyping -- Prototypes of new proposed structures will be developed using various IIT resources. A team will be developed to explore and test both physical and digital models.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Lead Instructor and Program Director, or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

497-101: Student New Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (A Business Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing new venture concepts through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Nik Rokop (SSB) (nrokop@stuart.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Students interested in enrolling in this IPRO section are urged to contact Prof Nik Rokop to share their interests, ideas and plans for a new venture.

The purpose of this IPRO section is to accommodate and support IIT students who want to create a business during the semester but do not have a framework or support in another credit-bearing format. We also aim to accommodate students who already have a business and want to move it forward while in school and need dedicated and structured time to work on it, as the IPRO course offers. This IPRO section also accommodates previous IPRO teams that desire to take the next step toward making a real world impact through their project and do not yet have a clear path forward.

The objective of this IPRO course is to create a framework whereby students working in small and agile venture teams will (1) learn a repeatable process to successfully start a company; (2) acquire skills in sales, hiring, and operations that can be applied in a startup or in working for a company; (3) learn to successfully motivate resources such as team members, funding, advisors, and mentors; and (4) make measurable progress in taking an idea to a real business, or move an existing business to the next level.

Most of the time will be spent working on the business under the guidance of the IPRO instructors and guests who are relevant industry experts and technology mentors. Working in teams, students will be introduced to the basic processes of starting a business, including legal structures, funding mechanisms, and customer development through reading materials, attending events in the community, and meeting with their mentors. Team members will focus their learning on the appropriate stage of their business but also receive generally applicable knowledge, references and connections. Students will learn to manage intellectual property in both public and private settings.

IPRO 497-1xx sections have a "Business Innovation" concentration with the general aim of launching something into the world that people value. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the business aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Orphan Idea Challenge, Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-102: Student New Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (A Business Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing new venture concepts through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Nik Rokop (SSB) (nrokop@stuart.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Students interested in enrolling in this IPRO section are urged to contact Prof Nik Rokop to share their interests, ideas and plans for a new venture.

The purpose of this IPRO section is to accommodate and support IIT students who want to create a business during the semester but do not have a framework or support in another credit-bearing format. We also aim to accommodate students who already have a business and want to move it forward while in school and need dedicated and structured time to work on it, as the IPRO course offers. This IPRO section also accommodates previous IPRO teams that desire to take the next step toward making a real world impact through their project and do not yet have a clear path forward.

The objective of this IPRO course is to create a framework whereby students working in small and agile venture teams will (1) learn a repeatable process to successfully start a company; (2) acquire skills in sales, hiring, and operations that can be applied in a startup or in working for a company; (3) learn to successfully motivate resources such as team members, funding, advisors, and mentors; and (4) make measurable progress in taking an idea to a real business, or move an existing business to the next level.

Most of the time will be spent working on the business under the guidance of the IPRO instructors and guests who are relevant industry experts and technology mentors. Working in teams, students will be introduced to the basic processes of starting a business, including legal structures, funding mechanisms, and customer development through reading materials, attending events in the community, and meeting with their mentors. Team members will focus their learning on the appropriate stage of their business but also receive generally applicable knowledge, references and connections. Students will learn to manage intellectual property in both public and private settings.

IPRO 497-1xx sections have a "Business Innovation" concentration with the general aim of launching something into the world that people value. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the business aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Orphan Idea Challenge, Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-103: New Venture Design -- Exploring New Venture Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (A Business Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by conceiving new venture ideas through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jessica Barnes (ID) (barnes@id.iit.edu), Douglas Wills (ID) (wills.douglas@gmail.com) and Erik VanCrimmin (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

IIT students currently have a variety of individual entry points across the university for exploring their ideas, obtaining support and even forming a team to further develop their concepts. The purpose of this IPRO section is to inspire and encourage new venture concepts in a dynamic, multi-team workshop environment that cultivates interaction, serendipitous connections, breakthrough thinking, and a touch of competitive spirit.

This IPRO section will be organized in small, agile multidisciplinary teams. The teams will be guided through the application of user-centered design methods, with an overarching balance of attention to user desirability, technical feasibility and business viability. Teams that are formed will be guided through the innovation process that begins with problem/opportunity definition and research, emphasizes ethnographic research, identifies driving insights, inspires brainstorming and promotes iterative prototyping with user feedback.

The IPRO teams organized in this section will become relentless and tenacious in properly framing possibilities, methodical and self-disciplined in developing valid and reliable data and insights, and creative and opportunistic in recognizing and capitalizing on driving insights. The aim is to inspire collaborative innovation that creates value and a path forward for teams to advance their concepts.

IPRO 497-1xx sections have a "Business Innovation" concentration with the general aim of launching something into the world that people value. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the business aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Orphan Idea Challenge, Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-104: NEW! The Snow Cruiser Challenge: Inspired (A Business Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster inspired by "orphan" ideas through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Hammond (ID) (stevehammond1@mac.com) and Tony Bynum (ID) in collaboration with IIT Marketing and Communications

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Presentation Video:

Click to View

Description:

IIT is connected to some of the world’s greatest inventions. The cell phone. Bar code technology. Magnetic recording. You’ve probably heard of them.

What about the Snow Cruiser?

Invented at Armour Institute of Technology’s Research Foundation in 1939, the Snow Cruiser was poised to chart a new course in Antarctic exploration. The 55-foot-long mobile laboratory on wheels was designed to house Admiral Richard E. Byrd and his team on his third expedition to the continent. Popular Science touted it “as fantastic as a product of Jules Verne’s brain.”

Unfortunately, the Snow Cruiser was a dud. Even before it arrived at its destination it experienced a number of issues—from getting stuck under a Chicago underpass to hitting a bridge and then driving into a creek in Ohio. Upon docking at the snowy continent, one of its wheels broke through a wooden ramp as it was being unloaded from the carrying ship. Once on land the Snow Cruiser traveled one mile before sinking into the snow.

Although Byrd reported that his expedition discovered “900 miles of unknown coastline that explorers had been seeking for a hundred years,” the Snow Cruiser remained mostly stationary and was abandoned in 1940. After a 1958 rediscovery mission it was officially lost in the snow. View the video provided above as well!

How would you build a better Snow Cruiser?

On this 75th anniversary of the Snow Cruiser — also IIT’s 125th anniversary year — this special IPRO section challenges you to put your creativity and design/build skills to the test by reimagining the Snow Cruiser for the 21st Century!

The Snow Cruiser Challenge is a friendly competition inspired by the Snow Cruiser project of the Research Foundation of the Armour Institute of Technology in the late 1930’s. Using the Snow Cruiser project as inspiration, student teams will develop innovative concepts based on ideas generated from studying the Snow Cruiser’s history.

Student teams will begin by researching the Snow Cruiser project in order to get a historical perspective. The teams will then use a variety of processes to use the Snow Cruiser as inspiration for their projects. Depending on their interests, teams may explore a variety of points-of-view, for example:
  1. Failure analysis of the project
  2. Geopolitical aspects of the project
  3. History of exploration that led to the project
  4. Design and build cycles of the project and their effect on it.
  5. Other novel viewpoints discovered during research.
The teams will then develop and frame a problem or challenge to be addressed. New ideas to address the challenge will be developed, prototyped and evaluated during the course of the semester.

There will be three critique sessions during the semester:
  1. Research and challenge presentation: focuses on identifying the opportunity area and defining the challenge (problem framing with data).
  2. Idea Generation and Development: focuses on identifying, choosing and developing a potential solution, including initial prototyping or concept generation (creative concept development).
  3. Refinement and Implementation: uses prototyping feedback to fine-tune the concept and updates the prototype/concept. It also effectively communicates the project for the Final Presentation and IPRO Day.
The teams will be guided along their journey through the following process steps: conducting research (secondary and primary); characterizing user/stakeholder needs; developing specifications; creating a taxonomy; brainstorming concepts; developing solutions/prototypes; and documenting/communicating their solutions.

This Snow Cruiser Challenge experience will ideally result in healthy competition among IPRO teams as well as recognizing teams for their innovative approaches or solutions to advancing an idea inspired by the Snow Cruiser's history.

IPRO sections that are designated as having a "Business Innovation" concentration will have the general aim of launching something into the world that people value. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the business aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-106: NEW! Reimagining Security, Protecting Our Data

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

W.W. Grainger, Inc.

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu) in consultation with Department of Psychology

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Note that this IPRO section enrollment is by permit only. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor, Professor Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu) to directly express interest in joining this research project team, sharing how they feel they can contribute to the success of the project and what they hope to gain from the experience. This IPRO project can be particularly attractive to students who wish to gain rigorous experience in an authentic client-based project, working closely with information security and human resources functions of an organization.

Cyber-Security has become a very popular topic over the past decade. Given all of the Credit Card breaches that have been occurring recently, organizations are establishing a more aggressive and pro-active posture, making security one of the top priorities that enables growth of their business. Grainger is committed to best serve its customers by protecting their information. Policies and procedures are in place to support this commitment. However, some best practices are more behavioral than technical; hence, a Security Awareness program was created to help build a strategy around educating Grainger's team members about best practices regarding physical and cyber security. The program intends to reduce the different risks associated with day-to-day operations and strengthen the security posture.

There are three main goals for this IPRO project. The ultimate outcome for this IPRO project is a portfolio of ideas around a Security Awareness Roadmap for what the IPRO team members think is applicable to them and what would be applicable to a corporate environment that consists of employee team members from a wide range of backgrounds, expertise, and generations. secondly, in the course of its research, it is expected that the IPRO team will identify contemporary best practices of a variety of organizations for protecting data. The characteristics and parameters of various security programs and the ideas generated by the IPRO team can be summarized and compared via a decision matrix or other benchmarking tool. Third, it is important for the team to identify ways to measure the success of any proposed components of a Security Awareness Roadmap over time, once implemented, by using appropriate evaluation metrics.

IPRO sections that are designated as having a "Business Innovation" concentration will have the general aim of launching something into the world that people value. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the business aspect.

Note that this IPRO section enrollment is by permit only. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor, Professor Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu) to directly express interest in joining this research project team, sharing how they feel they can contribute to the success of the project and what they hope to gain from the experience. This IPRO project can be particularly attractive to students who wish to gain rigorous experience in an authentic client-based project, working closely with information security and human resources functions of an organization.return to top

497-107: NEW! Developing a Campus News Videography Experience

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

JM Downey (ID) (downeyj1@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

[This IPRO project is a continuation of IPRO 497-364 from Spring 2015. Registration for this IPRO section is by permit only by contacting both Elvin Moy (emoy3@hawk.iit.edu), student founder of this IPRO project, and IPRO instructor JM Downey (downeyj1@gmail.com) to share the reasons for your interest in this project and how your background can contribute to the project's success.]

IIT is a diverse community of cultures and interests that spans the student body university leadership, faculty, staff, alumni and other stakeholders. Each student has the task of keeping informed regarding matters that affect their academic and social lives. However, with all the demands placed on students today, keeping in the loop and informed is no small task.

With the dominance of social media and mobile access to data, people today expect engaging, video-driven entertainment and information to supplement their media consumption and daily lives. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube (to name a few) have changed the way we seek information and create interaction with others. These highly social and virtual real-time forms of communication offer an outlet for sharing experiences and expression.

This IPRO project is focused to improving communication across the university through the technique of videography. More specifically, employing the power of video storytelling to enable individual students to capture the happenings and conversations that are going on at IIT and in Chicago, and the ability to connect and share with the community at large.

The first objective will be for the team to articulate a purpose and mission for a videography capability and experience at IIT and explore how we can leverage existing channels and capabilities to reach audiences. This would lead to investigating best practices associated with news capture, interviewing, editing, archiving, etc. An emphasis on storytelling, branding, production, and professionalism will be key to creating content for the IIT campus that will be trusted and respected.

Once research has been completed, a mission established and a framework of operation created, the team can consider the range of videography scenarios and how to build competency for anyone wishing to submit content. This can be accomplished by members of the team doing prototyping of the videography experience in areas of interest to them. The sub-teams doing the prototyping will gain experience in planning, executing interviews, editing and publishing their work. Ranging from individuals and organizations on campus, to exhibits and events throughout the city, this IIT videography service/experience has the potential to enrich, inspire and involve all of our students.return to top

497-108: Leveraging Big Data & Analytics for Innovative Access Control Business Opportunities

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

The Chamberlain Group of Duchossois Industries

Faculty:

TBA in consultation with Bo Rodda (ID) and other faculty as appropriate

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

The Chamberlain Group (CGI), a global leader of access systems such as garage door, commercial door and gate operators, has created MyQ Connectivity technology that has been successfully introduced by leading retailers and garnered partnerships with key technology innovators such as Apple, Google-Nest, Wink and Alarm.Com. In addition to its current residential space (B2C) offerings, CGI is looking to expand its connectivity platform to its other commercial and connected automotive businesses (B2B) and sees “Big Data and Analytics” as a key enabling technology.

This IPRO project will explore new opportunities for leveraging big data and analytics for consumer, commercial and automotive connectivity products, services and apps that enhance the overall experience as a natural extension of Chamberlain’s MyQ platform providing safety, security and peace of mind. The team will incorporate sound research, trends and insights and conceive viable frameworks and concepts that can drive business growth. The project investigation should include:
  1. Understanding consumer, industry & technology insights and trends related to the application of big data and analytics;
  2. Adapting existing algorithms, coding new ones or both to solve real world problems, address developed use cases and further MyQ platform growth opportunities;
  3. Identifying resources required, potential partnerships or both to implement the proposed concept(s);
  4. Demonstrating technical feasibility, consumer/customer desirability and business viability;
  5. Clearly identifying paths for "monetization," leveraging known or new business models;
  6. Developing “proof of principle” prototypes of the final concept(s).
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497-201: Automotive Systems Innovation (A Technological Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by incubating and advancing automotive systems concepts through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu) and Darren Peterson (ID) (darren.g.peterson@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-201 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-313]

In Spring 2015, the project "Refuelable Electric Vehicles" expanded into a full multi-IPRO themed cluster to accommodate student interest. The teams have been focusing on four projects: (1) Refuelable electric vehicles; (2) Internally cooled fast-charging battery for vehicles; (3) Adaptive-cycle hybrid vehicles and (4) Hover-car. The Adaptive-cycle and Internal cooling teams have further organized in smaller, more specialized teams. There is also a Business team coordinating all of the effort. This organization model for a high-tech corporation or corporate R&D laboratory, tackling several advanced concepts for possible introduction in the market, will be carried forward for fall 2015.

For fall 2015, some of the above projects may continue, while new ones will be added in order to drop those that don't appear to have potential and add those that look promising. The projects generally involve hardware prototyping and testing of solutions. There is also considerable opportunity to interact with sponsors and suppliers, which benefits the entire multi-IPRO team experience. There is regular opportunity for members of each team to give updates to all teams on progress and challenges. This involves everyone in a collaborative way to suggest approaches to solving problems and helping each other achieve goals.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-202: Mobilus: Robotic Standing Wheelchair with Arm Component (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Kevin Meade (MMAE) (meade@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-202 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-350]

How can individuals with limited mobility handicaps be more independent? Modern mobility devices, especially wheelchairs, are limited in their capabilities. Long-term sitting can lead to both health and social problems, and much of the body is kept so stationary that any chances of healing are greatly reduced. I know that a new wheelchair design could increase a handicapped person’s independence, as well as improve both their quantity and quality of life.

There is a segment of the population which doesn’t fit into the binary condition of either being in a wheelchair or not being in one. There is more variety to what people need. The elderly and infirm can suffer a very slow decline over many years. Other diseases just result in a very slow recovery. An afflicted person needs to be able to stand, or at least sit in an upright position, to interact with the world, maintain independence and keep mobile and active. This is what we want to design a new wheelchair to address. Using our education and skills to help the handicapped gain independence and increase their ability to heal is a meaningful challenge we intend to address.

Robert Wootten, the father of current IIT ME major Sady Wootten, has been a mechanical engineer with Ball Aerospace for over thirty years. Because of his avocation for sculpturing, he became acquainted with a sculptor with multiple sclerosis. This led to Mr. Wootten’s efforts to design a wheelchair that could support a disabled person in a standing position so that s/he could have greater range and flexibility for various activities. Prototypes were built but have not been refined and much work needs to be done so that an articulating wheelchair can be manufactured.

IIT students now have the opportunity to reimagine and advance the project, refine and modernize its design, build new prototypes and advance toward user-testing. The IPRO project began with the spring 2015 semester and is expected to continue for at least two additional semesters. Ultimately, the goal is to have a working prototype wheelchair that allows a user to: (1) Get in and out of the chair without assistance from another person; (2) Make use of a motorized system that can provide the user with an elevated sitting position or fully supported standing position; (3) Adjust the back support, seat angle, footplate and arm supports independently to maintain comfort; (4) Use different elements of the chair in a manner that functions as mild physical therapy and keeps the user’s muscles from atrophying; (5) Design an upper limb orthosis that can be attached to the wheelchair and address a subject’s need for forearm supination.

The first semester of this IPRO project in spring 2015 focused on wheelchair design and analysis. The team conducted secondary research, including current wheelchair solutions and ergonomics. The team created conceptual designs and applied ergonomic solutions. The primary goal for the end of the first semester is to have a complete design with CAD drawings and a list of parts. The drawings would be dimensioned for the parts that require fabrication, and a bill of materials prepared. Additionally, the team intends to code and ready the necessary R-Net controller software so that parts can be made or ordered over summer 2015.

The second semester of the IPRO project for fall 2015 will focus on construction, testing, documenting results, and redesigning for improvements. Students will be organized into the same team structure as the Fall 2015 semester. The Prototype Redesign Team will focus on building, testing and revising the prototype wheelchair. The Arm Component Design Team will focus on prototyping their design of the supinating arm component with two modes: one to assist motion, the other to resist motion in order to provide physical therapy. The User-Centric Design Team will focus on the overall problem from the ethnographical perspective in order to provide support to the other teams. It will also support research and reporting the results of the project.

The overarching goals for Fall 2015 are: (1) to construct working prototypes of the wheelchair and arm orthosis, and (2) begin field-testing of the prototypes with our subject. Field-testing of the arm orthosis can be done in the classroom. It is anticipated that initial field-testing of the standing function of the wheelchair will take place in the Crawford Auditorium of The John T. Rettaliata Engineering Center (E1) during the subject’s lectures.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-203: Reimagining the Turnstile: Improving User Experience, Mitigating Infrastructure Injustice and Assuring Safety and Security for All (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Hans Mickelson (ID) (hans@id.iit.edu) in consultation with Noah McClain (SOCSCI) (nmcclain@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

[THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION WILL BE UPDATED TO REFLECT THE ANTICIPATED FOCUS FOR THE FALL 2015 IPRO TEAM BASED ON THE WORK OF THE SPRING IPRO TEAM (FORMERLY LISTED AS IPRO 497-309)]

The fare-control infrastructure of turnstiles in the Chicago El were designed for idealized users who travel without paraphernalia or children, fit certain bodily expectations, have no disability, and do not ever need to enter or exit the El in a personal or mass emergency. By result, El users face objects which may add to their burdens rather than meet their needs in human-object interactions which take place millions of times per year in Chicago (as well as in the many cities and institutions which have adopted similar infrastructure, from the New York Subway to stadiums and theme parks across the county). This IPRO project will seek entwined engineering, design, technical and policy solutions to address this mismatch between turnstile infrastructure versus the actual needs of the riding population and the purposes to which they put the El.

In the 1990's, the Chicago Transit Authority introduced two new types of turnstile in the El. The first most closely resembles a traditional turnstile with one horizontal barrier. The second – the focus of this project - is a full-body enclosure which allows both ingress and egress, known as the High Entry/Exit Turnstiles (or HEET). For the CTA, the HEETs offered a solution to subway entrances which are not monitored full-time by CTA personnel because they physically restrict most forms of fare-evasion but still provide entry and exit capacity. Yet while HEETs are problem-solving instruments for the CTA, they may perpetuate or introduce certain new problems for riders: Though the HEET was designed to accommodate human users, users were conceptualized with the body measurements of naked, male members of the U.S. military. Though the HEET was designed to accommodate individual commuters using the El in an orthodox fashion, they were not designed to facilitate the myriad purposes and configurations through which the system is used – including families laden with paraphernalia, creating the risk that children and caregivers can be separated from one another due to malfunction. Though the HEETs were designed to be useable by fit adults, they do not anticipate the possible frailty or disability of users. These problems suggest a need for alternative turnstile objects or fare-control systems which retain some fare-control properties, but which can be overridden in true emergency; objects or systems which hew closer to principles of universal design, and revisions which accommodate some of the less-acknowledged, but central use-values riders extract from the El, such as: a proxy for moving vans, school busses, emergency shelter, and airport shuttle.

While team members will organize in groups to identify socially-beneficial modifications to fare-control infrastructure and/or its administrative or architectural contexts, the primary objective of the IPRO project will be the learning process entailed in: collaboratively identifying the scope of an issue which is simultaneously social, material, architectural and administrative; engaging in collaborative research and development on multiple fronts according to environmental, material, practical and legal constraints; advancing potential alternatives solutions through discussion, experimentation, collective critique, prototyping, the pursuit of promising avenues; and recognizing significant findings through group analysis and engagement with external critics. A second important objective is to curate and distill the team's work so that a possible subsequent team of students to learn from the successes and instructive efforts of this first semester turnstile design IPRO team.

The team will initially (a) investigate the scope of the problem by engaging in systematic observational research where populations interact with HEETS, and on the Chicago El in general and (b) investigate the legal, material and technical constraints to which the HEETs are answerable. With a grasp of the problem and of the existing constraints for solutions, team members will draw from their varied orientations and skill sets to investigate feasible modifications to the HEET objects, their environmental contexts, and/or to the existing constraints. Potential avenues of investigation will be dependent on the orientations and ideas the students bring to the course, with some possibilities proposed by the instructor as well as by related pilot work already done by a fellow IIT student in the summer of 2014. However, the instructor will encourage students to deploy their collective capacities to propose ways to confront the problem and test potential solutions through policy research, design, prototyping and (if possible) in situ experimentation.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-204: Developing an Antimatter Gravity Interferometer (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Daniel Kaplan (PHYS) (kaplan@iit.edu) and Derrick Mancini (PHYS)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-204 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-305]

Does antimatter fall up? The science-fictional idea of antigravity is now being taken seriously by a number of researchers around the world. We will develop a novel experimental apparatus to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter.

Einstein's General Relativity, the accepted theory of gravity, predicts no difference whatsoever between the gravitational behaviors of matter and antimatter. While well-established experimentally, General Relativity has never been tested with antimatter. If antimatter is found to fall up in the gravitational field of the Earth -- or even if it falls down, but at a different rate from matter -- it will fundamentally change our view not only of gravity but of the nature and evolution of the Universe.

The measurement will require a source of neutral antimatter atoms and a precision device to measure their motion under gravity. Our approach is to use muonium -- a hydrogen-like atom composed of an antimuon bound to an electron. (Although the electron is matter, since the antimuon is 200 times heavier than the electron, muonium should act gravitationally like antimatter.) Muonium sources exist at a number of particle accelerator laboratories around the world. Since muonium decays on average in 2.2 microseconds, the measurement is difficult and requires extreme mechanical precision.

The IPRO team will develop a precision interferometer using thin silicon gratings made at Argonne National Laboratory using nanotechnology fabrication techniques. This IPRO project started in the fall 2014 semester and continued in spring 2015, with significant progress being made. The team will build on that progress by (if not already done) building gratings, characterizing their precision (and, if necessary, figuring out how to improve it), and carrying out further design and simulation studies in order to understand and optimize the performance of the experiment as a whole.

This project can use collaborating students from many fields of study, e.g., physics, engineering, computer science, and applied math.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-205: Creating (and selling) a Viable Tissue Implant for Human Joints (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 5:00 to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Forelight, Inc. (University Technology Park) and Matrix Odyssey LLC

Faculty:

Joseph Orgel (BIO) (orgel@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-205 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-316]

Note that this IPRO section enrollment is by permit only. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor, Professor Joseph Orgel (orgel@iit.edu) to directly express interest in joining this research project team, sharing how they feel they can contribute to the success of the project and what they hope to gain from the experience. This IPRO project can be particularly attractive to students who wish to gain rigorous experience in an authentic applied research environment, working closely with IIT research faculty and other professionals in a biotech type start-up environment.

Creating (and selling) a viable tissue implant for human jointsHuman joints are vulnerable to incidental or sports injury. The wear and tear effects of normal aging and the severe disease arthritis effects tens of millions a year as a severe disease and effects all humans to some significant degree during their lifetime. Current strategies for treatment of severe joint damage, require whole or partial joint replacement and rely on animal or human postmortem joint transplants that introduce immunological and disease contamination concerns. Other strategies that make use of non-natural, plastic, polymer, short-peptide based fibrils, carbon-nanotube or even silks lack the molecular functionalization and / or 3-D organization that the hosts cells need to properly populate and integrate the implant.

We propose to make use of a technology developed by IIT scientists (Patent applied for) that avoids these fundamental problems. It is based on in vitro re-engineered vertebrate tissues that are decellularized, making an immunologically neutral matrix that also more accurately represents the natural structures needed for the transplant recipients cells to recognize and populate as part of the tissue repair process.

Bringing such a product to a point that it sees use is a significant challenge. This project will take students through the general steps a start-up research and development company must go through to realize its objectives.

The team will have the benefit of collaborating with professionals representing two start-up organizations. Matrix Odyssey LLC is a company founded by experts in the structure, organization and biology of the mammalian ECM, is a translational and commercialization research focused entity specializing in cartilage repair technology and the rational design of ECM biomaterials. ForeLight, Inc, (situated in the IIT University Technology Park) produces biomaterials for the life sciences, nutritional and agricultural industries using their Illumesis™ photosynthetic growth platform - a modular, scalable artificial bioreactor that provides uniquely controllable conditions for consistent, stable and cost-effective commercial indoor production.

The objective of this IPRO project over one or more semesters is to design and implement a system for creating custom implants made from re-engineered tissues that may become commercially viable products. This will build on the work of Matrix Odyssey LLC (IIT associated company) and Forelight Inc, which have developed the basis for making this objective a reality. Their work includes the production of re-engineered material and its deposition into viable (repair) cartilage implant plugs. What is expected to be achieved with this project, is the development of a production system that could be thought of as a step towards 3D printing of tissue scaffolds.

The IPRO team will be ideally comprised of students majoring in engineering (biomedical, electrical, computer, materials, mechanical, chemical), sciences (biology, chemistry, physics), business, and interested students from other fields will form small task-orientated workteams that collaborate and share progress each week to address the task areas described below that are building on the work of the spring 2015 IPRO team:

MODULE 1 WORKTEAM: NOZZLE SPRAY DESIGN & PROTOTYPING. Construct a nozzle spray (the 'print head') specifically designed to work with the new tissue technology rather than simple, small polymers. This requires research into flow speed, pressure and necessary assembly. The team will start with simple manual hydrophilic and syringe systems to develop the most efficient volume and substrate mixtures working upwards to calibrate the pump systems (Mixed team of scientists and engineers).

MODULE 2 WORKTEAM: CONTROL SYSTEM SOFTWARE/HARDWARE INTEGRATION. Develop a control system for Module 1 that incorporates custom developed computer code and small scale equipment building on knowledge gained in Module 1. This requires conceptualization and identification of technology, control circuitry and software to control pump speed, pressure and mixing (Mixed team of engineers and computer scientists).

MODULE 3 WORKTEAM: STERILIZER DESIGN & PROTOTYPING. Design and construct a sterilizer based on a UV illumination array that may safely be applied to the pump system to help prevent bacteriological growth. This requires conceptualization and identification of illumination technology that integrates with Modules 1 and 2, and requires research to identify the best positioning for an anti-bacteriological illumination solution and consideration of relative effectiveness of such positions in the system. (Mixed team of engineering, physics, etc.).

MODULE 4 WORKTEAM: CELL GROWTH STUDIES. Conduct cell growth studies on material produced from Module 1 and then Modules 2 and 3. Requires testing of desired cell growth on substrate, deposited substrate (prospective implant product) and testing of undesired bacteriological growth (product control) in concert with Modules 1-3. Standard mammalian and bacteriological cell growth kits will be used (Mixed team of life scientists and biomedical engineers).

MODULE 5 WORKTEAM: MARKET RESEARCH. Conduct market research to inform (a) product placement, (b) possible valuation of technologies, and (c) identification of competing technologies. This requires an organized market and competitive research study based on publicly available product information, analysis of published patents and patent applications, and phone conversations with both potential buyers and sellers of possible competing products to produce a comparative product and market segmentation analysis. (Mixed team of business and other disciplines).

IPRO sections that are designated as having a "Technological Innovation" concentration will have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.

Note that this IPRO section enrollment is by permit only. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor, Professor Joseph Orgel (orgel@iit.edu) to directly express interest in joining this research project team, sharing how they feel they can contribute to the success of the project and what they hope to gain from the experience. This IPRO project can be particularly attractive to students who wish to gain rigorous experience in an authentic applied research environment, working closely with IIT research faculty and other professionals in a biotech type start-up environment.return to top

497-206: Techno-Business User-Application Trends Analysis of US Motor & Transformer Electricity Consumption (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Tempel Steel

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com) in consultation with Ian Brown (ECE) (ibrown1@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-206 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-356]

New Electric Motor Efficiency Standards become effective in the next few years. The new standards are directed by three governing bodies: the US Department of Energy, the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association and the International Electrotechnical Commission. Motor manufacturers have multiple design approaches to achieve higher efficiency. Tempel Steel Corporation, a motor lamination producer, seeks the assistance of an IPRO team to research, design and document the impact of lamination design and stacking on efficiency improvement.

The objective of the fall 2015 IPRO team is to recommend lamination design changes that Tempel could suggest to its customers, thereby enabling motor manufacturers to comply with the new standards.

The fall 2015 semester will be the third semester of this project. It is expected the fall 2015 IPRO team will advance and implement the work of the previous teams. This includes (a) applying finite element analysis to lamination design, (b) implementing a freshly configured Lab View to the Test Dynamometer, and (c) analyzing the resultant data to confirm the impact lamination changes have on achieving improved efficiency. The first semester (Fall 2014) IPRO team researched new standards and recommended four approaches to achieving higher efficiency: improve steel grade, change steel thickness, add stack length and change lamination design. The second semester currently underway (Spring 2015) is applying finite element analysis to evaluate steel and the impact of increased stack length, configure Lab View to collect and analyze test data, and design and assemble a Dynamometer to test the new motor design.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-207: User Interfaces for Novel Computer-Aided Drug Design Tools (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

David Minh (CHEM) (dminh@iit.edu) and Stan Ruecker (ID) (sruecker@id.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Information Design, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

A key aspect of pharmaceutical research and development is drug design - engineering a molecule with just the right properties to treat a disease without harming the body. Researchers in IIT's chemistry department are developing a new computer program to improve predictions about whether or not a molecule will bind to its intended target. Presently, the program does not have a user-friendly interface. Graphical user interfaces could enable more molecular engineers to access our cutting-edge algorithms, ultimately accelerating drug discovery.

The objective of the IPRO project is to design, implement, and test one or more graphical user interfaces for our program, AlGDock (https://github.com/ccbatiit/algdock/). The interfaces may be designed for different platforms including the world wide web, a stand-alone computer program, or an app for a tablet or smart phone.

As a first step, the team will choose a platform and build a minimal interface capable of submitting jobs to a computing cluster using existing files. The team will also develop ways to visualize results. The team will then add additional features, including the ability to draw molecules from scratch or edit existing molecules.

The prototype interfaces will be tested by non-programmers in academic and/or industrial chemistry laboratories involved in drug design. Future semesters may include development of new features and implementation across different platforms. As with AlGDock, the programs will be made available through an open-source MIT license. This license will facilitate use, enable future teams to build upon the programs, and allow contributors to establish a public portfolio of design/programming/project management.

Given the broad project purpose outlined above, the IPRO team will take the initiative in developing realistic goals based on their background and experience, achieve them in a timely manner by the end of the semester, and lay the foundation for continuing work through future IPRO teams. We anticipate that the IPRO team will learn and use brainstorming and iterative prototyping techniques, write and document software code, and test the user interface programs with intended users. The team will have the opportunity to communicate with algorithm developers (our research group) as well as potential users in pharmaceutical research laboratories. Based on the above, an interdisciplinary IPRO team is highly desirable, including disciplines that span user interface story boarding and design, software development, user testing, and molecular science.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-208: Innovative Structures (Part 2) (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Chicago Council of Carpenters, Icynene Spray Foam Products

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmkinn5@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering

Description:

INQUIRY: Is the construction industry evolving effectively with new innovations and technologies taking place within and outside of its boundaries? Further, is it appropriately endeavoring to make buildings affordable and environmentally responsible?

RESPONSE: A laboratory test in 2007 at the University of Florida demonstrated that the use of closed-cell spray foam in conventional frame construction resulted in a 4x lateral strength improvement of the structure. This IPRO project will take the next step and re-evaluate conventional floor frame construction in light of the spray foam structural benefits -- along with other relevant techniques and innovations -- with the goal of creating a low cost, holistically sustainable and state-of-the-art floor system.

CONSTRUCTION PRACTICE: The Floor / Ceiling will challenge (in material and composition) the convention of frame construction by merging fundamental structural techniques of bent plate, the arch, diaphragm, cross-bracing, bridging, tensioning, cantilever, web+flange, etc. with new technologies of spray foam (structural, thermal and moisture protection values), 3D printing / (pre)fabrication, high-performance / recycled / alternative materials, etc.

The objective is to establish a cost effective floor / ceiling system that meets the traditional performance criteria (thermal, moisture, structural) and current sustainability requirements. Lower-cost systems translate to more affordable buildings and to be sustainable is to be environmentally responsible.

This IPRO project will be a very hands-on, mock-up oriented course and a great opportunity for the disciplines of architecture, structural / civil engineering, architectural engineering, material science, environmental engineering, chemical engineering, etc., to interact and explore a design, construction and innovation challenge.

This Construction Practice IPRO project pushes the limits of convention -- in material and thinking -- through a calculated, trial and error process including, but not limited to: (1) research, (2) analysis, (3) linear & non-linear / creative thinking, (4) hands-on interaction & mock-ups with materials and tools, (5) testing, and (6) iteration of the above cycle as necessary to converge on innovative concepts.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-209: Developing a New Strategy to Detect Smuggled Nuclear Material (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Zack Sullivan (PHYS) (zack.sullivan@iit.edu) and Dan Kaplan (PHYS) (kaplan@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

While millions of cargo containers enter the United States each year, no effective mechanism is in place to prevent the delivery of smuggled nuclear weapons or materials to our ports and internal transportation system. In this IPRO, we will explore the use of beams of charged particles to scan cargo containers from a significant distance and determine whether they contain illicit nuclear materials before they reach our cities.

These materials are designated as “fissile,” i.e., able to sustain a nuclear-fission chain reaction, and the particles we propose to use in the beam are muons — heavier “cousins” of electrons — which are nearly ideal for our purpose. Muons are able to penetrate thick layers of material, and were famously used to “X-ray” the pyramids of Giza.

When muons come to rest in uranium, plutonium, or other fissile atoms, they cause characteristic gamma rays to be emitted whose wavelengths are a unique “fingerprint” of the atom in question. Demonstration projects using muons produced in the atmosphere have successfully found hidden fissile materials; however, the rate of atmospheric muon production is thousands of times too small for practical use. Recent progress in muon accelerator technologies can solve the rate problem. Thus there is an opportunity to develop an effective solution to identify suspect containers before they reach shore.

The principles underlying muon-based fissile-material detection systems are well understood. But there are several practical, technical, fiscal, ethical, and societal questions that must be answered before deployment of such systems could be considered. For example, what beam parameters are needed — e.g., what are cargo containers made of, how are they loaded, and what does this imply about the needed muon energy? Is it better to use a single muon energy or to scan over a range of energies to distinguish different materials? What energies and intensities are required in order to identify specific materials via either gamma ray emission from captured muons or (as was done for the pyramids) via muon tomography?

One significant concern we would like to address is the radiation safety of the device. What is the maximum intensity and time we can use to scan a container, given that a stowaway could conceivably be hiding in it? What are the ethical and regulatory limits to implementing this technology if there is some possibility of exposing such individuals to radiation? How do we address the public in order to explain both the methods used and importance of this device, while allaying possible concerns regarding issues of safety?

Many other practical questions abound that will impact the design and feasibility of this device. We anticipate that participants in this IPRO experience will identify and determine the significance of many we have not even considered.

Depending on the interests and capabilities of the students who enroll, teams within the IPRO project will be organized to attack a selected subset of the questions above or others that are found to be important. Prof. Sullivan is expert in particle simulations. We have identified two computer simulation codes, MARS and MNCP, used by radiation safety personnel at Fermilab in their determinations of muon safety thresholds. Prof. Kaplan is expert in muon-beam cooling and muon and radiation detection technologies. We hope to engage the IIT Ethics Center in addressing some of the ethical and societal questions. Other resources will include publicly accessible information regarding shipping lanes, container manufacture, etc. for national ports. Students will work together in teams and provide periodic oral and written progress reports to the group as a whole.

This IPRO project is proposed for the Fall 2015 semester, with the possibility of continuing in Spring 2016 and beyond. It can benefit from collaborating students from any field of study, e.g., physics, engineering, computer science, applied math, humanities, or anyone interested in applying their talents toward advancing a solution to this problem.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-210: Creating a Metra-CTA Intermodal Link at Ogilvie Transportation Center (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Ogilvie Transportation is the destination for Metra trains arriving from the west, north and northwest suburbs of Chicago. The CTA Green Line is a major rail line which connects the Loop with the south and west sides. Although the train platforms are only 30 yards apart, there is no inter-modal link between them. Instead a passenger must walk 1-2 blocks away from the station they want to board trains at, walk down a long flight of stairs, retrace their steps 1-2 blocks back to the station they want to leave from, and walk up another long flight of steps. This is an unnecessary disincentive to public transportation riders.

The objective of this IPRO project is to develop conceptual designs of a pedestrian structure that will allow passengers of each line to walk between the stations by the shortest and most convenient route.

The IPRO team will establish site datum points by using existing maps, and by observation and measurement on the site. The team will then design, pre-engineer and provide cost estimates for the proposed structure. Finally, the team will prepare written and graphic materials to present to appropriate public transportation bodies. The IPRO team would work to secure an opportunity to present its concepts to appropriate planning and budgeting committees of the CTA, RTA and Metra so that they can consider the project and, if deemed viable, ultimately include it in their capital budget plans.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-211: Housing Resiliency Study & Prototype (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu) and Robert Pontarelli (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Most homeowners and apartment dwellers are completely dependent on energy and water grids which are subject to interruption and occasional failure. These systems are threatened by weather-related events, human error and climate change. Most residents have no backup plans for what to do if these systems fail, and failure in even one system often makes occupancy of their homes impossible.

The objective of this IPRO Project is to develop a set of tools and strategies that can be used by residents to make their homes more resilient in the face of uncertain future events. These tools and strategies can be as simple as painting roofs white to prevent heat buildup in summer, or as complicated as solar panel powered backup battery systems. Tools and solutions may be generally applicable across a range of climates and conditions or may be specific to certain locales.

The approach that this IPRO team will use is to identify potential infrastructure interruption and failure scenarios, and then to design strategies and develop tools to make the homes more resistant to the catastrophic effects of these failures. Various strategies will be demonstrated by creating scale models and prototypes and showing how the suggested improvements will make the houses liveable and comfortable during these events.

The IPRO team will develop approaches to create awareness about its tools and strategies, which may be captured in a presentation and report. The team will identify organizations that represent stakeholders in the home disaster and recovery arena, including insurance companies, utilities, municipalities, etc., and seek opportunities to share its plans during the semester to capture input, as well as share its findings and strategies at the end of the project.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-212: Synthesizing and Testing Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Nanomaterials and Investigating Industry Applications and Commercialization Potential (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Faculty:

Leon Shaw (MMAE) (lshaw2@iit.edu) and Bob Anderson (ChBE) (anderson@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics

Description:

Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt (WC-Co) materials make up of 98 percent of all hard metal components and have been widely used in military, aerospace, automotive, marine, petrochemical, mining, electronics, and wood industries. In all of these military and civilian applications, superior wear resistance derived from a combination of high hardness and high toughness is required. In some cases, impact resistance is also a must. Thus, advanced WC-Co materials with simultaneous improvements in hardness and toughness will greatly enhance the performance of many existing WC/Co components, and open up new opportunities in areas outside its current application windows.

This IPRO project will seek (i) to develop novel synthesis and processing methods to make nanostructured WC-Co materials with simultaneous improvements in hardness and toughness and (ii) to conduct cost analysis and evaluate commercialization options for the new methods developed. At the end of the IPRO project, students will be able to make nanostructured WC-Co materials and know how to develop a business plan for scale-up studies and subsequently full-scale production for nanostructured WC-Co materials.

During the semester, the team will be synthesizing and processing nanostructured WC-Co cutting tool materials. The nanostrutured WC-Co materials will be characterized to define their microstructures and mechanical properties, and compared with a wide range of commercially available WC-Co materials. If there are interesting results, there may be opportunity to participate in publication of findings via IIT's undergraduate research journal or other publications.

The team will also organize to study the commercialization and business aspects of the project. This includes performing cost analysis of manufacturing novel nanostructured WC-Co versus commercial WC-Co. The team will also evaluate the viability of commercialization options that include licensing the nanostructured WC/Co technology to existing companies or creating a start-up company with funds from venture capital firms or angel investors.

The team will also have the opportunity to design promotional materials that may include technical specifications, performance data and application profiles to inform potential companies and investors about this technology transfer and commercialization opportunity. Students who join this fall 2015 IPRO team are encouraged to consider also joining the follow-on team for spring 2016 in order to benefit most from this project and assure continuity.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-213: Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Electrical Contractors' Association of City of Chicago

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-213 IPRO SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-338.]

There is significant energy loss and wasted expense in many existing buildings, especially older ones. Such structures can benefit from a contemporary, methodical review and analysis to identify opportunities for reducing waste and improving energy efficiency.

Working with the IIT office of Energy and Sustainability (OCES), Mayor's Office Retrofit Chicago, and Electrical Contractors' Association of City of Chicago, our IPRO sponsor, we will identify a building that offers an interesting and challenging case and that can benefit from an energy analysis. The outcome will be recommendations for improving energy efficiency in cost-effective and timely ways.

This project will be undertaken within the framework of the national NECA Energy Challenge. Examples of methods that the team will apply include: green and lighting analysis, smart technologies, smart meters and monitoring, communication systems and computer monitoring, energy storage, geothermal and HVAC control systems.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-214: Developing Insights into IIT Electrical & Utility Vault Design, Water Leakage and Corrosion to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Cost (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Contractors Power & Light and IIT Campus Utilities & Energy

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-214 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-339.]

Across the United States and specifically on the IIT campus there are many old, energy inefficient, poorly designed, corrosive, and environmentally-unfriendly utility vaults that consume energy and require incur maintenance costs. They are in dire need of improved design, maintenance, and upgrading. Liquid infiltration into the vaults can create serious problems, such as pipe and insulation deterioration, cable faults and corrosion, electrical component corrosion and failure, etc. Vaults include: (1) steam or district heating vaults; (2) chilled water or cooling distribution vaults; (3) electrical cable vaults; (4) electrical switchgear vaults; and (5) telecommunication vaults.

Working with the IIT Office of Campus Energy & Sustainability (OCES) and Consumers Power & Light, the objective of this continuing IPRO project is to conduct an energy/utility investigation and analysis of IIT selected utility vaults to (1) identify cause and effect factors and (2) propose creative, environmentally conscious and economically viable solutions to the utility design and maintenance inefficiencies where there currently are no obvious solutions. This requires a rigorous, in-depth approach to identify root causes of the problems being encountered, and viable engineering and economic solutions based on thorough analyses that can define initial, operating and maintenance costs that determine the expected return on investment.

IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-215: The Future of Smart Grid: Increasing the Reliability of Sustainable Power (A Technological Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Sargent & Lundy LLC

Faculty:

Nancy Hamill-Governale (ARCH) (hamill@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-215 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-303. AS OF 3/27/15, CONTINUATION OF THIS TOPIC IS CONTINGENT UPON APPROVAL BY SARGENT & LUNDY AND MAY BE UPDATED.]

Utility Grids in the United States were originally developed at a time when transmission and generating technologies were different than today. The incorporation of renewable portfolio standards in the United States has led to increased generation from sources such as solar cells and wind turbines. These have resulted in fluctuations in power generation and grid instability due to the intermittent nature of these power sources. As the use of renewable sources increases, the electric grid must evolve to handle the specific issues associated with the technologies. How can the grid be updated to improve stability while incorporating renewable energy sources? Taking present technology into consideration for generation, transmission, distribution and end use applications, what impact would the use of modern technology have on grid architecture? How would reliability be achieved? How could sustainability be improved if the existing system were redesigned?

The transition from non-automated to automated Smart Grid utility systems is gaining momentum within the United States. Grid stability is a key limiting factor in renewable power generation. Smart Grid technology has the potential to mitigate the impact of increased reliance upon renewable power generation. How can the existing Smart Grid data be analyzed to provide solutions for the existing stability, distribution, and transmission problems? What data can be used to help predict future demand with more intermittent generation sources? Independently owned microgrids have been utilized in the United States for decades in university, hospital, residential and other environments. What knowledge can we gain from exploring existing microgrids and trends within the United States to redesign our utility grid?

The IPRO team will be guided through the development of a conceptual redesigned Smart Grid including links to new renewable sources required by renewable portfolio standards. The objective is to create a system that maximizes efficiency while at the same time increases reliability and stability to each energy consumer and reduces emissions through the use of renewable energy. The IPRO team will have the opportunity to meet and interact with existing Smart Grid designers, operators and building managers to explore how electric power systems work.

The combination of various academic specializations within the IPRO team will provide a wide range of viewpoints in terms of utility design. We will utilize initial brainstorming techniques to determine the direction for the semester and specific milestones needed to design a Smart Grid by IPRO Day. Research, determination of existing technology, and examination of current utility grid design will offer insight into designing this new utility system. The team will explore the types of "big data" that may be generated through the operation of the utility grid and the data analytics that help derive meaning from the information that can have value in individual and organization decision making.

The IPRO team will conduct thorough research and create well-developed analyses that support responses to the following questions by the end of the semester:
  1. How can we characterize the types of data generated through the operation of modern Smart Grid systems?
  2. How can Smart Grid concepts be applied to mitigate issues related to instability with increased renewable power?
  3. How can the Smart Grid be used to optimize distribution and transmission?
  4. How can the process of incorporating renewable power into the grid be improved?
  5. What is the best way to incorporate new renewable energy production in remote locations relative to existing microgrids while maintaining stability?
  6. If time permits, how can Smart Grid concepts be applied to developing areas with little or no wired or wireless connectivity? What are the limitations and benefits of designing modern systems within undeveloped regions?


IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-218: Use of Treated Wastewater in Buildings: Research on the Relationship Between Cities and Water

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 8:35 to 9:50 am.

Sponsor:

in collaboration with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of the City of Chicago

Faculty:

Edoarda Corradi Dell Acqua (CAEE) (ecorradi@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

This IPRO project aims to explore today’s relationship between cities, waterfronts and water, analyzing the challenges and opportunities presented by living near bodies of water.Historically, there has been a strong relationship between water and the built environment. Let’s think of the ancient Roman aqueducts, thermal baths, or the gardens and fountains of Arabic tradition. During the nineteenth century the edge between city and water was primarily used for industry and transport, import and export of goods, which led to environmental degradation and pollution of water and waterfronts.

In the post-industrial era the dialogue between cities and water has been re-defined due to economic, social, and environmental changes. Today’s service-oriented economy and the progressive de-industrialization of urban port areas as well as the concurrent technological development of road, rail, air, and water transport combined with the requirements of freight containerization led to the migration of ports to extra-urban sites and produced a “spatial and functional vacuum” on urban waterfronts. As a consequence, since the 1960s the development and revitalization of waterfronts has become a topic of great interest in urban planning.

In addition to the economic drivers, which brought a change in the spatial and functional use and configuration of urban waterfronts, today we are facing important humanitarian and environmental challenges. The United Nations identifies “two main challenges related to water that are affecting the sustainability of human urban settlements”: a growing need for water and sanitation due to the growing urban population (today 50 percent of humanity lives in cities) and “increasing water-related disasters such as floods and droughts” due to climate change. Thus, a smart and sustainable water management in cities becomes extremely important for human health, safety, the environment, economic growth and development.

Only a small fraction, approximately 3 percent, of the world’s water is fresh water and the Great Lakes hold nearly 20 percent of the world’s fresh surface water. Chicago uses over one half billion gallons of water daily for residential, industrial and commercial purposes. This water comes from Lake Michigan; it is used once and then sent to water treatment plants and finally discarded and sent away from the city to the Gulf of Mexico. Instead of the industrial model of disposing of water from the city as quickly as possible, the goal of this project is to identify and analyze new ways to recycle and reuse treated wastewater within the city's eco-system by thinking about such water as an asset whose use can be further extended rather than simply immediately returned to bodies of water.

During fall 2014, a research team led by Professor Paul Anderson, Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering and with an architecture studio of Professor Martin Felsen, College of Architecture and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) started exploring the idea of using treated wastewater in the development of an eco-industrial park located on Chicago’s South Side.

This IPRO project aims to advance the research started through the above collaboration. The challenge is broad and can benefit from involvement of students from a range of disciplines that include architecture, business, engineering, the sciences, etc. that could contribute to the achievement of the project goals.

It is anticipated that the IPRO project will be organized in three phases:
  1. Weeks 1-4: Research through international urban case studies, including the development of waterfronts such as the London Docklands project, etc.
  2. Weeks 4-7: Investigation of wastewater recycling technology such as that in Singapore
  3. Weeks 7-15: Development of innovative concepts and solutions for economically "repurposing" locally-treated wastewater to support the conceptual design of an Eco-Industrial Park on Chicago's South Side.


IPRO 497-2xx sections with a "Technological Innovation" concentration have the general aim of creating a functional prototype or active experiment. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the technological aspect.return to top

497-301: Reimagining the STEM Education Experience (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing STEM education through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Susan Camasta (SAT) (camasus@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-301 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-07.]

Where will the next generation of discoveries in science and innovations in technology come from? Will the US continue its leadership in pursing world problems and engineering solutions? If Americans are to lead in the future we will need to educate our students today—using best practices and even groundbreaking methods—especially in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). How are we educating today’s young people and what educational innovations might lead to a greater number of students engaging with STEM and pursuing careers in these fields? An informed and critically thinking citizenry is at stake as well as a healthy US economy in a globally competitive marketplace.

From The White House to IBM and the National Science Foundation to Motorola Solutions Foundation, individuals and groups are calling for innovations in STEM education to ultimately make our world a better place. What are the problems within our existing system of STEM education, what changes are currently in the works, and what types of innovations could move us still forward? In this IPRO we will explore STEM education innovation. What are your ideas? What changes will you propose?

The IPRO team assembled to tackle these questions will undertake its semester work through the following phases:

1. How might we describe our own experiences as students in K-16 STEM education? We may choose to listen to the stories of others from various generations, cultures and circumstances. (Weeks 1-3)

2. What are the current Best Practices in STEM education? We will review trends in education standards and how they are met in creative ways in various school systems, both in the US and abroad, How are non-profit organizations developing and deploying innovative concepts to excite young people about STEM fields? (Weeks 3-6)

3. Who are the innovators in STEM-related industry?What related sectors, such as the Maker Lab movement, are connecting with young people and inspiring interest in STEM fields? Can their structures and novel methods provide ideas for STEM education? (Weeks 6-8)

4. How can we reimagine STEM education? This can involve discussions with: Motorola Solutions Foundation and similar organizations in the Chicago area, and our own fall IPRO 497-302 and IPRO 497-310 STEM Education teams working on concepts for Chicago institutions. These conversations and our other investigations provide the context for framing our own problem areas and scouting for insights that can lead to innovative concepts in various aspects of the STEM experience. Possible problem areas in which we could concentrate efforts include: enabling technology; informally integrating STEM education in non-STEM activities and subject matter; redesigning physical classroom space; conceiving interdisciplinary hands-on projects; and motivating/mentoring underrepresented groups in STEM. (Weeks 8-11)

5. How do we promote our ideas: how can we be heard? We will need creative ways to summarize and present concepts to opinion leaders. This may include publishing to share our ideas. Additionally, we might lay the foundation for future STEM IPRO teams. (Weeks 11-15 and as continuing IPRO)

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-302: Managing Projects for Non-Profit Organizations with STEM Missions (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing STEM education through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Sari Gluckin (ID) (sari@wishthink.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-302 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-03.]

STEM Education is at the forefront of thinking by the public, academic institutions, workplace organizations and government bodies. With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards and a push to inspire K-12 student interest in STEM careers, organizations view this as an opportunity to incorporate STEM outreach into their missions. With the help of Motorola Solutions Foundation's Innovation Generation Partners, students joining this IPRO cluster have the opportunity to work closely with these organizations to learn how to manage an effective client relationship while creating innovative solutions to meet each organization's unique mission.

As members of discrete IPRO teams within this cluster, students will learn and apply a variety of tools for information gathering, data evaluation, ideation, implementation and testing. Students will develop an appreciation for the multiple moving parts in a client-based project through engagement with an organization that has a STEM-based mission. This course is relevant for those 1) who are interested in STEM outreach, 2) interested in learning how to manage client relationships, and 3) whose careers will involve direct interaction with clients and community partners.

Each semester brings a new set of projects. Previous projects and activities in this cluster have included:
  1. Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana (developing teaching modules for Journey World; developing STEM-in-a-Box Activities for Young Scouts);
  2. Shedd Aquarium (developing teaching modules on ecological separation; designing teaching modules on aquatic microbiomes);
  3. Erikson Institute (developing K-3 teaching modules on human-made world);
  4. Adler Planetarium (creating and prototyping concepts for a meteor strike exhibit; ideating STEM activities for millennial visitors);
  5. Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (enhancing and teaching field data collection for high school students); and
  6. Southland Metropolitan Higher Education Consortium (developing workshops to incorporate maker labs into the K-12 curriculum).


IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-303: Made in USA: Developing Concepts to Revitalize Making in America through Insights from Global Manufacturing Trends (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (Institute of Design) (mail@limiashunia.com) and Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com) in consultation with Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-303 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-06.]

Manufacturing is foundational to building a society’s wealth and quality of life. To know manufacturing in the United States is to know its story of unbounded ingenuity and leadership. The US-dominated manufacturing landscape of the 20th century began to decline in the 1970’s, when American companies started setting up manufacturing facilities “off-shore” in countries like China. This took advantage of inexpensive shipping and lower wages in developing countries. It appeared for a while that almost all manufacturing in the United States would eventually end up in these countries.

Today, a growing number of American companies are reversing course and bringing manufacturing back to the United States in a trend known as "reshoring." Companies that once sent their manufacturing facilities off-shore are discovering that there are hidden costs in moving production a long way from home. Rising foreign wages, stagnating American wages, long transit times, increased cost of shipping, and low domestic energy prices, have all combined to make producing overseas less attractive. At the same time, industries are changing due to mega-factors such as digital processes and high demand for shortened cycle times. They must continue to change if they are to withstand impending turning points (e.g. peak oil).

The Manufacturing Enterprise is in a state of continuous transformation where corporations are expanding, contracting, exporting jobs, importing jobs all in an effort to stay competitive and best match their operations to their markets. Numerous factors influence manufacturing. It is surmised that by investigating the factors that influence the location and operation of manufacturing, one can discover clues to the state of manufacturing 50 years in the future. The current semester (Spring 2015) is assembling a compilation of trends from which they will offer predictions by industry for manufacturing 50 years into the future and will suggest a catalog of projects to support these predictions. The proposed Fall 2015 semester will develop projects with intention to validate the predictions.

Students will familiarize themselves with the manufacturing analysis and manufacturing predictions developed by prior IPRO teams. They will then work to develop one or more projects related to each prediction. During the semester, students will visit manufacturing companies to heighten their awareness of manufacturing and, where it makes sense, partner or consider them in their project work.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-304: The Bronzeville Community Challenge (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing creative community initiatives through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

TBA

Sponsor:

Faculty:

TBA

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO Bronzeville Challenge gives IPRO teams in this themed cluster the opportunity to compete in a refereed way. At the end of the semester, the student team that has developed the most innovative concept for the Bronzeville Community will be recognized.

Neighborhoods need to continually rethink their approach to economic development and community development, taking into account many factors that influence the interaction between and among government, businesses and residents. In the Bronzeville Challenge, students will be presented with the following challenge: through discussion and collaboration with local community stakeholders and partners throughout the Bronzeville community, identify a current issue in the community that needs addressing, and develop and test a concept that meets an important community need in a compelling way.

There will be three juried critiques during the semester:
  1. First mid-process presentation: focuses on identifying an unmet need in the Bronzeville Community (problem framing with data).
  2. Second mid-process presentation: focuses on the proposal for addressing the solution (creative concept development).
  3. Final presentation: summarizes and fine-tunes the information from the first two presentations while also including an element of concept testing.


The teams will be guided along their Bronzeville Challenge journey through the following process steps: conducting research (secondary and primary); characterizing user/stakeholder needs; developing specifications; creating a taxonomy; brainstorming concepts; documenting work.

This Bronzeville IPRO Challenge experience will ideally result in healthy competition among IPRO teams as well as recognizing one team for its innovative concept.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-305: Community Engagement Innovation (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com), William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu) and Jim McKay (ARCH) (jmckay4@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



If you want to make a difference - You will want to join the Community Engagement Cluster!

The Community Engagement Cluster (CEC) undertakes human-centered design on a wide range of problems – from our campus to the other side of the globe. Teams begin by conducting research that identifies various problems to tackle, sharing their own ideas, and ultimately deciding what they wish to work on. Students in CEC may be working as locally as developing an undergraduate research lab or as globally as using open source construction methods to develop clean water resources for developing countries.

Students of the Community Engagement Cluster (CEC) benefit from unfettered access to stakeholders, have true authority to direct their team, and experience real opportunity to see their ideas implemented. Teams will engage in brain-storming, project specific research, and collaboration with diverse thinkers – all to improve the lives of others -- ranging from our campus to Chicago neighborhoods, the region and the globe.

The fall 2015 IPRO teams within the cluster are expected to be organized to address the following topics: Roseland/Redline Extension Project, Lawndale/Harmony Energy Management, Patriot Pavilion, and Neighborhood Cultural Poverty. The Roseland/Redline Extension Project, as an example, is profiled in the following paragraphs:

One of the projects expected to continue for summer and fall 2015 is the Roseland/Redline Extension Project. This project serves to identify and address the needs of the Roseland neighborhood that extends from 95th Street at the North to 130th at the South, and Halsted at the West and Cottage Grove at the East. During this research, the redevelopment of the 95th Street Redline Train Station has started. However, this is only a small part of the plans for the Greater Roseland Community. The Redline is to extend its service to include train stations at 103rd, Roseland Medical District (111th), 115th, and 130th Streets at I94. Working with the Developing Community Project's (DCP) 95th Street Panel of Development (POD), projects are being developed to improve the Roseland community along the Redline.

Also, critical relationships have been established, with various neighborhood organizations and developers that allow unfettered contact with stakeholders (community leaders, residents, and business owners). Teams meet with stakeholders, identify and respond to their needs and present their findings and concepts.

Once a striving community, parts of Roseland served as a shopping area for the south sides of Chicago and was well known for its community friendly atmosphere. However, parts of the Roseland area are cut-off from the rest of Chicago because of its lack of transportation. The area has become a crime-ridden area with several abandoned homes and businesses. Parts are considered to be a food desert because of the lack of high end grocery stories. Some of the businesses located in Roseland have reached out to the IPRO Program to help in the gentrification of the area. It is the hope of the community that the new CTA stops will allows the bulk of the area to become a transit-oriented community which provides unique development opportunities that other neighborhoods do not have.

Previous projects undertaken through the Princeton Park Collaborative have included the adaptive reuse of a previous church into a community center and the design of a 70-unit assisted senior living facility to be built by the St. James Methodist Church. The community center board and St. James is currently using the information provided by the IPRO teams in their search for funding. The work of the teams included the development of needed programs; code and zoning analysis; construction and operating budgets; as well as schematics with architectural and systems design. Through the work of IPRO teams, the Roseland/Redline Extension Project is destined to leave a long-lasting impact on this community interested in maintaining its identity and providing for its residents.

For summer and fall 2015, the IPRO team will develop plans for the gentrification of the Roseland community by working with the DCP POD mentioned above. The IPRO team and the stakeholders will expand research of the Roseland/Redline Extension Project to include more Community Churches, Businesses, Secondary Schools and Colleges in the development of Roseland.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (2), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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497-306: Urban Agriculture Innovation at IIT (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Rodger Cooley (ARCH) (rcooley@iit.edu) and Erika Allen (Growing Power)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

[THIS IPRO 497-306 SECTION WAS FORMERLY IPRO 497-02.]

The health and well being of individuals, communities and environments in the United States are challenged and compromised by the dominant industrial food system. Obesity, diabetes and other diet related diseases, waste of organic nutrients, massive water pollution, and excessive green houses gasses are linked to how food is produced, harvested, distributed, processed, marketed, prepared and consumed. The vast majority of fresh produce travels over 1200 miles to get to Chicago. Produce is harvested early before it is at peak ripeness, processed at multiple steps and retailed 7-10 days after picking. This leads to a loss of nutritional value and taste all along the chain before it consumed. Because of the standardization of fruit and vegetable production, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization calculated 75% of crop diversity has been lost since 1900. A loss of diversity and genetics never researched for qualities such as disease and pest resistance, drought tolerance, and nutritional benefits. There are many other urban and market trends and motivating factors that have stimulated the urban agriculture movement.

Since its inception in the Spring of 2012 as IPRO 314, UFarmIIT has been adding elements and partners to address the problems of the dominant food system using the opportunities provided by urban agriculture. UFarmIIT is now a student farm, community garden, student organization, test site for technology innovation, and resource for the Bronzeville community. UFarmIIT is providing IIT for urban agriculture and is providing hands on learning opportunities for students.

Similar projects at other universities have started at this basic level and grew over time to become robust programs providing diverse educational opportunities and career pathways for students; incorporating many departments through research, curriculum, and projects; generating revenue through sales, grants and donations; providing access to healthy produce for local communities; and positive attention and differentiation for the universities.

Access to safe healthy fresh food remains an issue in Bronzeville and the immediate areas surrounding IIT. The IIT campus and Bronzeville have underutilized land and wasted green spaces. Student interest continues to grow in urban agriculture and in many of the related issues such as addressing storm water, growing trees for the campus and community, supplying native habitat, improving nutrition and creating living laboratories, are all opportunities for an urban agriculture program to explore.

Since 2012, the IPRO has partnered with: (a) IIT Facilities to reuse wood chips from fallen trees on campus, provide water to the site, develop a site for bees, and secure a space for future aquaponics systems; (b) ARCH First Year studio to design, build and install innovative “living” fence panels; (c) UFarmIIT student group to provides space for alumni, students, staff and faculty for personal garden plots; and (d) St. James Church’s Food Pantry to provide multiple deliveries of surplus produce; the Biology Department Labs for space to grow mushrooms.

Other partnerships and activities in development include building out and launching an aquaponics system on campus; furthering work on an remote sensor system to wirelessly monitor conditions on the farm; working with IFSH to help develop safe handling guidelines for fresh produce and value added products; launching a tree nursery with Facilities; providing space for learning projects for the Boeing Scholars program; and assisting local elementary, middle and high schools with their own gardening programs.

The spring 2015 IPRO team is focused on:
  1. Continuing work on remote sensor system to track and monitor then provide real-time notifications of the growing conditions on the farm while irrigating the farm. Team will also design, construct and install an embedded sensor system at UFarmIIT and the Aquaponics lab.
  2. Working with Schulze & Burch Biscuit Company (35th & South Racine) to develop a plan for adjacent green space including plantings, rainwater collection, irrigation, composting, energy, and structures.
  3. Researching, planning, designing and starting a year round crop production plan with projected harvests and potential income.
  4. Designing, building and testing a new aquaponics system at the Facilities Building (31st and South Federal Street).
  5. Refining an urban agriculture plan for IIT owned empty lot (29th & South State Street)


The fall 2015 IPRO team will concentrate on the following:
  1. Technology Team: Continue work on remote sensor system to track and monitor then provide real-time notifications of the growing conditions on the farm while irrigating the farm. Team will also develop a remote monitoring system for an aquaponics system on or off campus. The system will be integrated with a solar panel array and battery system.
  2. Community Team: Further community work with local Bronzeville gardens and school gardens by extending IIT’s resources out to community partners and thereby to build their capacity and improve production. This includes Bronzeville Urban Agricultural Alliance, and others organizations.
  3. Business Team: Develop processes and procedures for new student run campus enterprise model.
  4. 30th Street Farm Extension: Expand development of IIT farm infrastructure at the 30th Street site. This includes expanding work at the Tree Nursery, developing prototypes for water catchment, composting, furniture, garden beds and vertical growing.


IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-307: NEW! Developing Urban Agriculture Facilities at Imani Village (A Social Innovation IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

TBD --- May be scheduled for Thursday evenings from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Imani Village (Trinity 95th and Cottage Grove Planned Community Development LLC

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

The project sponsor, Trinity 95th and Cottage Grove Planned Community Development, LLC, facilitated by Zeb McLaurin of McLaurin Development Partners, is the owner/developer of a 30 acre, mixed-use development on the far south side of Chicago to be known as Imani Village. Included in the project is a 5 acre site for urban agriculture, and a 35,000 sq. ft. industrial building for use as a Public Market/Food Hub and food wellness education center, to be known as Urban Oasis. Together, the Urban Farm and the Food Hub (Urban Oasis at Imani Village) are intended to be a “social enterprise” and model of and prototype for an “Urban Food System” that serves the Roseland and Pullman Communities, well documented as a Food Desert.

The Urban Food System mentioned above will be supported in concept and program by the Federally Qualified Health Center and the Athletic/Wellness Center also planned for the development. The Urban Farm and Public Market/Food Hub, (Urban Oasis at Imani Village) will serve as a healthy food destination for visitors from across the city and South Suburbs. The specific/appropriate uses and configurations of the Urban Farm and Public Market/Food Hub sites have not yet been finalized, which creates the opportunity for an IPRO team to collaborate with the sponsors and stakeholders to develop conceptual designs for the development.

The IPRO project has several aims that will begin in summer 2015 and likely continue in fall 2015: (1) create a plan for how the Urban Farm and Food Hub segments of the Imani Village Development will be used to create the Urban Food System; (2) develop conceptual designs and recommendations for configuring the spaces; (3) estimate costs of various components; and (4) identify and characterize potential users for the facilities and strategies for engaging them effectively.

As the IPRO team begins its research, it will benefit from input by the Imani Village principals through Patricia Eggleston, Esq, and Dr. Angela Odom-Young, and McLaurin Development Partners. The IPRO team will review various documents available from the sponsor that provide context and guidance: (1) the Imani Village development concept, (2) the Demographic and Statistical Background and Statement of need for Imani village Urban Farm and Public Market/Food Hub, and (3) the master plan for the site developed by the McLaurin team. The research phase will also include a site visit and conversations with individuals and organizations in the communities in proximity to the Imani Village site.

Based on its research findings, the IPRO team will begin to develop guiding principles and specifications for its subsequent conceptual design work for the facilities that will be part of the development, namely, the Urban Farm and the Public Market/Food Hub. At the same time, the framework and input to a business plan will also evolve as part of this process. For example, the IPRO team will propose specific uses for parts of the site that include areas for row crops, hoop houses, farmer's markets, specialty grocery store, farm yield distribution center, community kitchen and or restaurant.

Given the preliminary concepts it develops, the team will work with the sponsor to share early ideas with potential users to determine the level of interest in the proposed uses. Given some evidence of interest and input, the IPRO team will develop more detailed conceptual plans and cost projections. These will be presented to the owner/developer Imani Village and McLaurin for their consideration, and may shape the agenda for future IPRO team projects.

Given the scope of the opportunities for an IPRO Team to contribute creative value to the sponsors and stakeholders, it is possible that this project will continue in the spring 2016 semester.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.return to top

497-310: The STEM Education Innovation Challenge (A Social Innovation multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing STEM education through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Marilee Bowles-Carey (ID) (marilee1@comcast.net)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The STEM Education Challenge allows student teams to compete in a refereed way, recognizing the student team that has developed the best idea in STEM Education over the course of the semester.

In this Challenge, students will work with Chicago-area organizations providing STEM outreach and/or education. This may include local schools as well as grantees of Motorola Solutions Foundation such as Adler Planetarium, Shedd Aquarium, Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana, Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, and others. Conversations with these types of stakeholders will provide context for framing the IPRO STEM Challenge problem and developing insights that can lead to innovative concepts for the STEM Education experience. Possible problem areas include: enabling technology; informally integrating STEM education in non-STEM activities and subject matter; redesigning physical classroom space; conceiving interdisciplinary hands-on projects; and motivating/mentoring underrepresented groups in STEM.

There will be three juried critiques in the class:
  1. First mid-process presentation: focuses on identifying STEM Education opportunities that align with the STEM partners mentioned above. (problem framing with data).
  2. Second mid-process presentation: focuses on the proposal for addressing the solution (creative concept development).
  3. Final presentation: summarizes and fine-tunes the information from the first two presentations while also including an element of concept testing.
To help guide the team’s semester long work, important components of the IPRO Challenge course include: conducting research (secondary and primary); characterizing user/stakeholder needs (consumers, carriers, manufacturers, government agencies, offenders); developing specifications; creating a taxonomy; brainstorming and prototyping concepts; and documenting work

This IPRO Challenge experience will ideally result in healthy competition among IPRO teams within this section as well as recognizing one team for their innovative idea.

IPRO 497-3xx sections with a "Social Innovation" concentration have the general aim of defining or helping achieve the mission of the stakeholders. While there will be balanced consideration of business, social and technological factors, these IPRO sections will tend to have a greater emphasis on the social aspect.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 50 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster, depending on the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For fall 2015, there may be as many as 11 themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: STEM Education (3), New Venture Design, Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), Made in USA, Automotive Systems Innovation, Community Engagement (2), and Urban Agriculture. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are (a) created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins, or (b) in some themed clusters, created by individual student teams.
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