IPRO Current Listings for Spring 2015

IPRO 000
IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SPRING 2015
IPRO 397-100
Interprofessional by Design: Digital Service Design -- Exploring App Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-200
Interprofessional by Design: Product Design -- Exploring Product Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-300
Interprofessional by Design: Global Challenges -- Exploring MEDLIFE & Developing Country Needs via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-400
Interprofessional by Design: Venture Design -- Exploring New Venture Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-500
Interprofessional by Design: Urban Systems -- Exploring New Infrastructure Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 397-600
Interprofessional by Design: AIRchetecture -- Sky is the Limit for Aerospace and Architecture Convergence (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)
IPRO 497-01
Community Engagement Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-02
Urban Agriculture Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-03
Managing Projects for Non-Profit Organizations with STEM Missions (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing science, technology, engineering and mathematics education through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-04
Student New Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing new venture concepts through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-05
Student New Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing new venture concepts through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-06
Made in USA: Developing Concepts to Revitalize Making in America through Insights from Global Manufacturing Trends (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by reframing global manufacturing issues through user-centered design methods and collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-07
Reimagining the STEM Education Experience (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing science, technology, engineering and mathematics education through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-302
NEW! User Interfaces for Novel Computer-Aided Drug Design Tools
IPRO 497-303
UPDATED! The Future of Smart Grid: Increasing the Reliability of Sustainable Power
IPRO 497-305
Developing an Antimatter Gravity Interferometer
IPRO 497-307
Intermodal Container Facility Innovations for the Chicago Area
IPRO 497-308
Stimulants for Enhancement Purposes: Exploring Societal & Ethical Issues (A Research-Intensive IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-309
Reimagining the Turnstile: Improving User Experience, Mitigating Infrastructure Injustice and Assuring Safety and Security for All
IPRO 497-313
UPDATED! Vehicle Systems Innovation (Including the Refuelable Electric Vehicle)
IPRO 497-316
Creating (and Selling) a Viable Tissue Implant for Human Joints (A Research-Intensive IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-317
Making an Artificial Pancreas (A Research-Intensive IPRO Project)
IPRO 497-338
Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments
IPRO 497-339
Developing Insights into IIT Electrical & Utility Vault Design, Water Leakage and Corrosion to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Cost
IPRO 497-347
Domus in Horto (House in a Garden)
IPRO 497-348
Large-Scale Solar Desalination in the Sahara
IPRO 497-350
Mobilus: Robotic Standing Wheelchair with Arm Component
IPRO 497-354
Creating Process Improvements
IPRO 497-356
Techno-Business User-Application Trends Analysis of US Motor & Transformer Electricity Consumption
IPRO 497-359
The Simularium: Exploring Opportunities for an Immersive Environment with 3D Visualization at IIT
IPRO 497-363
IIT Pride: Improving Student & University Community Engagement
IPRO 497-364
Developing a Campus News Videography Experience

000: IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SPRING 2015

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Meeting Days/Time:

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Appropriate Disciplines:

Description:

IPRO sections are officially listed by the registrar under the subject "Interprofessional Project" in the MyIIT portal for registration. We are adding descriptions of the Spring 2015 IPRO Offerings at this website as soon as possible the week of October 27.

We are offering the following IPRO options for spring 2015:

(1) Six IPRO 397-xxx sections as one of the options for students taking their first IPRO course. Students taking their first IPRO course can also freely choose from among the other IPRO 497 section options as well.

(2) Six themed cluster sections are being offered for spring 2015. Themed Cluster IPRO 497-xx sections are organized for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

(3) Traditional IPRO 497-3xx sections with 10 to 12 students each. There are on the order of 15 traditional IPRO sections for spring 2015.

IPRO sections are set up with capacity limits and limits on the number of students from the majors that are expected to be most attracted to a specific IPRO project. As a result, it may appear that there are seats available in the registration system; however, some of those seats may be reserved for specific majors in order to best manage the multidsciplinary composition of the team.

A couple of selected IPRO sections that are more research-intensive are set up with admittance to the team by permit only. In this case, we are striving to be thoughtful in collaboration with interested students, so that we are able to form a team of students with a keen interest in contributing to a more research-intensive IPRO topic. Students from all majors with an interest in the IPRO sections that have registration by permit are urged to contact the instructor and Tom Jacobius to share background and interest.

If you are unable to register because the section is at capacity or there is any other seat availability restriction by major, you are urged to consider other IPRO sections that interest you. You may also add yourself to the wait list for a closed IPRO section. Students who are waitlisted will be reviewed by the IPRO Program staff and instructor if there is an opportunity to add students to a given IPRO section.

Questions about choosing an IPRO project and IPRO registration can be directed to Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu).

Students are also encouraged to attend the IPRO Registration Fair that will take place in the MTCC Bridge area on Tuesday, November 4 from 12 noon to 5 pm. Tables will have Spring 2015 IPRO information and IPRO instructors may be on hand to describe their projects and discuss student interest in them.return to top

397-100: Interprofessional by Design: Digital Service Design -- Exploring App Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Martin Schray (ID/ITM), Hanna Korel (ID) and other instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with the theme of digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with the theme of product design), IPRO 397-300 (Global Challenges), IPRO 397-400 (Venture Design), IPRO 397-500 (Urban Systems) and IPRO 397-600 (AIRchetecture (a.k.a. Sky's the Limit)). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-100 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-100 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON DIGITAL SERVICE DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing digital services. Students will work in small, interdisciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple digital service.

A service is an intangible product we experience in time through multiple touch-points and channels. According to the US department of commerce services account for 80 percent of the US GDP. However, most services are not that special or distinctive. How was the service the last time you flew? This class will focus on improving service experiences through digital technology. An example of a digital service (since we are talking about flying) is the seat selector application that allows you to pick your seats when you book a flight online. Previous to this digital service you would need to accept whatever seat was assigned to you or call and wait for an agent to help you change your seat. This digital service allows you to change your seat at the time of booking.

Digital services are delivered through a combination of apps, websites, texts, and social media. Shazam, Amazon.com, Citibank mobile banking, and Hulu are examples of digital services. We expect that your team will conceive, design conceptually, and test a simple digital service (more like an app on your phone than Amazon.com). The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

We believe that good services will:
  1. Solve for a real user need and address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Use existing, accessible data;
  3. Are intuitive for the user, i.e., you do not need to read a long manual to understand how to use it;
  4. Solve a discreet problem (confirming I have an appointment with my doctor) not a high level problem (helps me with all aspects of my health); and
  5. Do not require a major advance in coding or computer science in order to be viable.
Digital service design naturally leverages the skills of students majoring in such fields as computer science, information technology and management, professional and technical communication, psychology and business, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and web and app development are encouraged to sign up.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-200: Interprofessional by Design: Product Design -- Exploring Product Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Jim Braband (SSB) and other instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-200 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-200 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON PRODUCT DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing and developing products. Students will work in small, inter-disciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple product. The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

Projects in this class will be student driven: it will be up to you and your team to identify a need and then develop a product that addresses that need. The final deliverable will be a prototype of your concept that demonstrates the benefits of your solution. You will also be responsible for developing a preliminary business plan for the concept. We will provide the guidance and tools for identifying and developing your product, but we have found that these projects are more successful when they are based on student interest.

We believe that good products will:
  1. Solve for a real user need / address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Have ten parts or less (this is about the level of complexity that your team will be able to prototype);
  3. Can fit through a door (this is a good way to keep the scale of the product small); and
  4. Can be prototyped with the resources and funds available to you (each team will have a $500 budget for your prototype, so you likely cannot use exotic materials).
Product design naturally leverages the skills of engineers (e.g., aerospace, biomedical, electrical, mechanical) and architects, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students who are interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and product development (obviously) are encouraged to sign up.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director, or Tom Jacobius, IPRO Operations Director (jacobius@iit.edu or 312.567.3986.return to top

397-300: Interprofessional by Design: Global Challenges -- Exploring MEDLIFE & Developing Country Needs via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Hanna Korel (ID) (hanna.korel@gmail.com) and Omar Khalil (ChBE) (okhalil@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-300 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-300 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON GLOBAL CHALLENGES. This IPRO section is focused to identifying opportunities for new products, services or business models that address global challenges. These challenges may be those articulated by various international or philanthropic organizations, or identified by students or faculty based on their insights or personal experiences. A particular area of focus is to address the needs of developing countries and the world’s poor, but there may be other broad global issues that affect other regions and populations. Programs and organizations that offer perspectives on global challenges include the UN Millenium Project, MEDLIFE, International Development Enterprises (IDE) (http://www.ideorg.org), Engineers Without Borders (EWB), Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW), etc. Global challenge topics may also surface through other venues at IIT, including the Armour College of Engineering themes (health, energy, water, security), Institute of Design workshops, other IPRO team projects, other IIT colleges, etc.

The Global Challenges IPRO section will establish a robust agenda of opportunity areas for student exploration and application of user-centered design methods. One broad area of investigation relates to developing extremely affordable products that can serve the rural poor of the world. The significant challenge facing our global society is to address the needs of the two billion poor in the world who live on less than $3.00 per day and 1 billion of these live on less than $1.00 per day. These two billion suffer from many deficiencies including contaminated water or lack of sufficient water, inadequate shelter and lack of access to affordable and sustainable energy for cooking, heating and other lifesaving and enriching uses like lighting and communications.

It is important that an agenda be developed that broadly offers a good fit between what is needed by the rural poor in developing countries or other global challenge areas, and what our students and faculty can focus on based on our expertise and capabilities and that can create value. In general, the multiple multidisciplinary IPRO teams that are organized through this Global Challenges IPRO section will develop a deep understanding of a particular user need and opportunity through user-centered design methods. This will lead to identifying creative, simple and appropriate solutions that are extremely affordable and can be considered for local manufacture and supply.

The experience of the teams each semester in tackling a specific need and opportunity will help to build an archive of information and experience that can inform future teams about how to identify, select and develop a continuous stream of extremely affordable product concepts over multiple years. This IPRO team therefore will create a legacy of service for the rural poor of the world and the global community at-large through a sustaining IPRO project that future generations of IIT students can participate in.

Members of the team from various disciplines will also learn to use design methods, testing processes and economic and technical review processes to ensure that our solutions have the right cost structure and performance reliability and provide an appropriate solution. Members of the team will also develop their ability to learn and apply good project management practices to mobilize both team and external collaborator resources. Ethical issues arise often in working with and researching the needs and behaviors associated with people in developing countries, and dealing with these ethical issues is a part of participating in this IPRO. There will be significant opportunities to identify and build relationships with external collaborators.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director, or Tom Jacobius, IPRO Operations Director (jacobius@iit.edu or 321.567.3986).return to top

397-400: Interprofessional by Design: Venture Design -- Exploring New Venture Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Doug Wills (ID) (wills.douglas@gmail.com) and other IPRO instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-400 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-400 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON VENTURE DESIGN. IIT students currently have a variety of individual entry points across the university for exploring their ideas, obtaining support and even forming a team to further develop their concepts. The purpose of this IPRO section is to inspire and encourage new venture concepts in a dynamic, multi-team workshop environment that cultivates interaction, serendipitous connections, breakthrough thinking, and a touch of competitive spirit.

This IPRO section will be organized in small, agile multidisciplinary teams. The teams will be guided through the application of user-centered design methods, with an overarching balance of attention to user desirability, technical feasibility and business viability. Teams that are formed will be guided through the innovation process that begins with problem/opportunity definition and research, emphasizes ethnographic research, identifies driving insights, inspires brainstorming and promotes iterative prototyping with user feedback.

The IPRO teams organized in this section will become relentless and tenacious in properly framing possibilities, methodical and self-disciplined in developing valid and reliable data and insights, and creative and opportunistic in recognizing and capitalizing on driving insights. The aim is to inspire collaborative innovation that creates value and a path forward for teams to advance their concepts.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director, or Tom Jacobius, IPRO Operations Director (jacobius@iit.edu or 321.567.3986).return to top

397-500: Interprofessional by Design: Urban Systems -- Exploring New Infrastructure Concepts via User-Centered Design Methods (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (Institute of Design) mail@limiashunia.com) and Roberto Cammino (MMAE) (cammino@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-500 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-500 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON URBAN SYSTEMS DESIGN. The Urban Systems section organizes teams that identify and explore new infrastructure concepts. Cities function because of (or in spite of) urban systems, which can be loosely defined as any collection of independent parts that work together to make cities work better (or not). Examples of such systems include those that provide energy, communications, education, healthcare, water supply, solid waste management, recreation, and transportation. Above and beyond conventional repair, urban systems need redesign to move forward toward the intelligent, integrated systems that will make future cities work.

Students in this multi-team IPRO section will examine the challenges posed by urban systems, propose creative solutions to those challenges, and then form innovation teams focused on the research and development of prototype solutions. In addition to increasing awareness and understanding of urban problems and using innovative multidisciplinary approaches to address these problems, students in this IPRO section will learn and develop skills related to team dynamics, project management, economic analysis, and life-cycle assessment --- all in the context of applying discipline-specific fundamental knowledge and problem solving methods.

It is anticipated that this IPRO section will spawn multiple themed clusters focused to Armour College of Engineering themes, namely, water, health, energy, security which have relevance to a variety of IIT disciplines.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director, or Tom Jacobius, IPRO Operations Director (jacobius@iit.edu or 321.567.3986).return to top

397-600: Interprofessional by Design: AIRchetecture -- Sky is the Limit for Aerospace and Architecture Convergence (An IPRO course option for first-time IPRO students.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Alice Kriegel (ID) (akriegel@protostudio.net) in consultation with John Manaves (ARCH)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



IPRO 397-600 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-600 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON AIRchetecture (formerly IPRO 346 Sky's the Limit: Retracing the Technological Evolution of Aviation and Its Impact on Architecture.) With over a quarter of a million people flying in the air between ground and space at any given moment, this IPRO continuing project will challenge this mode of temporary existence, researching and developing aerial architecture.

The IPRO team will retrace the technological evolution of aviation and the impact on the designed world rethinking current technologies within architecture and design. In 1891 Alexander Graham Bell began to experiment with the idea of creating heavier than air structures. In this new world the Wright Brother’s winged aviation model of flight is trumped by Alexander Graham Bell’s visions. The emphasis of an elevated ground is explored. A new aerial fiction is produced by hybridizing techniques found in modern aviation with the past. Within this context emerging technologies will be developed and explored. In an attempt to challenge the city, a temporary inhabitable flying platform will be designed and prototyped. The plan is to design a platform that can fly above the tallest towers in the world rethinking the basic principle of the city skyline, the skyscraper.

The project will progress through three phases:

Phase 01 Precedents & Types -- Encompasses research, analysis and documentation of iconic works of architecture that are categorized as aerial projects to better understand historical precedents and how they relate to course interests. A comprehensive categorization and documentation will be created.

Phase 02 Up-Skilling (Overlapping Phase 01) -- Emerging technologies within the field of architecture will be explored and learned. The hacking and reuse of these technologies will assist in the development of phase 03. Software and hardware will be explored, including advanced fabrication techniques.

Phase 03 Aerial Vision & Prototyping -- Prototypes of new proposed structures will be developed using various IIT resources. A team will be developed to explore and test both physical and digital models. return to top

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are six section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday section from 1:50 to 4:30 pm), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), IPRO 397-300 (Friday section from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm), IPRO 397-400 (Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm), IPRO 397-500 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm) and IPRO 397-600 (Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm. Questions may be addressed to the IPRO instructor identified above, Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director, or Tom Jacobius, IPRO Operations Director (jacobius@iit.edu or 321.567.3986).return to top

497-01: Community Engagement Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Joseph Clair (ARCH) (joseph@josephclair.com), Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com), William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu) and Jim McKay (ARCH) (jmckay4@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



If you want to make a difference - You will want to be in the Community Engagement Cluster!

The Community Engagement Cluster (CEC) undertakes human-centered design on a wide range of problems – from our campus to the other side of the globe. Teams begin by considering various problems to attack, introducing their own, and ultimately deciding what they want to work on. Students in CEC may be working as locally as developing an undergraduate research lab or as globally as utilizing open source construction methods to develop clean water resources for developing countries.

Previous teams have worked on the following projects: 95th / Dan Ryan Neighborhood Redevelopment Collaborative, Social Innovation for Developing Community Workshop, and Community Energy on an Urban Neighborhood Scale. These teams addressed the concerns of a redeveloping Chicago neighborhood, developed products for fresh water distribution in India, and refined the recycling process for metropolitan areas.

Students of the Community Engagement Cluster (CEC) will benefit from unfettered access to stakeholders, have true authority to direct their team, and experience real opportunity to see their ideas implemented. Teams will engage in brain-storming, project specific research, and collaboration with diverse thinkers – all to improve the lives of others -- ranging from our campus to Chicago neighborhoods, the region and the globe.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 30 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2015, there are seven themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: Community Engagement, Urban Agriculture, STEM Education (2), Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), and Made in USA. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins.
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497-02: Urban Agriculture Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Rodger Cooley (ARCH) (rcooley@iit.edu) with Erika Allen (Growing Power) and in consultation with Blake Davis (INTM)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

The health and well being of individuals, communities and environments in the United States are challenged and compromised by the dominant industrial food system. Obesity, diabetes and other diet related diseases, waste of organic nutrients, massive water pollution, and excessive green houses gasses are linked to how food is produced, harvested, distributed, processed, marketed, prepared and consumed. The vast majority of fresh produce travels over 1200 miles to get to Chicago. Produce is harvested early before it is at peak ripeness, processed at multiple steps and retailed 7-10 days after picking. This leads to a loss of nutritional value and taste all along the chain before it consumed. Because of the standardization of fruit and vegetable production, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization calculated 75% of crop diversity has been lost since 1900. A loss of diversity and genetics never researched for qualities such as disease and pest resistance, drought tolerance, and nutritional benefits. There are many other urban and market trends and motivating factors that have stimulated the urban agriculture movement.

Since its inception in the Spring of 2012 as IPRO 314, UFarmIIT has been adding elements and partners to address the problems of the dominant food system using the opportunities provided by urban agriculture. UFarmIIT is now a student farm, community garden, student organization, test site for technology innovation, and resource for the Bronzeville community. UFarmIIT is providing IIT for urban agriculture and is providing hands on learning opportunities for students.

Similar projects at other universities have started at this basic level and grew over time to become robust programs providing diverse educational opportunities and career pathways for students; incorporating many departments through research, curriculum, and projects; generating revenue through sales, grants and donations; providing access to healthy produce for local communities; and positive attention and differentiation for the universities.

Access to safe healthy fresh food remains an issue in Bronzeville and the immediate areas surrounding IIT. The IIT campus and Bronzeville have underutilized land and wasted green spaces. Student interest continues to grow in urban agriculture and in many of the related issues such as addressing storm water, growing trees for the campus and community, supplying native habitat, improving nutrition and creating living laboratories, are all opportunities for an urban agriculture program to explore.

Since 2012, the IPRO has partnered with: (a) IIT Facilities to reuse wood chips from fallen trees on campus, provide water to the site, develop a site for bees, and secure a space for future aquaponics systems; (b) ARCH First Year studio to design, build and install innovative “living” fence panels; (c) UFarmIIT student group to provides space for alumni, students, staff and faculty for personal garden plots; and (d) St. James Church’s Food Pantry to provide multiple deliveries of surplus produce; the Biology Department Labs for space to grow mushrooms.

Other partnerships and activities in development include building out and launching an aquaponics system on campus; furthering work on an remote sensor system to wirelessly monitor conditions on the farm; working with IFSH to help develop safe handling guidelines for fresh produce and value added products; launching a tree nursery with Facilities; providing space for learning projects for the Boeing Scholars program; and assisting local elementary, middle and high schools with their own gardening programs.

The Fall 2014 semester is working with the Entrepreneurship Academy to develop a new IIT student run campus business model to provide structure and services to developing student run on campus enterprises; partnering with Sodexo to begin growing food for sale on campus; completing the installation of a campus tree nursery; installation of sensors at UFarmIIT; improving Good Agriculture Practices at UFarmIIT; coordination of training for Bronzeville community and school gardens; and pulling together a vision for an urban agriculture program.

The Spring 2015 Urban Agriculture Cluster IPRO will focus on these projects:

(1) Continue developing the plan for an Urban Agriculture Program and and Community Food Systems at IIT to provide opportunities for students, staff and faculty to use expanding urban agriculture on IIT's campus and the larger neighborhood.

(2) Continue work on remote sensor system to track and monitor then provide real-time notifications of the growing conditions on the farm while irrigating the farm. Team will also develop a remote monitoring system for an aquaponics system on or off campus.

(3) Work with Schulze & Burch Biscuit Company to develop a plan for adjacent green space including plantings, rainwater collection, irrigation, composting, energy and structures.

(4) Further community work with local Bronzeville gardens and school gardens by extending IIT’s resources out to community partners and thereby to build their capacity and improve production.

(5) Follow through on developing student run campus business proposal and support for expanded farm at 30th and State Street site.

The Spring 2015 IPRO will be tasked with solidifying the ideas, research and feedback from previous semesters into a coherent plan and proposal for instituting a dynamic urban agriculture program on IIT's campus that is actively engaged with the Bronzeville community. Students will field test their draft proposals by getting feedback from stakeholders through out the semester.

The Spring 2015 IPRO will organize in teams that focus on different aspects of the urban agriculture program plan:

1. IIT Urban Agriculture Vision: Team will pull together previous research and outreach to describe, illustrate and explain the program involving physical elements (UFarmIIT, 30th St/State St, Bee hives, Aquaponics, Composting), curriculum development (Minor, Certificate, Internships), and the Bronzeville community (IIT Community Relations, local organizations, schools and gardens). Team will need to make an easily understood and attractive set of communication materials. Team with gather feed back from stakeholders in the urban agriculture plan.

2. Technology: Team will continue work on aquaponics, embedded onsite sensors. Using learning from the system built and research from the Fall ‘14 semester, students will move to building and installing monitoring equipment for new aquaponic system. Students will partner with the remote sensor team as well.

3. Schulze & Burch Biscuit Company: Team will work with stakeholders to determine a master plan for landscape and garden space adjacent to their facilities at 35th and Racine in Bridgeport. The team will develop a range of creative, sustainable concepts, including those that repurpose materials associated with Schulze & Burch Biscuit Company operations, e.g., shipping containers, totes, pallets, etc.

4. Community Team: Group will work with the Bronzeville Urban Ag Alliance, local schools, community gardens, IIT partners and UFarmIIT to coordinate training, volunteers, shared information and learning.

5. Student Run Campus Business: Team will continuing solidifying process and procedures for developing and managing a student run campus business. Group will also further progress proposal being made in the Fall ’14 semester to fund the development of farming business on the IIT campus.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 30 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2015, there are seven themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics:n Community Engagement, Urban Agriculture, STEM Education (2), Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), and Made in USA. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins.
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497-03: Managing Projects for Non-Profit Organizations with STEM Missions (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing science, technology, engineering and mathematics education through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Daniel Gandara (PSYC) (d.a.gandara@gmail.com) and Sari Gluckin (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:



STEM Education is at the forefront of thinking by the public, academic institutions, workplace organizations and government bodies. With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards and a push to inspire K-12 student interest in STEM careers, organizations view this as an opportunity to incorporate STEM outreach into their missions. With the help of Motorola Solutions Foundation's Innovation Generation Partners, students joining this IPRO cluster have the opportunity to work closely with these organizations to learn how to manage an effective client relationship while creating innovative solutions to meet each organization's unique mission.

As members of discrete IPRO teams within this cluster, students will learn and apply a variety of tools for information gathering, data evaluation, ideation, implementation and testing. Students will develop an appreciation for the multiple moving parts in a client-based project through engagement with an organization that has a STEM-based mission. This course is relevant for those 1) who are interested in STEM outreach, 2) interested in learning how to manage client relationships, and 3) whose careers will involve direct interaction with clients and community partners.

Each semester brings a new set of projects. Previous projects and activities in this cluster have included:
  1. Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana (developing teaching modules for Journey World; developing STEM-in-a-Box Activities for Young Scouts);
  2. Shedd Aquarium (developing teaching modules on ecological separation; designing teaching modules on aquatic microbiomes);
  3. Erikson Institute (developing K-3 teaching modules on human-made world);
  4. Adler Planetarium (creating and prototyping concepts for a meteor strike exhibit; ideating STEM activities for millennial visitors);
  5. Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (enhancing and teaching field data collection for high school students); and
  6. Southland Metropolitan Higher Education Consortium (developing workshops to incorporate maker labs into the K-12 curriculum).


The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 30 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2015, there are seven themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: Community Engagement, Urban Agriculture, STEM Education (2), Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), and Made in USA. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins.
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497-04: Student New Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing new venture concepts through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Nik Rokop (SSB) (nrokop@stuart.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The purpose of this IPRO section is to accommodate and support IIT students who want to create a business during the semester but do not have a framework or support in another credit-bearing format. We also aim to accommodate students who already have a business and want to move it forward while in school and need dedicated and structured time to work on it, as the IPRO course offers. This IPRO section also accommodates previous IPRO teams that desire to take the next step toward making a real world impact through their project and do not yet have a clear path forward.

The objective of this IPRO course is to create a framework whereby students working in small and agile venture teams will (1) learn a repeatable process to successfully start a company; (2) acquire skills in sales, hiring, and operations that can be applied in a startup or in working for a company; (3) learn to successfully motivate resources such as team members, funding, advisors, and mentors; and (4) make measurable progress in taking an idea to a real business, or move an existing business to the next level.

Most of the time will be spent working on the business under the guidance of the IPRO instructors and guests who are relevant industry experts and technology mentors. Working in teams, students will be introduced to the basic processes of starting a business, including legal structures, funding mechanisms, and customer development through reading materials, attending events in the community, and meeting with their mentors. Team members will focus their learning on the appropriate stage of their business but also receive generally applicable knowledge, references and connections. Students will learn to manage intellectual property in both public and private settings.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 30 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2015, there are seven themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: Community Engagement, Urban Agriculture, STEM Education (2), Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), and Made in USA. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins.
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497-05: Student New Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing new venture concepts through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Nik Rokop (SSB) (nrokop@stuart.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The purpose of this IPRO section is to accommodate and support IIT students who want to create a business during the semester but do not have a framework or support in another credit-bearing format. We also aim to accommodate students who already have a business and want to move it forward while in school and need dedicated and structured time to work on it, as the IPRO course offers. This IPRO section also accommodates previous IPRO teams that desire to take the next step toward making a real world impact through their project and do not yet have a clear path forward.

The objective of this IPRO course is to create a framework whereby students working in small and agile venture teams will (1) learn a repeatable process to successfully start a company; (2) acquire skills in sales, hiring, and operations that can be applied in a startup or in working for a company; (3) learn to successfully motivate resources such as team members, funding, advisors, and mentors; and (4) make measurable progress in taking an idea to a real business, or move an existing business to the next level.

Most of the time will be spent working on the business under the guidance of the IPRO instructors and guests who are relevant industry experts and technology mentors. Working in teams, students will be introduced to the basic processes of starting a business, including legal structures, funding mechanisms, and customer development through reading materials, attending events in the community, and meeting with their mentors. Team members will focus their learning on the appropriate stage of their business but also receive generally applicable knowledge, references and connections. Students will learn to manage intellectual property in both public and private settings.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 30 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2015, there are seven themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: Community Engagement, Urban Agriculture, STEM Education (2), Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), and Made in USA. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins.
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497-06: Made in USA: Developing Concepts to Revitalize Making in America through Insights from Global Manufacturing Trends (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by reframing global manufacturing issues through user-centered design methods and collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (Institute of Design) mail@limiashunia.com) and Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com) in consultation with Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Starting in the 1970’s, American companies started setting up manufacturing facilities “off-shore” in countries like China. This took advantage of inexpensive shipping and lower wages in developing countries. It appeared for a while that almost all manufacturing in the United States would eventually end up in these countries.

Today, a growing number of American companies are reversing course and bringing manufacturing back to the United States in a trend known as "reshoring." Companies that once set up or contracted for manufacturing facilities off-shore are discovering that there are hidden costs in moving production a long way from home and from their major market location. One crucial change that has taken place over the past decade or so is that wages in low-cost countries have soared. Pay and benefits for the average Chinese factory worker rose by 10 percent a year between 2000 and 2005 and increased to 19 percent a year between 2005 and 2010. This rise in foreign worker wages occurred as American worker hourly rates fell and, along with the long shipping delivery times, has made producing overseas less attractive. At the same time, the cost of shipping has increased significantly as global energy prices have gone up, while domestic energy prices have remained low. And then there is the growing corporate concern about the carbon footprint of shipping goods over great distances that consumes natural resources and affects environmental quality. These trends have significantly leveled the playing field associated with where goods are made.

Manufacturing has the largest multiplying effect in the US economy by comparison to all other sectors, creating eight additional jobs per one manufacturing job. And the jobs created by manufacturing are good, highly paid, skilled jobs. It is no surprise then that manufacturing off-shore has caused negative impacts to our economy. Companies are beginning to reconsider their manufacturing locations and how that influences the bottom line, product quality and corporate social responsibility. The closer proximity of US locations offers the benefits of (a) optimized processes between designers and producers, (b) speedier product launches, (c) improved cycle times and lead times and (d) better customer service. In the longer term, re-shoring will be boosted by the use of advanced manufacturing techniques and cheap energy production technology in North America that promise to alter the economics of production.

The next era of manufacturing will create highly skilled workers who, employing advanced technologies, will be more productive. Stronger manufacturing stabilizes the economy, creates new wealth and spurs innovation. Making America more productive also creates more in-direct jobs to support these innovative manufacturers. This IPRO will look at these new manufacturing trends and determine how they will affect five industries in the Chicago area over the next 20 years.

This Made in USA Cluster offers students the opportunity to investigate contemporary manufacturing trends that impact our future. Teams of four to six students will create a customized plan for a manufacturing company in the Chicago area that is considering re-shoring some of their manufacturing facilities. The plan will be developed in conjunction with the company.

The spring 2015 IPRO teams in this cluster will benefit from the manufacturing research foundation established by the fall 2014 IPRO teams in this cluster. This included constructing an “Era” Analysis of Manufacturing over the past 100 years. They also investigated how manufacturing facilities were sited and how this system of locating manufacturing facilities has been changing over the years. They also analyzed why these decisions were made and the underlying economic rationale behind them.

The fall 2014 teams in this cluster also applied their research findings to explore how these large manufacturing location trends have manifested themselves in specific industry groups. The IPRO teams in this cluster met with Chicago-area manufacturers and organized uniquely-designed projects to identify factors that would promote re-shoring. Teams developed insights about the potential for re-shoring, the barriers and motivations for re-shoring, and the timeline for large-scale re-shoring within its industry study group, and what types of incentives can spur future progress toward having more products made in USA.

It is anticipated that the work of the initial Fall 2014 Made in USA cluster of teams lays the foundation for future investigations in collaboration with companies and other organizations with interest and potential for their products to be made in USA. This provides the starting point for the spring 2015 IPRO teams in this cluster to apply their creativity to new industries and organizations.

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 20 to 30 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2015, there are seven themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics: Community Engagement, Urban Agriculture, STEM Education (2), Student Venture Development & Entrepreneurship (2), and Made in USA. The individual team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be updated by the time the semester begins.
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497-07: Reimagining the STEM Education Experience (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing science, technology, engineering and mathematics education through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Susan Camasta (SAT) (camasus@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Where will the next generation of discoveries in science and innovations in technology come from? Will the US continue its leadership in pursing world problems and engineering solutions? If Americans are to lead in the future we will need to educate our students today—using best practices and even groundbreaking methods—especially in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). How are we educating today’s young people and what educational innovations might lead to a greater number of students engaging with STEM and pursuing careers in these fields? An informed and critically thinking citizenry is at stake as well as a healthy US economy in a globally competitive marketplace.

From The White House to IBM and the National Science Foundation to Motorola Solutions Foundation, individuals and groups are calling for innovations in STEM education to ultimately make our world a better place. What are the problems within our existing system of STEM education, what changes are currently in the works, and what types of innovations could move us still forward? In this IPRO we will explore STEM education innovation. What are your ideas? What changes will you propose?

The IPRO team assembled to tackle these questions will undertake its semester work through the following phases:

1. How might we describe our own experiences as students in K-16 STEM education? We may choose to listen to the stories of others from various generations, cultures and circumstances. (Weeks 1-3)

2. What are the current Best Practices in STEM education? We will review trends in education standards and how they are met in creative ways in various school systems, both in the US and abroad, How are non-profit organizations developing and deploying innovative concepts to excite young people about STEM fields? (Weeks 3-6)

3. Who are the innovators in STEM-related industry?What related sectors, such as the Maker Lab movement, are connecting with young people and inspiring interest in STEM fields? Can their structures and novel methods provide ideas for STEM education? (Weeks 6-8)

4. How can we reimagine STEM education? This can involve discussions with: Motorola Solutions Foundation and similar organizations in the Chicago area, and our own IPRO 497-03 STEM Education teams working on concepts for Chicago institutions. These conversations and our other investigations provide the context for framing our own problem areas and scouting for insights that can lead to innovative concepts in various aspects of the STEM experience. Possible problem areas in which we could concentrate efforts include: enabling technology; informally integrating STEM education in non-STEM activities and subject matter; redesigning physical classroom space; conceiving interdisciplinary hands-on projects; and motivating/mentoring underrepresented groups in STEM. (Weeks 8-11)

5. How do we promote our ideas: how can we be heard? We will need creative ways to summarize and present concepts to opinion leaders. This may include publishing to share our ideas. Additionally, we might lay the foundation for future STEM IPRO teams. (Weeks 11-15 and as continuing IPRO)return to top

497-302: NEW! User Interfaces for Novel Computer-Aided Drug Design Tools

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

David Minh (CHEM) (dminh@iit.edu) and Co-Instructor with User Interface Design Expertise TBA

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Information Design, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

A key aspect of pharmaceutical research and development is drug design - engineering a molecule with just the right properties to treat a disease without harming the body. Researchers in IIT's chemistry department are developing a new computer program to improve predictions about whether or not a molecule will bind to its intended target. Presently, the program does not have a user-friendly interface. Graphical user interfaces could enable more molecular engineers to access our cutting-edge algorithms, ultimately accelerating drug discovery.

The objective of the IPRO project is to design, implement, and test one or more graphical user interfaces for our program, AlGDock (https://github.com/ccbatiit/algdock/). The interfaces may be designed for different platforms including the world wide web, a stand-alone computer program, or an app for a tablet or smart phone.

As a first step, the team will choose a platform and build a minimal interface capable of submitting jobs to a computing cluster using existing files. The team will also develop ways to visualize results. The team will then add additional features, including the ability to draw molecules from scratch or edit existing molecules.

The prototype interfaces will be tested by non-programmers in academic and/or industrial chemistry laboratories involved in drug design. Future semesters may include development of new features and implementation across different platforms. As with AlGDock, the programs will be made available through an open-source MIT license. This license will facilitate use, enable future teams to build upon the programs, and allow contributors to establish a public portfolio of design/programming/project management.

Given the broad project purpose outlined above, the IPRO team will take the initiative in developing realistic goals based on their background and experience, achieve them in a timely manner by the end of the semester, and lay the foundation for continuing work through future IPRO teams. We anticipate that the IPRO team will learn and use brainstorming and iterative prototyping techniques, write and document software code, and test the user interface programs with intended users. The team will have the opportunity to communicate with algorithm developers (our research group) as well as potential users in pharmaceutical research laboratories. Based on the above, an interdisciplinary IPRO team is highly desirable, including disciplines that span user interface storyboarding and design, software development, user testing, and molecular science. return to top

497-303: UPDATED! The Future of Smart Grid: Increasing the Reliability of Sustainable Power

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Sargent & Lundy LLC

Faculty:

Nancy Hamill-Governale (ARCH) (hamill@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, , Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

Utility Grids in the United States were originally developed at a time when transmission and generating technologies were different than today. The incorporation of renewable portfolio standards in the United States has led to increased generation from sources such as solar cells and wind turbines. These have resulted in fluctuations in power generation and grid instability due to the intermittent nature of these power sources. As the use of renewable sources increases, the electric grid must evolve to handle the specific issues associated with the technologies. How can the grid be updated to improve stability while incorporating renewable energy sources? Taking present technology into consideration for generation, transmission, distribution and end use applications, what impact would the use of modern technology have on grid architecture? How would reliability be achieved? How could sustainability be improved if the existing system were redesigned?

The transition from non-automated to automated Smart Grid utility systems is gaining momentum within the United States. Grid stability is a key limiting factor in renewable power generation. Smart Grid technology has the potential to mitigate the impact of increased reliance upon renewable power generation. How can the existing Smart Grid data be analyzed to provide solutions for the existing stability, distribution, and transmission problems? What data can be used to help predict future demand with more intermittent generation sources? Independently owned microgrids have been utilized in the United States for decades in university, hospital, residential and other environments. What knowledge can we gain from exploring existing microgrids and trends within the United States to redesign our utility grid?

The IPRO team will be guided through the development of a conceptual redesigned Smart Grid including links to new renewable sources required by renewable portfolio standards. The objective is to create a system that maximizes efficiency while at the same time increases reliability and stability to each energy consumer and reduces emissions through the use of renewable energy. The IPRO team will have the opportunity to meet and interact with existing Smart Grid designers, operators and building managers to explore how electric power systems work.

The combination of various academic specializations within the IPRO team will provide a wide range of viewpoints in terms of utility design. We will utilize initial brainstorming techniques to determine the direction for the semester and specific milestones needed to design a Smart Grid by IPRO Day. Research, determination of existing technology, and examination of current utility grid design will offer insight into designing this new utility system. The team will explore the types of "big data" that may be generated through the operation of the utility grid and the data analytics that help derive meaning from the information that can have value in individual and organization decision making.

The IPRO team will conduct thorough research and create well-developed analyses that support responses to the following questions by the end of the semester:
  1. How can we characterize the types of data generated through the operation of modern Smart Grid systems?
  2. How can Smart Grid concepts be applied to mitigate issues related to instability with increased renewable power?
  3. How can the Smart Grid be used to optimize distribution and transmission?
  4. How can the process of incorporating renewable power into the grid be improved?
  5. What is the best way to incorporate new renewable energy production in remote locations relative to existing microgrids while maintaining stability?
  6. If time permits, how can Smart Grid concepts be applied to developing areas with little or no wired or wireless connectivity? What are the limitations and benefits of designing modern systems within undeveloped regions?
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497-305: Developing an Antimatter Gravity Interferometer

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Daniel Kaplan (PHYS) (kaplan@iit.edu) and Derrick Mancini (PHYS)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

Does antimatter fall up? The science-fictional idea of antigravity is now being taken seriously by a number of researchers around the world. We will develop novel experimental apparatus to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter.

Einstein's General Relativity, the accepted theory of gravity, predicts no difference whatsoever between the gravitational behaviors of matter and antimatter. While well established experimentally, General Relativity has never been tested with antimatter. If antimatter is found to fall up in the gravitational field of the Earth -- or even if it falls down, but at a different rate from matter -- it will fundamentally change our view not only of gravity but of the nature and evolution of the Universe.

The measurement will require a source of neutral antimatter atoms and a precision device to measure their motion under gravity. Our approach is to use muonium -- a hydrogen-like atom composed of an antimuon bound to an electron. (Although the electron is matter, since the antimuon is 200 times heavier than the electron, muonium should act gravitationally like antimatter.) Muonium sources exist at a number of particle accelerator laboratories around the world. Since muonium decays on average in 2.2 microseconds, the measurement is difficult and requires extreme mechanical precision.

We will develop a precision interferometer employing thin silicon gratings to be made at Argonne National Laboratory using nanotechnology fabrication techniques. We will design and build the gratings, characterize their precision (and, if necessary, figure out how to improve it), and carry out design and simulation studies of the experiment.

This IPRO project ran for the first time during the fall 2014 semester, and significant progress was made. But there's more left to be done! So we propose to continue it in spring 2015. It can utilize collaborating students from many fields of study, for example, physics, engineering, computer science, and applied math. return to top

497-307: Intermodal Container Facility Innovations for the Chicago Area

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 to 11:15 am.

Sponsor:

Mi-Jack Products

Faculty:

Laurence Rohter (CAEE) (rohter@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Intermodal Freight is the transfer of Containers and Trailers from Rail to Truck and from Truck to Rail. Chicago is the most important railroad center in North America with more lines of track radiating in more directions from Chicago than from any other city. Six of the seven major railroads have important operations. Intermodal is one of the largest economic engines in the Chicago Area. There are new situations affecting this Transportation Hub often called the third largest container port in the world:
  1. Reshoring-- more and more domestic containers shuttling goods around the U.S;
  2. Box Car Curtailments--moving goods previously shipped by box car to containers, double stacked, and trailers on flat cars;
  3. Panama Canal Expansion nearly on-line, but late and over-budget;
  4. Chinese Company purchase of franchise for a Nicaragua cross-Isthmus canal;
  5. Better Thermal Controls of Shipments;
  6. Tighter Management Tools; and
  7. Alternative uses of containers, e.g., Emergency Housing.


The IPro team will undertake several tasks in parallel,including:
  1. A thorough review of the situational picture relative to anticipating changes in Intermodal technologies and demand;
  2. Enhance work and models previously developed for enroute thermal prediction and packaging with additional testing and protocol development;
  3. Incorporate several new leading edge tools to provide better intermodal yard planning and operations: (a) Arena simulation software by Rockwell Automation helps to demonstrate, predict, and measure system strategies for effective, efficient and optimized performance; and (b) Unity 3d is a universal tool for architectural visualizations, interactive media installations, and video game development.
  4. Thorough and publishable review of the effects of the 2013 Washington IL and earlier Joplin MO tornados to determine contents and extents of C5 containers. Expectation is to produce a publishable paper.
  5. Develop an implementation strategy in co-operation with the Chicago Southland Economic Development Corporation for designing and manufacturing C5 containers, and co-ordinate an awareness campaign.
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497-308: Stimulants for Enhancement Purposes: Exploring Societal & Ethical Issues (A Research-Intensive IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Elisabeth Hildt (HUM) (ehildt@iit.edu) and Kelly Laas (HUM) (laas@iit.edu) of the IIT Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

This IPRO project is about pharmacological neuroenhancement, which is the attempt of healthy individuals to use drugs in order to increase mental performance, i.e. attention, arousal or memory. It will investigate the medical, psychosocial and ethical aspects of the use of stimulants such as Ritalin or Adderall and other drugs for academic performance enhancement. Based on a survey (questionnaire and interview study) to be planned and undertaken at three universities in the Chicago area, it aims to obtain information on students’ views and experiences concerning pharmacological neuroenhancement. In addition, the group will develop educational materials for the IIT community to help students and faculty become more aware of some of the health, ethical and societal issues.

Students who participate in this IPRO project from a variety of disciplines will have a multi-faceted learning experience:
  1. Developing an understanding of the ethical and societal implications of biomedical technologies and biomedical engineering
  2. Developing an understanding of the health issues and ethical and societal problems in the use of stimulants and other drugs for academic performance enhancement;
  3. Devising an informed consent form and submitting a research proposal to an institutional review board for ethics approval
  4. Designing and conducting a professional questionnaire and interview study (devising a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview guideline, analyzing the results and discussing their implications;
  5. Identifying insights concerning Chicago students’ experiences and views concerning pharmacological neuroenhancement
  6. Investigating existing policies or other guidelines covering pharmacological neuroenhancement and academic performance;
  7. Developing educational materials for the IIT community to help students and faculty become more aware of the medical, psychosocial and ethical issues involved;
  8. Communicating findings and recommendations to the IIT community.


The team will first read some of the relevant literature on the medical, psychosocial and ethical aspects of the use of biomedical technology for enhancement purposes and on the use of stimulants such as Ritalin or Adderall for academic performance enhancement in particular. Team members will give presentations on the various topics. The team will discuss the issues they consider relevant to the survey and organize in groups to devise the questionnaire and the semi-structured interview guideline. The team will reflect on the sample size, target group and whom they want to interview, as well as give attention to issues of privacy. The team will devise an informed consent form and will submit its project proposal to the IIT Institutional Review Board for Human Subjects for review. After administering the questionnaire and conducting the interview study, the team will analyze the results and discuss the implications. The team may draw upon expertise available from the Department of Psychology regarding statistical analysis methods.

In addition, the team will investigate the policies or guidelines of other universities in the European Union, the United States and elsewhere that have been developed to manage issues associated with pharmacological neuroenhancement and academic performance. Based on this, the team will develop educational materials for the IIT community that can be added to the web resources of the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions. Activities and events that support the communication of the results at IIT will also be considered and developed.return to top

497-309: Reimagining the Turnstile: Improving User Experience, Mitigating Infrastructure Injustice and Assuring Safety and Security for All

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Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Noah McClain (Social Sciences) (nmcclain@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The fare-control infrastructure of turnstiles in the Chicago El were designed for idealized users who travel without paraphernalia or children, fit certain bodily expectations, have no disability, and do not ever need to enter or exit the El in a personal or mass emergency. By result, El users face objects which may add to their burdens rather than meet their needs in human-object interactions which take place millions of times per year in Chicago (as well as in the many cities and institutions which have adopted similar infrastructure, from the New York Subway to stadiums and theme parks across the county). This IPRO project will seek entwined engineering, design, technical and policy solutions to address this mismatch between turnstile infrastructure versus the actual needs of the riding population and the purposes to which they put the El.

In the 1990's, the Chicago Transit Authority introduced two new types of turnstile in the El. The first most closely resembles a traditional turnstile with one horizontal barrier. The second – the focus of this project - is a full-body enclosure which allows both ingress and egress, known as the High Entry/Exit Turnstiles (or HEET). For the CTA, the HEETs offered a solution to subway entrances which are not monitored full-time by CTA personnel because they physically restrict most forms of fare-evasion but still provide entry and exit capacity. Yet while HEETs are problem-solving instruments for the CTA, they may perpetuate or introduce certain new problems for riders: Though the HEET was designed to accommodate human users, users were conceptualized with the body measurements of naked, male members of the U.S. military. Though the HEET was designed to accommodate individual commuters using the El in an orthodox fashion, they were not designed to facilitate the myriad purposes and configurations through which the system is used – including families laden with paraphernalia, creating the risk that children and caregivers can be separated from one another due to malfunction. Though the HEETs were designed to be useable by fit adults, they do not anticipate the possible frailty or disability of users. These problems suggest a need for alternative turnstile objects or fare-control systems which retain some fare-control properties, but which can be overridden in true emergency; objects or systems which hew closer to principles of universal design, and revisions which accommodate some of the less-acknowledged, but central use-values riders extract from the El, such as: a proxy for moving vans, school busses, emergency shelter, and airport shuttle.

While team members will organize in groups to identify socially-beneficial modifications to fare-control infrastructure and/or its administrative or architectural contexts, the primary objective of the IPRO project will be the learning process entailed in: collaboratively identifying the scope of an issue which is simultaneously social, material, architectural and administrative; engaging in collaborative research and development on multiple fronts according to environmental, material, practical and legal constraints; advancing potential alternatives solutions through discussion, experimentation, collective critique, prototyping, the pursuit of promising avenues; and recognizing significant findings through group analysis and engagement with external critics. A second important objective is to curate and distill the team's work so that a possible subsequent team of students to learn from the successes and instructive efforts of this first semester turnstile design IPRO team.

The team will initially (a) investigate the scope of the problem by engaging in systematic observational research where populations interact with HEETS, and on the Chicago El in general and (b) investigate the legal, material and technical constraints to which the HEETs are answerable. With a grasp of the problem and of the existing constraints for solutions, team members will draw from their varied orientations and skill sets to investigate feasible modifications to the HEET objects, their environmental contexts, and/or to the existing constraints. Potential avenues of investigation will be dependent on the orientations and ideas the students bring to the course, with some possibilities proposed by the instructor as well as by related pilot work already done by a fellow IIT student in the summer of 2014. However, the instructor will encourage students to deploy their collective capacities to propose ways to confront the problem and test potential solutions through policy research, design, prototyping and (if possible) in situ experimentation.return to top

497-313: UPDATED! Vehicle Systems Innovation (Including the Refuelable Electric Vehicle)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

The cost of energy, concerns about environmental sustainability and our carbon footprint, and advancements in materials, control systems and enabling software/hardware continue to "drive" innovation in vehicle systems. This IPRO 313 project has historically focused on the refuelable electric vehicle. However, over the years of the IPRO Program, IPRO teams have worked on ethanol vehicles (including aircraft), fuel cell vehicles (land and submerged), vehicles as storage elements in a future renewable energy dominated grid, etc.

As a result, fueled by the tremendous student demand in registering for this IPRO section for spring 2015, we are updating this IPRO section to go beyond the refuelable electric vehicle. This IPRO section will take on the character of a multi-team IPRO section under the umbrella of "vehicle system innovation." As such, the IPRO section will be organized in four or more discrete multidisciplinary teams that will each tackle an innovative vehicle system. This will include conducting research of the state-of-the-art, discussions with experts in the field, brainstorming concepts, and advancing toward prototyping and testing vehicle modules that offer innovative approaches to contemporary and futuristic vehicle system options.

The possibilities are outline below, with more detail concerning the refuelable electric vehicle at the moment because it represents the most recent vehicle system to be explored by IPRO teams over the past two years. It is important to note that students from a variety of fields are needed to make important contributions as members of these project teams. There are a range of business, political, social and human-centered issues that need to be investigated in parallel with any technology development. It is important that all vehicle system innovations be conceived and developed from the viewpoint of technical feasibility, user desirability and business viability -- the balanced breakthrough approach to user-centered design thinking.

TEAM A. Continuation of the refuelable electric vehicle project. Electric cars are very clean and efficient, but suffer from lack of range and long recharging time. People would use electric cars a lot more if it were possible to recharge a car in less than ten minutes, and do so repeatedly without fear of wrecking the battery. Our approach is to install a "refuelable" battery in a vehicle, and eventually demonstrate the concept in a record-breaking long distance road trip. Recent IPRO 313 teams have been scouting for alternative approaches. For Spring 2015, the main objectives are expected to be: (1) Testing the 4th generation battery prototype built the past fall semester; (2) Investigating alternative technologies, such as IIT's own nano-size lithium fuel; and (3) Beginning a public relations campaign to teach people about the benefits of refuelable electric vehicles.

TEAM B. Expand on one of the ideas conceived by the Fall 2014 IPRO 313 team, consisting of an "electric fuel" made of small rechargeable batteries, which are returned to the service station for recharging at each refueling operation. The challenge is to keep the mini-batteries connected and "flowing" through the car.

TEAM C. Research, design and prototyping of a levitating hoverkart, possibly for use at the MTCC building, and road-going hovercars based on magnetic levitation. Our car will use physics similar to those of the Hendo hoverboard, but without moving parts.

TEAM D. Design of a pneumatic hybrid car, where energy is stored as compressed air rather than in a battery. This concept is based on research by Prof. Ruiz's graduate students.

TEAM X. Additional vehicle system concepts that may be identified by faculty and the spring 2015 IPRO team.return to top

497-316: Creating (and Selling) a Viable Tissue Implant for Human Joints (A Research-Intensive IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 5:00 to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Forelight, Inc. (University Technology Park) and Matrix Odyssey LLC

Faculty:

Joseph Orgel (BIO) (orgel@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:



Note that this IPRO section enrollment is by permit only. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor, Professor Joseph Orgel (orgel@iit.edu) to directly express interest in joining this research project team, sharing how they feel they can contribute to the success of the project and what they hope to gain from the experience. This IPRO project can be particularly attractive to students who wish to gain rigorous experience in an authentic applied research environment, working closely with IIT research faculty and other professionals in a biotech type start-up environment.

Creating (and selling) a viable tissue implant for human jointsHuman joints are vulnerable to incidental or sports injury. The wear and tear effects of normal aging and the severe disease arthritis effects tens of millions a year as a severe disease and effects all humans to some significant degree during their lifetime. Current strategies for treatment of severe joint damage, require whole or partial joint replacement and rely on animal or human postmortem joint transplants that introduce immunological and disease contamination concerns. Other strategies that make use of non-natural, plastic, polymer, short-peptide based fibrils, carbon-nanotube or even silks lack the molecular functionalization and / or 3-D organization that the hosts cells need to properly populate and integrate the implant.

We propose to make use of a technology developed by IIT scientists (Patent applied for) that avoids these fundamental problems. It is based on in vitro re-engineered vertebrate tissues that are decellularized, making an immunologically neutral matrix that also more accurately represents the natural structures needed for the transplant recipients cells to recognize and populate as part of the tissue repair process.

Bringing such a product to a point that it sees use is a significant challenge. This project will take students through the general steps a start-up research and development company must go through to realize its objectives.

The team will have the benefit of collaborating with professionals representing two start-up organizations. Matrix Odyssey LLC is a company founded by experts in the structure, organization and biology of the mammalian ECM, is a translational and commercialization research focused entity specializing in cartilage repair technology and the rational design of ECM biomaterials. ForeLight, Inc, (situated in the IIT University Technology Park) produces biomaterials for the life sciences, nutritional and agricultural industries using their Illumesis™ photosynthetic growth platform - a modular, scalable artificial bioreactor that provides uniquely controllable conditions for consistent, stable and cost-effective commercial indoor production.

The objective of this IPRO project over one or more semesters is to design and implement a system for creating custom implants made from re-engineered tissues that may become commercially viable products. This will build on the work of Matrix Odyssey LLC (IIT associated company) and Forelight Inc, which have developed the basis for making this objective a reality. Their work includes the production of re-engineered material and its deposition into viable (repair) cartilage implant plugs. What is expected to be achieved with this project, is the development of a production system that could be thought of as a step towards 3D printing of tissue scaffolds.

The IPRO team will be ideally comprised of students majoring in engineering (biomedical, electrical, computer, materials, mechanical, chemical), sciences (biology, chemistry, physics), business, and interested students from other fields will form small task-orientated workteams that collaborate and share progress each week to address the task areas described below:

MODULE 1 WORKTEAM: NOZZLE SPRAY DESIGN & PROTOTYPING. Construct a nozzle spray (the 'print head') specifically designed to work with the new tissue technology rather than simple, small polymers. This requires research into flow speed, pressure and necessary assembly. The team will start with simple manual hydrophilic and syringe systems to develop the most efficient volume and substrate mixtures working upwards to calibrate the pump systems (Mixed team of scientists and engineers).

MODULE 2 WORKTEAM: CONTROL SYSTEM SOFTWARE/HARDWARE INTEGRATION. Develop a control system for Module 1 that incorporates custom developed computer code and small scale equipment building on knowledge gained in Module 1. This requires conceptualization and identification of technology, control circuitry and software to control pump speed, pressure and mixing (Mixed team of engineers and computer scientists).

MODULE 3 WORKTEAM: STERILIZER DESIGN & PROTOTYPING. Design and construct a sterilizer based on a UV illumination array that may safely be applied to the pump system to help prevent bacteriological growth. This requires conceptualization and identification of illumination technology that integrates with Modules 1 and 2, and requires research to identify the best positioning for an anti-bacteriological illumination solution and consideration of relative effectiveness of such positions in the system. (Mixed team of engineering, physics, etc.).

MODULE 4 WORKTEAM: CELL GROWTH STUDIES. Conduct cell growth studies on material produced from Module 1 and then Modules 2 and 3. Requires testing of desired cell growth on substrate, deposited substrate (prospective implant product) and testing of undesired bacteriological growth (product control) in concert with Modules 1-3. Standard mammalian and bacteriological cell growth kits will be used (Mixed team of life scientists and biomedical engineers).

MODULE 5 WORKTEAM: MARKET RESEARCH. Conduct market research to inform (a) product placement, (b) possible valuation of technologies, and (c) identification of competing technologies. This requires an organized market and competitive research study based on publicly available product information, analysis of published patents and patent applications, and phone conversations with both potential buyers and sellers of possible competing products to produce a comparative product and market segmentation analysis. (Mixed team of business and other disciplines).

Note that this IPRO section enrollment is by permit only. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor, Professor Joseph Orgel (orgel@iit.edu) to directly express interest in joining this research project team, sharing how they feel they can contribute to the success of the project and what they hope to gain from the experience. This IPRO project can be particularly attractive to students who wish to gain rigorous experience in an authentic applied research environment, working closely with IIT research faculty and other professionals in a biotech type start-up environment.return to top

497-317: Making an Artificial Pancreas (A Research-Intensive IPRO Project)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 500: to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Ali Cinar (ChBE) (cinar@iit.edu), Erdal Oruklu (ECE) and Laura Forlano (ID)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:



Note that this IPRO section enrollment is by permit only. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor, Professor Ali Cinar (cinar@iit.edu) to directly express interest in joining this research project team, sharing how they feel they can contribute to the success of the project and what they hope to gain from the experience. This IPRO project can be particularly attractive to students who wish to gain rigorous experience in an authentic applied research environment, working closely with a team of IIT research faculty representing engineering and design fields.

It is estimated that 380 million people in the world have diabetes. Five to 10 percent of them have Type 1 diabetes. Since the bodies of people with Type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin, they must receive insulin from external sources. An artificial pancreas automates the delivery of appropriate doses of insulin to patients and attempts to regulate their blood glucose concentrations.

Artificial pancreas research and development has been conducted for over 40 years, but no commercial device is currently available. While the problem looks simple (measure blood glucose concentration, use a control algorithm to compute the insulin needed to bring the glucose concentration to desired level, adjust the flow rate in the insulin pump), the complexities and nonlinearities in the human body, delays in measurements and insulin infusion, reliance exclusively on glucose measurement information provide many challenges. Safety concerns and FDA regulation cause additional constraints.

Novel approaches based on the creativity of students, multidisciplinary collaboration and multivariable framework will provide the opportunity to conceive and develop new artificial pancreas systems. In addition to technical challenges, human-machine interface, psychological issues such as fear of hypoglycemia, and regulatory constraints will provide an open-ended problem that will excite many students.

Our research team at IIT has proposed the first multivariable artificial pancreas control approach that has a better chance of regulating glucose concentrations under a wider range of living conditions of patients and demonstrated its benefits in clinical studies. IPRO team members will have the opportunity to learn the challenges, develop new designs, interact with clinicians and patients, and benefit from the ongoing state-of-the-art research at IIT.

The objectives of the project are to (1) investigate recent developments in various technologies that include glucose sensors, physical activity monitoring systems, control theory, wireless communications, and Android based smartphone app development and (2) to propose artificial pancreas designs that can be used in daily life under a wide range of conditions.

The project is conceived as a sequence of activities that will be conducted across several semesters. The first IPRO will focus on survey of current technologies that can be used for developing an artificial pancreas system based on multivariable control, best practices for human-machine interactions, and patient concerns to develop preliminary designs and evaluate their potential. In future offerings of the IPRO knowledge in these foundations will be updated and artificial pancreas designs will be refined.

Making an artificial pancreas is a multidisciplinary problem that benefits from knowledge and techniques associated with engineering (chemical, biomedical, electrical and computer engineering), computer science, information technology, psychology, human-centered design (including human machine interaction and usability), and medicine. A multidisciplinary team of instructors will guide students in understanding the challenges faced, technical alternatives, potential solutions and regulatory issues. Progress from concept development to evaluation of alternatives, observation of actual use of existing devices, and input from experts in various fields will enable students to propose multivariable artificial pancreas systems in the first year of the IPRO. Depending on student interest and qualification, multiple teams can be formed to approach the problem with alternative proposals.

The project will benefit from multidisciplinary teams to address various technical, social, and regulatory aspects of the problem. Students are expected to develop media in the form of Web pages and Wikis for internal communications of the team and for materials that will be for the general public. Since the artificial pancreas systems have to be evaluated in clinical studies, IPRO team members will also learn about ethical conduct of research, protocol review by Institutional Review Boards (IRB) and regulatory reviews for investigational device exception by FDA. We do not expect that the IPRO projects will be evaluated in clinical studies especially in the first years of the project. But we believe that exposure to these aspects of medical research will be beneficial, particularly to engineering and science students.

Note that this IPRO section enrollment is by permit only. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor, Professor Ali Cinar (cinar@iit.edu) to directly express interest in joining this research project team, sharing how they feel they can contribute to the success of the project and what they hope to gain from the experience. This IPRO project can be particularly attractive to students who wish to gain rigorous experience in an authentic applied research environment, working closely with a team of IIT research faculty representing engineering and design fields.return to top

497-338: Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Electrical Contractors' Association of City of Chicago

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

There is significant energy loss and wasted expense in many existing buildings, especially older ones. Such structures can benefit from a contemporary, methodical review and analysis to identify opportunities for reducing waste and improving energy efficiency.

Working with the IIT office of Energy and Sustainability (OCES), Mayor's Office Retrofit Chicago, and Electrical Contractors' Association of City of Chicago, our IPRO sponsor, we will identify a building that offers an interesting and challenging case and that can benefit from an energy analysis. The outcome will be recommendations for improving energy efficiency in cost-effective and timely ways.

This project will be undertaken within the framework of the national NECA Energy Challenge. Examples of methods that the team will apply include: green and lighting analysis, smart technologies, smart meters and monitoring, communication systems and computer monitoring, energy storage, geothermal and HVAC control systems. return to top

497-339: Developing Insights into IIT Electrical & Utility Vault Design, Water Leakage and Corrosion to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Cost

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Contractors Power & Light and IIT Campus Utilities & Energy

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science

Description:

Across the United States and specifically on the IIT campus there are many old, energy inefficient, poorly designed, corrosive, and environmentally-unfriendly utility vaults that consume energy and require incur maintenance costs. They are in dire need of improved design, maintenance, and upgrading. Liquid infiltration into the vaults can create serious problems, such as pipe and insulation deterioration, cable faults and corrosion, electrical component corrosion and failure, etc. Vaults include: (1) steam or district heating vaults; (2) chilled water or cooling distribution vaults; (3) electrical cable vaults; (4) electrical switchgear vaults; and (5) telecommunication vaults.

Working with the IIT Office of Campus Energy & Sustainability (OCES) and Consumers Power & Light, the objective of this IPRO project is to conduct an energy/utility investigation and analysis of IIT selected utility vaults to (1) identify cause and effect factors and (2) propose creative, environmentally conscious and economically viable solutions to the utility design and maintenance inefficiencies where there currently are no obvious solutions. return to top

497-347: Domus in Horto (House in a Garden)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

People have long dreamed of living in a warm, sunlit environment full of living plants and flowing water. Many people retire to warmer climates like Florida to achieve this dream. Others stay in colder climates but add sunrooms and enclosed porches to help produce the same effect. Science fiction writers have even proposed covering whole cities with giant transparent domes to moderate the climate. In the past 20 years, inexpensive greenhouses which allow crops to be produced in cold climates year round have become common. This IPRO project intends to utilize a greenhouse covering most of a standard Chicago city lot to serve as the exterior envelope for a residential structure. The rest of the residential functions will then be interspersed in the greenhouse amid growing plants and flowing water.

The objective of this IPRO project is to examine the idea of separating the “envelope” of a residential structure from the rest of its functions. The envelope of a building allows in light and heat, but protects the occupants from rain, snow and extreme temperatures. In areas with harsh winters, this means designing a compact building with large windows only on the south side. The envelope of the building protects the residents but does not bring the residents into contact with nature. A heated greenhouse can provide many of the “envelope” functions for the residence. It can keep out rain and snow, allow in copious light and moderate the temperature within the structure. The rest of the functions of the residence can now be freed from the hard, cramped shell which characterizes most residences in temperate climates and distributed throughout the greenhouse. In between these functions can be lovely gardens and productive food growing areas. Trees can be grown to provide shade and ponds and flowing water can be designed to enhance the peace and well-being of the residents. The students will show by their work what beauty and satisfaction could be achieved within such a structure.

The team will achieve its goals through an architectural and engineering analysis of the problem. It will look at the legal and technical issues of how much of the lot can actually be covered by the greenhouse structure and how to treat the balance of the lot not covered by the greenhouse. The team will evaluate and determine how high the structure should be and the best way to heat and cool the greenhouse. The team will investigate spaces within the greenhouse, such as the north wall, where insulation can be installed, and also whether moveable insulation can be installed in the greenhouse during the evenings. They will examine how the house can be ventilated during the summer and protected from outside threats. Several different sub-teams will explore how the balance of the living functions of the residence can be distributed throughout the greenhouse. The team will produce drawings, calculations and renderings of the proposed structures to show the potential of this type of residential construction. return to top

497-348: Large-Scale Solar Desalination in the Sahara

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

Global warming is slowly melting all the ice on earth. The fear is that this warming will continue for a long time since it is being fueled by higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere generated by burning fossil fuels. As the ice melts, it will cause the level of the oceans to rise, creating flooding in many of the major cities on earth, and making some of them partially or totally uninhabitable.

At the very same time, there are arid places on earth that could use this water. The largest desert in the world is the Sahara Desert, which covers most of northern Africa, the second largest continent. Due to the heat and lack of water, the Sahara is almost entirely uninhabited. If water could be brought from the ocean to these dry areas and desalinated, they could support people in an area of the world which has large and rapidly growing populations. The water would also quickly evaporate, adding to the cloud cover, and reducing the pace of global warming.

Two of the four lowest areas on earth are in the Sahara desert. The Afar Depression in Djibouti is 155m. (508 ft.) below sea level and 122 km (79 miles) from the Red Sea. The Qattara Depression in Egypt is 122 m. (436 ft.) deep and is only 88 km (55 miles) from the Mediterranean Sea. Bringing seawater to depressed areas near the ocean would significantly reduce the costs of delivering the water. Simple canals and conduits could be used for transporting water without pumps. The water could be distilled through simply, and cheaply built, plastic solar greenhouses. During the hot, cloudless days, the water would be evaporated rapidly from the sea water. At night, the desert temperatures drop quite rapidly, and the water vapor would be condensed back into potable water. Once the water was distilled, it could be used for farming. Many desert soils become extremely productive once water becomes available. (Just look at central California as an example of what irrigation in the desert can produce.)

The salt could be processed both for its use as salt (“sea salt”) but also processed to remove metals and other valuable industrial chemicals. Unneeded salt could be returned to the oceans.

The objective of this IPRO project is to present a technically challenging project for the students to analyze and design around. The IPRO team will be investigating the environmental, technical and political feasibility of doing this large-scale desalination project in the desert. The team will be identifying the potential sites to see which ones might also have good soil for growing plants, designing the solar greenhouses which would be performing the distillations, and determining the amounts of water which could be processed as part of such a process. The team will be estimating the costs for doing the project and the value of the benefits which would result. The team will be looking at the types of salt processing which would be done profitably, and will devise methods to process the salt. The team will select the types of crops that can be grown in mildly saline water, and investigate ways to conserve agricultural water in the desert.

The IPRO team will identify Sahara sites which would be suitable for this type of development. It will seek to identify the types of soil that exist in these depressions to see if any are suitable for farming, and what types of soil amendments would be necessary. The team will examine other large scale projects which are being proposed for the Sahara including DESERTEC (large scale solar energy farms in the desert which is being supported by many large European companies) to see how they have been received and how they plan on implementing them. The team will study the civil engineering challenges of controlling the movement of water from the ocean to these locations. The team will design the solar distillation “greenhouses” and develop the process for recovering and storing the water and salt produced by the process. return to top

497-350: Mobilus: Robotic Standing Wheelchair with Arm Component

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Kevin Meade (MMAE) (meade@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

How can individuals with limited mobility handicaps be more independent? Modern mobility devices, especially wheelchairs, are limited in their capabilities. Long-term sitting can lead to both health and social problems, and much of the body is kept so stationary that any chances of healing are greatly reduced. I know that a new wheelchair design could increase a handicapped person’s independence, as well as improve both their quantity and quality of life.

There is a segment of the population which doesn’t fit into the binary condition of either being in a wheelchair or not being in one. There is more variety to what people need. The elderly and infirm can suffer a very slow decline over many years. Other diseases just result in a very slow recovery. An afflicted person needs to be able to stand, or at least sit in an upright position, to interact with the world, maintain independence and keep mobile and active. This is what we want to design a new wheelchair to address. Using our education and skills to help the handicapped gain independence and increase their ability to heal is a meaningful challenge we intend to address.

Robert Wootten, the father of current IIT ME major Sady Wootten, has been a mechanical engineer with Ball Aerospace for over thirty years. Because of his avocation for sculpturing, he became acquainted with a sculptor with multiple sclerosis. This led to Mr. Wootten’s efforts to design a wheelchair that could support a disabled person in a standing position so that s/he could have greater range and flexibility for various activities. Prototypes were built but have not been refined and much work needs to be done so that an articulating wheelchair can be manufactured. IIT students now have the opportunity to reimagine and advance the project, refine and modernize its design, build new prototypes and advance toward user-testing.

We anticipate that this Mobilus IPRO project requires at least three semesters. It began via an independent study in fall 2014 undertaken by Saddy Wootten. This is laying the foundation for establishing a plan for at least the next two semesters as an IPRO project, beginning in spring 2015. Ultimately, the goal is to have a working prototype chair which allows a user to: (1) Get in and out of the chair without assistance from another person; (2) Make use of a motorized system which can provide the user with an elevated sitting position or fully supported standing position; (3) Adjust back support, seat angle, footplate and arm supports independently to allow a user to maintain comfort; and (4) Use different elements of the chair in a manner that functions as mild physical therapy and keeps a user’s joints from atrophying. In addition to the chair, the IPRO team will aim to design an arm prosthesis which addresses the needs of individuals who experience supination of the arm.

The spring 2015 semester IPRO team will focus on chair design and analysis. We will conduct any necessary secondary research, including developing a deep understanding of current wheelchair solutions and ergonomics. The team will observe those confined to wheelchairs and understand their limitations and potential for benefitting from new wheelchair solutions, documenting their observations and identifying important insights that can inform their thinking going forward. This will lead to brainstorming and creating conceptual designs that address user needs and offer sound ergonomic solutions. Viable alternative design concepts may emerge from this work. This could lead to developing engineering simulations of concepts to evaluate and validate design direction.

The experience, progress and outcomes of the spring 2015 team will determine the actual next steps for subsequent semesters. A “stretch” goal for the first semester is to have a complete illustrated design, structural/dynamic analysis and mass properties analysis. Working drawings would then be created for parts that require fabrication, as well as a bill of materials with sources of supply. Additionally, the IPRO team would develop and test the software and establish the documentation supporting it. An overall project plan would be created with a schedule for developing and testing subsystems that are then integrated into a working prototype. The aim is to ideally be in a position to order parts over the summer of 2015 so that they are available for a fall 2015 team. Once a design is created and finalized, the next phase of the IPRO project will focus on construction, testing, documenting results, and redesigning for improvements.return to top

497-354: Creating Process Improvements

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm.

Sponsor:

Quam-Nichols Company

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering

Description:

Quam-Nichols Company was established in 1930 on the south side of Chicago where it still operates today. In the early years, much of the manufacturing of "store-bought" radios was done in the Midwest and Quam-Nichols was the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) for the speakers found in most of the brand name radios of the time, and then televisions and other consumer electronics after that. Today, Quam continues to design and manufacture a wide scope of loudspeaker and installation solutions for the changing installed sound industry. If the project involves signaling, sound masking, voice or music, look to Quam as your "problem solver." (http://quamspeakers.com)

Several of the processes that produce the speakers could benefit from fresh perspectives. These processes include stamping, welding, powder coating, testing and final assembly. The objectives of this IPRO project are two-fold: (1) Improve the productivity of a selected process and (2) Improve the quality of a selected process.

This IPRO project offers students the opportunity to gain practical experience in working directly with a private company to understand and analyze various manufacturing challenges and develop innovative and economical solutions. This will involve several steps that include: (1) Observe daily operations; (2) Gather pertinent data relating to the issue; (3) Interview process owners of the issue for their perspective; (4) Propose sponsor approved alternatives to improve the issue; (5) Select a pilot area for testing of the proposed alternative; (6) Test the alternative; (7) Learn what happened, adjust where necessary, measure impact; and (8) Try again until satisfactory improvements are achieved.

The IPRO team will devote time to observing operations and recording data at the sponsor’s facility. The remainder of the time will be spent researching and developing candidate solution pathways. The students will also periodically be presenting their progress to Quam Nichols management.return to top

497-356: Techno-Business User-Application Trends Analysis of US Motor & Transformer Electricity Consumption

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com) in consultation with Ian Brown (ECE) (ibrown1@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

Did you know that upwards of 60 percent of the electricity generated in the US has been attributed to motors? Even a one percent improvement in average motor efficiency would save a huge amount of electricity and reduce the need for new power generating stations. (Source: A.D.Little circa 1975)

Since the mid-1970's no study has been completed to model electricity consumption in motors and transformers in the US. However, in the early 2000's the US Department of Energy (DOE) introduced energy regulations that progressively enforce improved energy efficiency in a selected range of distribution transformers. At the same time, the National Electric Motor Association (NEMA) has developed guidelines for a progressive improvement in energy efficiency for a range of industrial-sized motors. Similar initiatives have begun in Europe and other regions of the globe.

In spite of these steps by government agencies and industry associations, there remain problems and challenges that affect dramatic shifts to more efficient motors and transformers, which in turn affects energy consumption. This is in part due to the fact that while everyone believes that improvements in energy efficiency are worthwhile, no one has quantified the benefits nor undertaken a cost/benefit analysis. The NEMA guidelines are not enforceable so motor manufacturers do not have a major incentive for improvement. There is also a gap in knowledge on how to improve motor efficiencies in the most cost-effective way possible. Finally, there is no coherent body of information that combines motor engineering principles, consumption statistics, and effects of energy efficiency improvements into a model that can offer insights and lead to recommendations that can be used by DOE and others to shape and influence public policy and energy strategy.

Given this background and opportunity, Tempel (http://www.tempel.com) is interested in continuing to work with an IPRO team over multiple semesters to establish the coherent body of information described above.

The objective of the spring 2015 semester project is currently being formulated; however, it will build on the work of the previous IPRO teams. The fall 2014 IPRO team is currently developing an understanding of the impact of various standards/legislations that are focused on improving energy efficiency of motors. The team is expected to provide high-level recommendations on strategic direction that Tempel should pursue based on upcoming changes. Areas taht are being explored include: (1) Detailed assessment of each standard that are driving energy efficiency requirements of motors (e.g. IE3, IE4, NEMA premium etc.) (By region, by year, by motor type etc.); (2) Impact on motor manufacturers and downstream players/vendors (quantify the impact - how would it impact the price of motor and by how much, how much money the key players will invest to meet the standards and in what time-frame etc.); (3) Key actions that motor companies will take to comply with new standards (Qualitative assessment via primary research); and (4) What it means to Tempel and other lamination players; and key recommendations for Tempel on how to leverage upcoming changes and grow sales and profits. The goals of the spring 2015 team will build on these findings.

The approach of the IPRO team for the spring 2015 semester will be similar to the previous semesters of the project in order to advance the subject of motor efficiency. The team will continue to conduct appropriate research, share findings with team members and explore solutions. The overall goal continues to be to formulate an action plan with specific actions and goals that if implemented could move the electric motor industry to improved efficiency.

The above IPRO purpose can be aided by conducting broad secondary research, as well as surveying major motor and transformer manufacturers and other sources of information. This study could involve investigation of appropriate algorithms and models for depicting and understanding electricity consumption due to motors and transformers and the drivers of technological change that affect future enabling technologies, products, applications, markets and competition. This work could establish a baseline of motor and transformer energy consumption that could be monitored over time to determine progress made toward fully realizing potential energy savings through improved motor and transformer efficiencies. This work could also help to inform public policy strategies combinations of regulations and incentives that stimulate innovation in motor and transformer efficiency improvements. Finally, there may be opportunities for such motor and transformer efficiency and consumption patterns at various levels and in various industries to inform the research, design and planning process for lamination manufacture. A great example is the long term market penetration expected for hybrid and electric vehicles and their demand for motors as well as demand for power, whether via conventional sources or renewables.

This IPRO team will have the benefit of a balanced instructor team in learning and applying market research and survey methods that help to capture trend information, identify insights and conceptualize opportunities. IIT faculty expertise in power conversion technologies, power electronics and electric machines is also an important resource for the IPRO team in understanding motor and transformer technologies and trends.return to top

497-359: The Simularium: Exploring Opportunities for an Immersive Environment with 3D Visualization at IIT

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 7:40 pm.

Sponsor:

Robert Babbin, IIT Faculty Member

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmkinn5@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Psychology

Description:

Currently, only the largest of building industry companies can afford and benefit from leading edge technology. The broader building industry has a great deal to gain in cost, schedule, and quality management by the advancements in digital technology. This IPRO project is developing a visualization, communication and management system called a Simularium that will be in the financial reach of a broader building industry user base.

We are at the forefront of the digital frontier and the background of making it affordable and finding effective applications for the building industry. This frontier offers opportunities of simplicity and efficiency as well as changing the way we currently build buildings. Our objective is to create a 'poor man's' digital cave -- a Simularium that can offer inter- and intra- office visualization, communication and management benefits to architects, engineers, contractors, sub-contractors as well as clients.

This is a continuing IPRO project. The objective of the fall 2014 IPRO team has had the primary objective of creating an affordable simulation environment. To-date, the team has: (1) explored the history of simulation environments; (2) researched hardware, software and costs related to simulated environment technology; (3) analyzed the design of simulation screens and projector mounts; (4) identified the equipment needed for our simulation environment (which will include the building of a custom computer system for use by the College of Architecture after the IPRO project is completed); and (5) ordered initial equipment and materials.

It is anticipated that only one basic simulation system will be created through the semester with a projected component cost of $12,000. During the spring 2015 second semester of this IPRO project, our objectives will be to:
  1. continue research of evolving simulation technology;
  2. establish the basis for achieving the most effective simulation effect ((a) refining design of screen and projector mounting structure for ease of shipping, assembly, storage; (b) enhancing the interface of projectors, filters, software, head tracking, motion tracking, and custom-built computer; and (c) developing the 3D simulation effect); and
  3. develop the product and materials list with an end goal cost of less than $10,000 ((a) discussing bulk purchase options with product suppliers; and (b) developing packaging strategy and housing for all components.


The IPRO team will build on its research of simulation technology, its applications and costs. Parallel to this, the team will further document the role, function, benefits and cost of this technology. The team will filter this information through a design process toward creating a working (full scale) prototype and a cost benefit analysis by the end of the semester.

Ideally, the IPRO team will be comprised of students representing the following types of majors: electrical engineering, computer science, mechanical engineering, architecture, psychology, information technology, and business. All students interested in this topic are welcome to join the team.return to top

497-363: IIT Pride: Improving Student & University Community Engagement

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays from 8:35 to 11:15 am.

Sponsor:

In collaboration with IIT Athletics, Dean of Students and other IIT organizations

Faculty:

Steve Hammond (ID) (stevehammond1@mac.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Spirit and pride are complex phenomena that can make the educational experience more rewarding and satisfying. Developing pride requires cultural and climate shifts for the institution's community and commitment from a wide range of constituencies. This IPRO project will explore the complex nature of school pride in all aspects of college life. This IPRO project’s history began in athletics and has expanded to other opportunities in the college community. The team will draw on work done by prior IPRO teams for inspiration and will work on problem definitions and solutions of their own choosing. This self-directed aspect is an important element of the project. After developing their own perspective on the challenge, students will develop and implement projects to develop pride in the community.

The objective of the IPRO project is to identify areas where the students can affect pride and engagement at IIT. Teams will define challenges using techniques from design, creative problem solving and non-directive coaching. Through repetitive use of both generative and evaluative tools, self-directed teams will work to develop solutions that aim to build pride in IIT. The team will learn about innovation processes and will use them to develop their deliverables. A key objective is learning what works, what doesn't and why. Based on progress by prior teams, the scope of the project will likely expand beyond athletics and the on-campus population to include commuters, graduate students, faculty, alumni and others.

There are several "legacy" threads that would be encouraged for study. An example is institutionalizing an app developed by a prior group. While well-received, the app was not sustainable past the semester. How might this be overcome?

The team will use a combination of tools used by designers, creative problem solvers and leadership coaches. Each student will have the opportunity to gain experience in managing the agenda and execution of a class session. Team members will choose the sub-challenges they wish to pursue and will have opportunities to take on different roles during the project. Teamwork and the dynamics of team formation and development and adapting to change and unexpected developments are an important part of the team project experience. return to top

497-364: Developing a Campus News Videography Experience

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Masha Safina (ID) (msafina@id.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

IIT is a diverse community of cultures and interests, across the student body (undergraduate and graduate) as well as university leadership, faculty, staff, alumni and other stakeholders. Each student has the challenge of keeping informed about what matters in their academic and social lives, and sometimes it is hard to identify or appreciate what should matter. A solid foundation for communication broadly defined is essential in achieving academic success and building a good, supportive and lasting network of friends and colleagues.

While historically, written communication or personal discussion was the norm, these days, social media rules. When students need to get up to speed on an issue or have a question, they turn to the web and search. When students have a concern or question, a popular option has been to express it via such forums as Facebook groups, Twitter updates, Instagram, etc. These highly social and virtual real-time forms of communication offer an outlet for sharing experiences and expression.

Even so, and in spite of the ability of young people to multi-task and communicate across multiple channels, it is amazing how one’s ability to absorb and process information can be limited to the point that students may revisit/rehash issues that have already been addressed or be totally misinformed through multiple information filters. For example, there may be issues that arise related to the IIT student community that might be addressed in one forum with IIT leadership, but attendance is limited and the information that is reported through Tech News, IIT Today or other student communications may not convey the message as well as actually “being there.” The next best thing to being there is being able to access a video of the activity, event, talk, etc.

This IPRO project is focused to improving communication across the university through the technique of videography. More specifically, the power of video capture (as well as interviewing and editing) will enable individual students in our community to capture events, conversations, messages of various members of the community in a professional manner that can be shared in a timely way with the entire community. The experience of personal video expression has been popularized by YouTube and even become an IPRO team course requirement. We wish to capitalize on this trend, offering a compelling opportunity for capturing various facets of the IIT experience, i.e., “channeling IIT” through video updates, interviews, reviews, etc. This content has extended value as well for other IIT stakeholders.

The first objective will be for the team to articulate a purpose and mission for a videography capability and experience at IIT and explore how it can be integrated with existing news and information channels in a harmonious way. This would lead to investigating best practices associated with news capture, interviewing, editing, archiving, etc. An emphasis on professionalism and ethical practice is key to creating a new videography information channel on campus that will be trusted and respected. All of these issues need to be explored with all of the IIT stakeholders in order to capture the insights that can help frame an appropriate videography service to the university’s constituents.

Once research has been completed, a mission established and a framework of operation created, the team can consider the range of videography scenarios and how to build competency for anyone wishing to submit content. This can be accomplished by members of the team doing “prototyping” of the videography experience in areas of interest to them. The sub-teams doing the prototyping will gain experience in planning, executing interviews, editing and publishing their work. Overall, the team can create a process for posting the videos and obtaining feedback from those who view them. The team’s insights will help shape the policies and practices of an IIT videography service/experience. Ranging from individuals and organizations on campus, to exhibits and events throughout the city, this IIT videography service/experience has the potential to enrich, inspire and involve all of our students.

This IPRO project has been conceived by Elvin Moy, mechanical engineering.return to top