IPRO Current Listings for Summer 2014

IPRO 000
IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SUMMER 2014
IPRO 397-300
Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.)
IPRO 497-320
Urban Agriculture Bronzeville
IPRO 497-358
The SmartHat: A Construction Communications System
IPRO 497-368
Community Engagement Cluster Legacy Projects
IPRO 497-369
UFarmIIT: Growing Community
IPRO 497-370
Urban Activators: Community Storefront -- A Tool for Revitalization
IPRO 497-371
Creating a Reliable Sports Players' Statistical Performance Evaluation Methodology
IPRO 497-372
Developing a Comparative Analysis of Compost and Mulch in the Context of Illinois Environmental Regulations
IPRO 497-373
Supermarket Food Service Life Style Experience Design
IPRO 497-376
Achieving Work/Life Balance in the Digital Age AND Understanding the Millenial in the Workplace
IPRO 497-378
Developing Workspace Innovation Concepts that Stimulate Cross-Functional Collaboration
IPRO 497-379
PassLok: User-Friendly Privacy Apps for the Web

000: IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SUMMER 2014

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Meeting Days/Time:

All summer IPRO sections are scheduled for Session B which begins June 2 and concludes July 26.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Appropriate Disciplines:

Description:

Summer 2014 IPRO sections will be listed here by the end of March. At the same time, the IPRO sections will be listed under the subject "Interprofessional Project" by the registrar in the MyIIT portal for registration. All summer IPRO sections are scheduled for Session B which begins June 2 and concludes July 26.

We encourage students contemplating taking a summer IPRO course to come to the IPRO Registration Fair in the MTCC Bridge on Tuesday, April 1, between 12 noon and 5 pm to meet IPRO instructors and learn more about projects being offered.

We are offering the following IPRO options for summer 2014:

One IPRO 397-xxx section will be offered for students taking their first IPRO course.

On the order of 10 traditional IPRO 497-3xx sections with 10 to 12 students each will be offered for students taking either their first or second IPRO course.

No themed cluster sections are being offered for summer 2014, although projects that evolved from the spring 2014 themed clusters may be offered as IPRO 497-3xx sections.

IPRO sections are set up with capacity limits and limits on the number of students from the majors that are expected to be most attracted to a specific IPRO project. If you are unable to register because the section is closed or there is any other restriction, you are urged to consider other IPRO sections that interest you. You may also add yourself to the wait list for a closed IPRO section. Students who are waitlisted will be reviewed by the IPRO Program staff and instructor if there is an opportunity to add students to a given IPRO section.

Questions about choosing an IPRO project and IPRO registration can be directed to Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-300: Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B which begins on June 2 and concludes on July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu)tors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with a focus on digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with a focus on product design) or IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower. For summer 2014, only IPRO 397-300 is being offered in Session B beginning June 2 and concluding July 26.

Interprofessional by Design introduces students to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO projects conceived by students that became regular IPRO team projects include: Renovation of the Ramova Theatre, MORE Life, Simply Park, Language Link, Aging in Place, LegoArt, Enabling Blind Sailors to Sail Independently, Bridging the Generations via Digital+Physical Gaming, and IIT Pride: Developing Strategies for Student Engagement at Athletic Events.

Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

497-320: Urban Agriculture Bronzeville

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 8:50 to 11:30 am AND 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 25)

Sponsor:

In collaboration with Bronzeville Urban Development

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Business, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

Five previous IPRO project teams have conducted research on developing agriculture on vacant lots in Chicago. This work has included research on soil testing, debris removal and recycling, soil amendment and suitable crops for producing food, fuel and fiber. Most of the vacant lots have previously been occupied by residential or commercial buildings. At some point, these buildings were demolished and the lot became vacant. Often the building was knocked down into the basement, and the debris was covered by a thin layer of subsoil from some other construction site. Usually the site still contains much of the concrete from the foundations of the previous buildings. Subsequently, trash was often dumped on the site, cars were parked on the lots, and the subsoil was compacted so that many of the vacant lots cannot even grow weeds at the present time. There are 70,000 vacant lots owned by the City of Chicago, and at least twice as many privately owned lots. These lots bring down the neighborhoods in which they are located. The work of these IPROs has focused on how to make these vacant lots into community assets.

The objective of this IPRO project for summer 2014 is to operationalize the research in Bronzeville with our partner, Bronzeville Urban Development. Bronzeville is a developing community adjacent to IIT and serves as a bridge between IIT and the University of Chicago. It is a community with some problems including pockets of poverty, aging infrastructure and vacant lots left by years of neglect. The project aims to use what are currently unused community assets (abandoned railroad line, electrical substation and several city-owned vacant lots) to develop an urban food-raising core in the neighborhood. This core will turn a negative aspect of the community into a strength and will provide food in a food desert, employ unemployed people and develop a community and cultural asset in Bronzeville.

While most of the Bronzeville Urban Development project is planned for the top of the abandoned railroad line embankments, there are half-a-dozen lots that are at ground level. B.U.D. would like to develop these as urban farming sites. This IPRO will start operationalizing the process of developing the lots. This will include testing the soil, determining the efficacy of the soil preparation processes, determining the optimal soil amendments, and determining which species to plant.

Please note that this IPRO section is scheduled for to meet only on Fridays each week over a span of time from about 9 am to 3 pm with time for lunch and breaks. This is intended to provide greater quality time for fieldwork on sites by devoting a single solid block of time during the week.return to top

497-358: The SmartHat: A Construction Communications System

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Robert Babbin

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmckinn5@iit.edu or naoibri@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

This IPRO project continues the spring 2014 IPRO 358 work in order to further develop the Smart Hat to the next stage-- from research and conceptual prototypes to more enhanced, functional prototypes and continued engagement with component sources and technologies, supports, etc.

The objective of the project is to integrate current smart phone, Building Information Modeling (BIM) and augmented reality technology, etc. to the construction site via the safety helmet to establish a safer and more productive construction communication and management process. Some of our research and reference material to date can be found at http://ipro358.wordpress.com/.

Through the eight-week summer session, the IPRO team will evaluate the research and progress of the spring semester and follow that team's recommended next steps to refine the SmartHat. This is likely to include developing the details and interface between the hard hat and the electronic components -- projector, recorder, viewing device, sensors, etc. In addition, the team will challenge the material, wearable and functional decisions made by the spring IPRO 358 team and derive at least one alternative approach to the SmartHat. The summer team will also establish the fabrication cost of the working model(s) and develop and advance the SmartHat branding. In addition to the typical IPRO deliverables, the objective is to have at least one well-refined, working prototype that can be promoted to investors, manufacturers, etc.return to top

497-368: Community Engagement Cluster Legacy Projects

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Joseph Clair (ARCH) (joseph@josephclair.com), Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com) and William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Professional & Technical Communication, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

There are two or three IPRO team topics under the umbrella of this community engagement IPRO section that represent legacy projects that have evolved from the spring 2014 community engagement IPRO activities, as summarized below:

PROJECTING A REVITALIZED BRONZEVILLE

The overall purpose of this IPRO project is to identify how to take an innovative community revitalization idea and turn it into a self-sustaining program.

The Bronzeville team of the 2013-2014 Community Engagement cluster identified important historical nodes as a key to community revitalization (1st semester), then honed in on a specific idea to take one of the historic buildings of the community - The Forum - and design an event around "projection bombing" (the use of multi-media displays directly onto the surface of a building) to draw attention to the present and future possibilities. This summer, IPRO 375 will demonstrate the viability of the concept by planning and executing the event, and more importantly, will identify the opportunities to deliver similar events at the same site and other historic sites around Bronzeville. The key will be to establish partnerships and identify regular revenue streams associated with the events so that each successful implementation can beget another "projection bombing" event.

The team will receive a project timeline and 50 percent of a design for a "projection bombing" event from the Spring IPRO team. The Summer IPRO team will work with the IIT Office of Community Affairs to engage new partners in the event, and undertake any additional fundraising necessary to bring the event to fruition.

More importantly, while these steps are happening, the Summer IPRO team will: (1) Identify the priority order for other similar events given the constraints of the existing format; (2) Identify limitations on the execution of the event at each of the possible locations; (3) Review the current budget for the event and identify areas for potential cost savings as the project is scaled up from one to many events; (4) Create a three-year plan for executing the events; (5) Create the basic business model for building on one event to create future events; (6) Predict the quantifiable community development benefits that should accrue from the event and create a report template that can be used to determine the success of the event and potential for replication.

THE 95TH STREET CORRIDOR TO THE WORLD PROJECT

The 95th Street Corridor to the World Project serves to identify and address the needs of the nearby Princeton Park community and the West Chesterfield community association that are located west and east of the 95th & the Dan Ryan Redline Station. As part of the larger Roseland community, Princeton Park is named for a 1944 development that replaced farmland with a park surrounded by houses. West Chesterfield conversely is a well-established community organization that has been in existence for several years. Critical relationships have been established with various neighborhood organizations that allow unfettered contact with real stakeholders (community leaders, religious organizations, residents, and business owners). The IPRO team will meet these stakeholders, identify their needs, respond to their needs, and present results to them.

Princeton Park is a five-block by seven-block Chicago neighborhood that remains extremely walk-friendly and borders the 95th street stop of the CTA Red Line. West Chesterfield borders the west side of the CTA Red Line to King Drive from 95th Street to 87th Street. The CTA stop allows the bulk of the neighborhood to be considered transit-oriented which provides unique development opportunities that other neighborhoods do not have. Another unique amenity is the planned redevelopment of the 95th Street Redline Stop that will be built across 95th Street and an existing pedestrian bridge connecting school children to their elementary school east of the Dan Ryan.

Projects undertaken by previous IPRO teams under the concept of a Princeton Park Collaborative have included the adaptive reuse of a previous church into a community center and the design of a 70-unit assisted senior living facility. The community center board is currently using the information provided by the current IPRO team in its search for funding. The work of the team has included the development of needed programs; code and zoning analysis; construction and operating budgets; schematic architectural and systems design; and a needs assessment conducted of the community. Through the work of this IPRO team, the Corridor to the World Project is destined to leave a long-lasting impact on this community interested in maintaining its identity and providing for its residents.return to top

497-369: UFarmIIT: Growing Community

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Rodger Cooley (jrojet@yahoo.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

The health and well being of individuals, communities and environments in the United States are challenged and compromised by the dominant industrial food system. Obesity, diabetes and other diet related diseases, waste of organic nutrients, massive water pollution, and excessive green houses gasses are linked to how food is produced, harvested, distributed, processed, marketed, prepared and consumed. The vast majority of fresh produce travels over 1200 miles to get to Chicago. Produce is harvested early before it is at peak ripeness, processed at multiple steps and retailed 7-10 days after picking. This leads to a loss of nutritional value and taste all along the chain before it consumed. Because of the standardization of fruit and vegetable production, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization calculated 75 percent of crop diversity has been lost since 1900. A loss of diversity and genetics never researched for qualities such as disease and pest resistance, drought tolerance, and nutritional benefits. There are many other urban and market trends and motivating factors that have stimulated the urban agriculture movement.

Since its inception in the Spring of 2012 as IPRO 314, UFarmIIT has been adding elements and partners to address the problems of the dominant food system using the opportunities provided by urban agriculture. UFarmIIT is now a student farm, community garden and student organization. UFarmIIT is providing IIT for urban agriculture and is providing hands on learning opportunities for students.

Similar projects at other universities have started at this basic level and grew over time to become robust programs providing diverse educational opportunities and career pathways for students; incorporating many departments through research, curriculum, and projects; generating revenue through sales, grants and donations; providing access to healthy produce for local communities; and positive attention and differentiation for the universities.

Access to safe healthy fresh food remains an issue in Bronzeville and the immediate areas surrounding IIT. The IIT campus and Bronzeville have underutilized land and wasted green spaces. Student interest continues to grow in urban agriculture and in many of the related issues such as addressing storm water, growing trees for the campus and community, supplying native habitat, improving nutrition and creating living laboratories, are all opportunities for an urban agriculture program to explore.

Since 2012, the IPRO has partnered with IIT Facilities to reuse wood chips from fallen trees on campus, provide water to the site, develop a site for bees, and secure a space for future aquaponics systems; the ARCH First Year studio to design, build and install innovative “living” fence panels; the UFarmIIT student group to provides space for alumni, students, staff and faculty for personal garden plots; the St. James Church’s Food Pantry to provide multiple deliveries of surplus produce; the Biology Department Labs for space to grow mushrooms. Other partnerships and activities in development include building out and launching an aquaponics system on campus; furthering work on an remote sensor system to wirelessly monitor conditions on the farm; working with IFSH to help develop safe handling guidelines for fresh produce and value added products; launching a tree nursery with Facilities; providing space for learning projects for the Boeing Scholars program; and assisting local elementary, middle and high schools with their own gardening programs.

The Summer 2014 IPRO will focus on three projects: (1) Detailing the plan for an Urban Agriculture Program at IIT to provide opportunities for students, staff and faculty to use expanding urban agriculture on IIT's campus and the larger neighborhood; (2) Continue work on remote sensor system to track and monitor then provide real-time notifications of the growing conditions on the farm as well as at the new aquaponics facility; and (3) Continue progress on developing aquaponics system and space in Tech Park Central Room BB11.

The Summer 2014 IPRO will be tasked with solidifying the ideas, research and feedback from previous semesters into a coherent plan and proposal for instituting a dynamic urban agriculture program on IIT's campus that is actively engaged with the Bronzeville community. Students will field test their draft proposals by getting feedback from stakeholders through out the semester.

Students will be also able to select from the following hands on projects to focus on more selectively on over the summer session including remote sensor hardware and software, and furthering progress on developing aquaponic systems on campus.

The summer 2014 IPRO will organize into teams to focus on different aspects of the urban agriculture program plan:

1. IIT Urban Agriculture Vision: Team will pull together previous research and outreach to describe, illustrate and explain the program involving physical elements (UFarmIIT, 30th St/State St, Bee hives, Aquaponics, Composting), curriculum development (Minor, Certificate, Internships), and the Bronzeville community (IIT Community Relations, local organizations, schools and gardens). The team will need to make an easily understood and attractive set of communication materials. Team with gather feed back from stakeholders in the urban agriculture plan.

2. Technology: Team will continue work on aquaponics, embedded onsite sensors, calculating alternative energy needs.

3. Aquaponics: Using learning from the system built and research from the Spring ’14 semester, students will move to building and installing a system in the newly acquired space in Tech Central BB11. Students will partner with the remote sensor team as well.

The first week will involve team-building activities to gain an understanding of each of the team members’ skills, knowledge and attitudes. Discussions will be held on mutual expectations for team members and values for each team.

Teams will develop and present a draft project management plan for the summer semester in the first session of the second week. To help manage this plan, teams will post weekly updates to an existing blog. Teams will be required to set up a communication method accessible for all members. There will be regular full IPRO meetings to ensure all students are engaged and connected to the rest of the IPRO’s projects and process.

As in previous semesters, students will address the ethics component of the project by developing an appreciation for relevant food system issues and undertake small group projects, researching and presenting back to the entire IPRO. Students also will be led through a Dismantling-Racism and Cultural Competency training session to elevate student awareness of the context of working with the communities surrounding IIT and inequities in the current food system. return to top

497-370: Urban Activators: Community Storefront -- A Tool for Revitalization

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

In collaboration with Bronzeville Retail Alliance, 51st Street Business Alliance, Urban Partnership Bank, Alderman Pat Dowell's 3rd Ward Office, Urban Juncture Foundation, Friends of the Forum, Metropolitan Planning Council and IIT Office of Community Affairs & Outreach

Faculty:

Monica Chadha (ARCH) (mchadha1@iit.edu) and Betsy Williams (ARCH) (ewillia9@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Electrical Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

Traditionally, development in neighborhoods has occurred through a long term planning process. These efforts take several years and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to complete. The recommendations from these plans are costly and it is difficult to evaluate the success of the work until it has been actualized. This has been a problematic approach due to its length of time and costs. In our current economic context it is difficult to even justify some of the long term planning efforts without the ability to measure its possibility for success.

A new trend has emerged within communities and neighborhoods. There has been a push to come up with smaller scale, quick and less costly actions that test the ideals of the long term plans. Many call these efforts placemaking. Placemaking is defined as “ a multi-faceted approach to the planning, design and management of public spaces” that includes community feedback to discover the needs and aspirations of the community. This is used to create a common vision that can “quickly evolve into an implementation strategy, beginning with small-scale, do-able improvements that can immediately bring benefits to public spaces and the people who use them” (www.pps.org)Students will have the opportunity to explore these challenges and ultimately create a toolkit and short term activation that can address the larger issues of economic development.

The IPRO team will look at the broader issues around retail and how best practices of retail might need to be altered for emerging neighborhoods. It will focus on economic development opportunities and develop a plan of action for the 51st Street Commercial Corridor in relation to vacant storefronts. This will include creating a portable prototype for activating a commercial storefront as well as develop a toolkit and strategic marketing for small businesses. The team will have the opportunity to participate in a community revitalization project, collaborate with organizations outside of school and create a visual and physical example that reflects a long-term strategic plan.

Students do not often have the opportunity to engage with communities outside the school and develop partnerships. This IPRO project seeks to create a model for projects that are based on the needs identified locally by community organizations and residents. The resulting projects should be able to be supported by the community; the project should not end or cease to exist once the students step away.

The IPRO team will engage with the community, local organizations and city officials to understand local needs and to identify specifics of the project. Through this experience, the team will develop a model for community engagement and a participatory design process. Through the course of the semester students will conduct research, engage in outreach and develop schematic plans, design, build and test a prototype on site and obtain feedback that informs further prototyping and implementation planning. return to top

497-371: Creating a Reliable Sports Players' Statistical Performance Evaluation Methodology

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Information Technology & Management, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

There have been discrepancies in rating baseball players’ performance using the statistical IRA (Individual Ratio Analysis) which has not always been accurate, has biases, and has been detrimental to players’ careers and the team. Sports franchises could benefit from a better way of determining sports players’ performance that is a more accurate reflection of players’ performance and worth to the team.

The objective of this IPRO project is to explore statistical and non-statistical methods of evaluating sports players’ performance that offer more reliable and accurate evaluation of players’ performance and worth to a team. The objective is also to include a performance rating system that takes into account the player’s performance and the team’s performance with a solid statistical basis.

This IPRO project is proposed to span two semesters, summer and fall 2014, requiring collaboration from many fields of study -- engineering, computer science, business, architecture, etc. The IPRO team will take an open-ended approach to addressing the problem statement. The analysis, brainstorming alternatives, statistical analysis, algorithms, prototyping, business model development and planning for this project require a wide range of student backgrounds and interests that can creatively identify and validate potential commercial applications and markets. return to top

497-372: Developing a Comparative Analysis of Compost and Mulch in the Context of Illinois Environmental Regulations

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Kramer Tree Specialists, Inc.

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Applied Mathematics, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Political Science

Description:

Illinois EPA is the Regulatory Authority charged with enforcing the Environmental Law associated with Compost. The Compost Law includes "Leaves" as an environmentally sensitive material. The IPRO sponsor, Kramer Tree Specialists, Inc., provides services to Municipalities to collect shrubbery and leaves and then processes them into Mulch. Mulch is not a regulated Environmental Product. This IPRO project aims to scientifically investigate and document the differences between Leaf Mulch and Compost. Illinois Environmental Law regulates Compost; however, the Law does not apply to Mulch.

As mentioned, and for several decades, Kramer Tree Specialists, Inc. has provided tree and shrubbery clean-up service to Municipal Governments. The trees and shrubbery are ground into mulch and sold. In recent years, Municipal Governments have added leaf clean-up services in the Fall. The Sponsor has thus added leaf clean-up services and subsequently processes the leaves with the wood they collect into a co-mingled wood/leaf mulch or pure leaf mulch. This Project will study leaf mulch, associated processes and product characteristics in order to classify leaf mulch as Mulch or Compost.

The IPRO team will study leaf mulch, associated processes and product characteristics in order to classify leaf mulch as mulch or compost. The Team objective is to investigate leaf mulch and scientifically differentiate the product and process from that of compost. The outcome of the project is a report that documents and illustrates the process of creating leaf mulch and the resulting product characteristics in comparison to the process and characteristics of compost.

The IPRO team will "shadow" sponsor employees and observe and become familiar with the Sponsor’s Wood Mulch and Leaf Mulch processes. A like activity will be completed with a Compost Operation. Students will supplement field investigation with research. Students will create a process flow diagram illustrating the processes for Mulch and Compost. Students will develop methods to measure and record such variables as oxygen, moisture, heat, Ph, material composition, bacteria, incubation time etc. in order to develop a basis for comparative analysis between leaf mulch and compost. The team will evaluate the information and identify differences and, through collaboration with the Sponsor, identify the factors that differentiate leaf mulch from compost. The team will provide progress reports and presentations as well as deliver its final report and presentation to the Sponsor. return to top

497-373: Supermarket Food Service Life Style Experience Design

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Blue Goose Market, St. Charles, Illinois

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (lewisp262@aol.com

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

An established community supermarket seeks architectural design and business planning concepts for a proposed food service life style amenity comparable to that available at Whole Foods or other contemporary grocers. The sponsor believes that adding a food service experience element will enhance the supermarket's existing business but before any decision can be made, it seeks ideas from an IPRO team to explore the full impact of such a commitment.

The IPRO team will be involved in the following types of activities during the semester: (1) conduct primary research via visits to Chicago area food stores, including Whole Foods, Mariano's and other venues in order to understand the environment of their food service life style amenity; (2) visit Blue Goose Market in St. Charles and learn first hand from the Owner and Staff their vision of the proposed food service amenity. (3) Obtain drawings of the existing building and site, as well as applicable zoning regulations and building codes for the village of St. Charles and other government entities; (4) develop a project plan; (5) conduct additional research that informs thinking about trends that affect potential for the concept and other business considerations; (6) develop renderings, scale model prototypes, and a preliminary business plan document; (6) present preliminary findings to sponsor and obtain feedback; (7) continue to develop and refine renderings, models and plans based on sponsor and other input; (8) review final work product with Sponsor; etc.return to top

497-376: Achieving Work/Life Balance in the Digital Age AND Understanding the Millenial in the Workplace

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 8:50 to 11:30 am (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Michelle Jackson (PSYC) (mijackson.05@gmail.com) and Daniel Gandara (d.a.gandara@gmail.com) (PSYC) in consultation with Mahima Saxena (PSYC)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

As of May 5, IPRO 376 is being expanded to include the topic formerly listed as IPRO 377. The descriptions for both topics, which are highly compatible with each other and have collaborating instructors, are included below:

IPRO 376 TOPIC ONE: ACHIEVING WORK/LIFE BALANCE IN THE DIGITAL AGE.

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more organizations are looking at proactive interventions and educational opportunities to aide their workforce in living healthier and less stressed lifestyles. The relationships between individual health and work stress had been demonstrated, along with how work conflict transfers to home life and vice versa. This project will bring a multi-disciplinary viewpoint to the issue of work/life balance and challenge all involved to develop new ideas and strategies to address it.

There are multiple objectives for this IPRO project. For IIT students, this IPRO will bring greater personal awareness regarding their current lifestyles, along with developing a strategy for balancing their future career and life goals. The team will develop a deeper understanding of problem solving applied to daily life beyond what is gained though the user-centered design process. For IIT, this will provide various new avenues for research in the development of work/life balance tools and training programs. This IPRO project also has the potential for providing marketable programs to serve the local business community in aiding their workforce.

This IPRO project will guide team members in learning and applying user-centered design methods. By using psychological observational research methods, e.g. surveys, focus groups, behavioral observations, and primary/secondary research, the IPRO team will advance through the analysis and synthesis process to develop outcome goals that represent avenues for interventions and education programs aimed at employees and their families. Due to the breadth of the subject, a multidisciplinary team ensures that many possible avenues will be explored. Because students will engage outside individuals for research purposes, all students will complete NIH ethics training in research protocols in order to be IRB compliant.

Industrial-Organizational (I-O) Psychology faculty member Mahima Saxena has shown interest in consulting on this IPRO. Ms. Saxena is the instructor for the Seminar in Occupational Health Psychology and has research interests in Work/Life Balance and Interventions.

IPRO 376 TOPIC TWO: UNDERSTANDING THE MILLENIAL IN THE WORKPLACE

This IPRO project will investigate several research questions affecting the Millennial generation in the workplace. (Following Generation X, the Generation Y "Millenial" population roughly spans those born in the early 1980's to the early 2000's.) This generation has been entering the workforce and leaders across industries have experience and challenges connecting with and leading this generation. Some possible research questions include:

What general attitudes do Millennials hold toward working and their careers? How do they differ compared to previous generations?

What motivates Millennials at work? What values do they hold and what do they strive for as a group?

What approaches to training does this generation prefer? Are there any differences in training methods that are more or less effective for this group?

This is only a fraction of the research questions and the full spectrum is limitless. For this summer 2014 IPRO semester, we would solely focus on motivation, goals, and training.

This course would bring several types of value to three stakeholder groups:

For IIT students, it would help them better prepare and understand the organizational influences that will affect their future careers and help them understand how to work with a very diverse set of people; beyond the multidisciplinary approach that the IPRO experience provides, this class will offer students practical insights about how to collaborate with people that hold different generational values and modes of working.

For IIT, this has the potential to produce a great amount of research and dissemination. This area of study is one of the more cutting-edge areas in I/O Psychology.

For professional industry practice, this project could yield better educational or workplace training programs. This could be in the form of seminars for leaders and executives or on-board/orientation training for new employees. Several other organizational interventions can be explored in this process as well.Approach

The main approach would be psychological research in the form of field observation. Surveys, interviews, and observations would be used to collect data for analysis. This would require IRB approval and all students would undergo NIH training to be ethically compliant.

Qualitative and quantitative research analysis tools would be used to make inferences about the data collected.

User-centered design methods from the IPRO 397 Interprofessional by Design workshop course would be learned/applied to generate potential solutions for addressing identified problems. A multidisciplinary team would be required to explore all possible solutions in order to see it come to fruition.return to top

497-378: Developing Workspace Innovation Concepts that Stimulate Cross-Functional Collaboration

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 12:10 to 2:50 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Greenlee, a Textron Company, Rockford, Illinois

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (Institute of Design) (mail@limiashunia.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

Greenlee, located in Rockford, Illinois, 90 miles northwest of Chicago, is an industry leader in professional tools for installing wire and cable. Greenlee’s Product Management and Engineering functions (approx. 40 employees) share approximately 4,200 sf of office space, where each individual employee has his/her own cubicle. The current office design is not conducive to open communication amongst team members, does not foster collaboration and has a somewhat dated appearance. Greenlee's vision is to create a work environment that provides a diverse team with more “open space” that facilitates impromptu meetings, brainstorming and improved collaboration. Greenlee's strategy is to create a more contemporary work environment that supports its efforts to grow the team through hiring college graduates and retaining employees for the long term.

The IPRO team will have the opportunity to visit Greenlee in Rockford to observe how its staff currently work in order to capture insights that might lead to innovative approaches to the workspace. The team will also investigate various contemporary workspaces and environment design strategies that support the collaborative innovation process. This groundwork will help inform the IPRO team as it brainstorms innovative possibilities that could create value for Greenlee and its employees. The IPRO team will have the opportunity to devote a significant amount of its time to mocking up concepts, obtaining feedback, and further iterative prototyping and creation of 3D visualizations that help to reimagine Greenlee's workspace. It is contemplated that at least a couple of trips to Greenlee would be made in order to gather data and present concepts.return to top

497-379: PassLok: User-Friendly Privacy Apps for the Web

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays 3:00 to 5:40 pm (Session B from June 2 to July 26)

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Applied Mathematics, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Design, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Professional & Technical Information, Psychology

Description:

Earlier this year, Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA and other agencies had engaged in warrantless, large-scale surveillance of American citizens. The need to use strong encryption in personal communications is keenly felt, but unfortunately it remains hard to use by common people. This issue relates directly to the Security theme of Armour College of Engineering and to various other IIT programs.

The plan is to develop native apps and browser extensions for PassLok, a program created by Prof. Ruiz, which implements high security cryptographic primitives on a simple user interface. By the end of the semester, these apps should be available to users.This IPRO project is expected to require one or two semesters.

The IPRO team will be organized to develop and pursue a two-pronged approach:

(1) Security apps are famously hard to use, so there will be one team constantly performing usability testing of the different prototypes, supplemented with observation of users as they go about emailing, texting, etc.

(2) The technical team or teams will take the knowledge gathered by the usability team and use it to refine and customize the user interface and the underlying operation of the program to as many as three platforms: iOS, Android and browser extensions.return to top