IPRO Current Listings for Spring 2014

IPRO 000
IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SPRING 2014
IPRO 397-100
Interprofessional by Design: Focus on Digital Service Design (For students taking their first IPRO course.)
IPRO 397-200
Interprofessional by Design: Focus on Product Design (For students taking their first IPRO course.
IPRO 397-300
Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.)
IPRO 497-01
Community Engagement Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-02
Urban Agriculture Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for the urban agriculture movement through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-03
STEM Education Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) education through collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-04
Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by developing new venture concepts through user-centered design methods and collaborative innovation.)
IPRO 497-05
Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value through "imagineering" of urban systems through multidisciplinary collaborative innovation.))
IPRO 497-304
Integration of Process Improvements
IPRO 497-307
Intermodal Container Facility Innovations for the Chicago Area
IPRO 497-313
Refuelable Electric Vehicle
IPRO 497-320
Developing an Agricultural Corridor in Bronzeville & Reformative Growing for Job Training & Development
IPRO 497-321
Site Planning for Neighborhood-Based Food & Energy Production Technologies
IPRO 497-338
Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments
IPRO 497-346
Sky
IPRO 497-351
PathPass: Opening Doors for People with Disabilities
IPRO 497-352
Applying Mobile Technology to Enhance Psychological Research on Depressive Symptoms
IPRO 497-354
Developing Sustainable Production Support Systems
IPRO 497-355
Exploring Sustainability Concepts for a Power Plant Building in the Pacific Northwest
IPRO 497-356
Techno-Business User-Application Trends Analysis of US Motor & Transformer Electricity Consumption
IPRO 497-357
Exploring Information Design & Adaptive Reuse Concepts for the Historic Rosenwald Building
IPRO 497-358
Construction Communication System: The SmartHat
IPRO 497-360
Researching & Understanding Consumer Trends & Experiences in the Home Leading to New Smart Device, Service & App Concepts that Leverage MyQ Technology
IPRO 497-361
Virtual Physical+Digital Gaming Collaboration that Bridges the Generations
IPRO 497-363
IIT Pride: Improving Student & University Community Engagement

000: IPRO OFFERING NEWS FOR SPRING 2014

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Meeting Days/Time:

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Appropriate Disciplines:

Description:

We are offering the following IPRO options for spring 2014:

(1) Three IPRO 397-xxx sections for students taking their first IPRO course, offered via once-a-week sessions on Tuesday evening, Thursday afternoon or Friday morning.

(2) Themed Cluster IPRO 497-xx sections that are organized for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme. For spring 2014, there are five themed innovation clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics.

(3) Traditional IPRO 497-3xx sections with 10 to 12 students each. There are 17 traditional IPRO sections.

IPRO sections are set up with capacity limits and limits on the number of students from the majors that are expected to be most attracted to a specific IPRO project. If you are unable to register because the section is closed or there is any other restriction, you are urged to consider other IPRO sections that interest you. You may also add yourself to the wait list for a closed IPRO section. Students who are waitlisted will be reviewed by the IPRO Program staff and instructor if there is an opportunity to add students to a given IPRO section.

Questions about choosing an IPRO project and IPRO registration can be directed to Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-100: Interprofessional by Design: Focus on Digital Service Design (For students taking their first IPRO course.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

The interprofessional teaching team includes Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Jim Braband (SSB) (braband@iit.edu), Hanna Korel (ID), Hans Mickelson and other instructors to be determned

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with the theme of digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with the theme of product design) or IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-100 GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students from a variety of disciplines are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience within a robust workshop environment -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-100 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON DIGITAL SERVICE DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing digital services. Students will work in small, interdisciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple digital service.

A service is an intangible product we experience in time through multiple touch-points and channels. According to the US department of commerce services account for 80 percent of the US GDP. However, most services are not that special or distinctive. How was the service the last time you flew? This class will focus on improving service experiences through digital technology. An example of a digital service (since we are talking about flying) is the seat selector application that allows you to pick your seats when you book a flight online. Previous to this digital service you would need to accept whatever seat was assigned to you or call and wait for an agent to help you change your seat. This digital service allows you to change your seat at the time of booking.

Digital services are delivered through a combination of apps, websites, texts, and social media. Shazam, Amazon.com, Citibank mobile banking, and Hulu are examples of digital services. We expect that your team will conceive, design conceptually, and test a simple digital service (more like an app on your phone than Amazon.com). The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

We believe that good services will:
  1. Solve for a real user need and address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Use existing, accessible data;
  3. Are intuitive for the user, i.e., you do not need to read a long manual to understand how to use it;
  4. Solve a discreet problem (confirming I have an appointment with my doctor) not a high level problem (helps me with all aspects of my health); and
  5. Do not require a major advance in coding or computer science in order to be viable.
Digital service design naturally leverages the skills of students majoring in such fields as computer science, information technology and management, professional and technical communication, psychology and business, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and web and app development are encouraged to sign up.

Interprofessional by Design is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are three section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), and IPRO 397-300 (Tuesday evening section from 6:25 to 9:05 pm). Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-200: Interprofessional by Design: Focus on Product Design (For students taking their first IPRO course.

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Jim Braband (SSB) (braband@iit.edu) and other instructors

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with a focus on digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with a focus on product design) or IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

IPRO 397-200: GENERAL OVERVIEW. Students are introduced to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO 397-200 HAS A SPECIAL FOCUS ON PRODUCT DESIGN. This course fulfills the IPRO course learning objectives through teaching a user-centered, methods driven process for designing and developing products. Students will work in small, inter-disciplinary teams to conceive and design a simple product. The final deliverables of the class are a prototype that demonstrates the benefits of the concept and preliminary business model for the idea.

Projects in this class will be student driven: it will be up to you and your team to identify a need and then develop a product that addresses that need. The final deliverable will be a prototype of your concept that demonstrates the benefits of your solution. You will also be responsible for developing a preliminary business plan for the concept. We will provide the guidance and tools for identifying and developing your product, but we have found that these projects are more successful when they are based on student interest.

We believe that good products will:
  1. Solve for a real user need / address a real market (should be attractive to an existing company, venture fund, or NGO);
  2. Have ten parts or less (this is about the level of complexity that your team will be able to prototype);
  3. Can fit through a door (this is a good way to keep the scale of the product small); and
  4. Can be prototyped with the resources and funds available to you (each team will have a $500 budget for your prototype, so you likely cannot use exotic materials).
Product design naturally leverages the skills of engineers (e.g., aerospace, biomedical, electrical, mechanical) and architects, but the class will be interesting and relevant to all disciplines. Students who are interested in design, entrepreneurship, prototyping, and product development (obviously) are encouraged to sign up.

IPRO 397-xxx is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are three section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), and IPRO 397-300 (Tuesday evening section from 6:25 to 9:05 pm). Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

397-300: Interprofessional by Design: The Classic IPRO 2.0 Option (For students taking their first IPRO course.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jeremy Alexis (ID) (alexis@id.iit.edu), Hans Mickelson and other instructors to be determined

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

“Interprofessional by Design” is an option for students taking their first IPRO project course as IPRO 397-100 (with a focus on digital service design), IPRO 397-200 (with a focus on product design) or IPRO 397-300 (the IPRO 2.0 classic option). Each section meets once each week in the Idea Shop in Suite 050 of the Technology Business Center at 3440 South Dearborn, adjacent to IIT Tower.

Interprofessional by Design introduces students to the interprofessional project concept and its underlying body of knowledge by:
  1. becoming part of a hands-on, multidisciplinary small team experience -- applying user-centered design methods guided by an interprofessional instructor team
  2. initiating and advancing project ideas through a collaborative innovation process -- exploring problem spaces that lead to insights, brainstorming, prototyping and storyboarding the user experience;
  3. developing an understanding of the context of workplace project possibilities that can create value – at the convergence of the user (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability);
  4. potentially conceiving ideas and becoming the founders of a follow-on IPRO 497 team that takes its work into the next semester; and
  5. becoming familiar with a range of prototyping modes from sketching to mockups with readily available materials to using 3D and other prototyping equipment in the Idea Shop.
IPRO projects conceived by students that became regular IPRO team projects include: Renovation of the Ramova Theatre, MORE Life, Simply Park, Language Link, Aging in Place, LegoArt, Enabling Blind Sailors to Sail Independently, Bridging the Generations via Digital+Physical Gaming, and IIT Pride: Developing Strategies for Student Engagement at Athletic Events.

Students taking the IPRO 397 course have also had the opportunity to work with various community partners on topics that innovate STEM education. This has included Shedd Aquarium (teaching modules related to ecological separation), Erikson Institute (K-3 math education), Chicago Conservation Corps at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (sustainability projects for Chicago Public Schools and other organizations), and Adler Planetarium (brainstorming payload ideas for the Far Horizons balloon launch).

IPRO 397-xxx is only open to students taking their first IPRO course. There are three section options: IPRO 397-100 (Thursday afternoon section from 1:50 to 4:30), IPRO 397-200 (Friday section from 10:00 to 12:40), and IPRO 397-300 (Tuesday evening section from 6:25 to 9:05 pm). Questions may be addressed to Jeremy Alexis (alexis@id.iit.edu), IPRO Program Director or Rima Kuprys, IPRO Program Coordinator (rkuprys@iit.edu).return to top

497-01: Community Engagement Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for community engagement through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Joseph Clair (ARCH) (joseph@josephclair.com) and Steve Beck (CAEE) (sbeck.creo@gmail.com) in collaboration with William Briggs (CAEE) (wbriggs@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 30 to 70 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2014, there are four themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, Urban Agriculture, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners, and may be expanded to include additional topics by the time the spring semester begins.

The Community Engagement Innovation Cluster may include the following topics that will have traditional IPRO teams on the order of 10 students from multiple disciplines organized to address them:

IPRO 497-01A COMMUNITY ENERGY ON AN URBAN NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE. Urban communities spend significant capital purchasing energy and resources from outside their boundaries, and then send the waste products downstream to other communities. Concurrently, many communities struggle with economic development, trying to keep scarce retail alive. Coupled with a loss of community among residents, this cycle creates instability that further threatens the long-term prospects for the area. One path to reverse this cycle is to focus community resources on local, community energy/water/material systems. When neighbors have to share energy systems that they cooperatively maintain – preferably through local businesses, they shift economic resources from a community drain to a community strength. If this can be solved on the neighborhood level for an urban community, the repercussions are tremendous. The goal of this IPRO project team within the Community Innovation Cluster is to review the infrastructure and flows of energy and water in a typical Chicago neighborhood, and develop a plan to implement community energy programs that decrease the amount of financial resources that leave the community while developing ideas for community businesses that will support the community energy initiative. This will be accomplished by (a) documenting the current infrastructure and model current use patterns, (b) identifying the long-term and short-term financial impact of the current patterns of use, and (c) reviewing and cataloging the energy supply/efficiency tools that could be applied to any community, noting cost, efficacy, scale, and benefit. The team can advance previous work or develop new work based upon their desire for impact.

IPRO 497-01B COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT (BRONZEVILLE). Neighborhoods need to continually rethink their approach to economic development and community development, taking into account many factors that influence the interaction between and among government, businesses and residents. This continuing IPRO project will leverage all of the insight and tools used in the previous semesters, as well as current tools used by other entities in the neighborhood, and apply them to solve community-scale problems in the Bronzeville community. Working with local leaders, the Special Services Agency, IIT Office of Community Affairs, businesses, and residents the team will lead a workshop to gain information from community leaders on Bronzeville's opportunities, identify a current issue in the community that needs addressing, and develop then execute a plan to solve the problem. To accomplish this goal, the team will engage in the following types of activities and tasks: (a) community visits to engage in conversations with members; (b) contact all units of government active in the community for input and data; (c) synthesize information from the community and local government; (d) use, or where necessary, develop tools to analyze data; (e) create multiple solution paths and present them to the community for feedback; and (e) where time permits, implement the solution based upon the feedback from the community. This team can build on the work of previous teams or start anew, and it is expected that it will also create a strong legacy for continuing such work in future semesters.

IPRO 497-03C OPEN SOURCE CONSTRUCTION. A number of developing communities face a myriad of harsh realities including joblessness, health and safety risks, and sub-standard housing. In many cases an assisted "First Step" in the right direction will help to alleviate some of these afflictions within the given community. We want to be able to provide this "First Step." During this phase of our project - Open Source Construction - we plan to achieve this by creating a guide that will teach the knowledge and skills required to generate a prolific, safe and sustainable construction and improvement method for building within these developing communities. Furthermore, this guide will include instructions in pictures, as well as multiple languages, so that people from different cultures and backgrounds will be able to understand and use the materials in a seamless fashion. The goals of this team is to put forth a business plan, deliver micro-workshops, maintain and extend on-line presence and expand content. The team will accomplish this by: (a) evaluating the guide to assure that it is successfully producing safe, sustainable housing in developing communities; (b) raising funds for research and guide evaluation and expansion; (c) choosing additional locations to launch the guide; (d) conducting first-hand guide evaluation at the specific locations; (e) expanding and installing an effective leadership structure; (f) conducting beta testing, revision and roll-out; and (g) expanding relationships with collaborating groups such as WorldServe, Engineers Without Borders and RISE International.

IPRO 497-01D SOCIAL INNOVATION WORKSHOP FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. Social Innovation is the act of developing new ideas -- whether concepts, products or services -- that positively serve to impact pressing global needs. These are issues that cut across the boundaries of the state, the market and the household. As a result, the classic tools of government policy on the one hand, and market solutions on the other, have proven inadequate. As such, over the last 40 years, this gap has prompted the growth of new social ventures, and in particular those that impact the developing world. These ventures, whether grown from a single idea or as a result of long-term service initiatives now span across both public and private markets. They remain distinct in that their production is driven by social values as a primary imperative rather than private financial appropriation. The goal of this project is to establish an on-going Social Innovation Workshop IPRO platform that can leverage our multidisciplinary talent and creativity to impact some of the world’s most difficult problems: increasing access to energy, increasing transport efficiencies, improving agricultural techniques, providing appropriate and sustainable solutions for clean water, safer housing, waste management and chronic disease. Members of the IPRO team will gain experience in hypotheses development, product development, business & market planning, field context development, program implementation, performance management & impact evaluation. This experience will prove invaluable as the student enters the dynamics of an economy that has profound implications for the future of public services as well as for the daily life of citizens.

IPRO 497-01E THE PRINCETON PARK COLLABORATIVE. The Princeton Park Collaborative serves to identify and address the needs of the nearby Princeton Park neighborhood at 95th and the Dan Ryan. As part of the larger Roseland community, Princeton Park is named for a 1944 development that replaced farm land with a park surrounded by houses. Critical relationships have been established, with various neighborhood organizations that allow unfettered contact with real stakeholders (community leaders, residents, and business owners). Teams are tasked with meeting these stakeholders, identifying their needs, responding to those needs, and presenting the team’s results to them. Princeton Park is a five-block by seven-block Chicago neighborhood that remains extremely walk-friendly and borders the 95th street stop of the CTA Red Line. The CTA stop allows the bulk of the neighborhood to be considered transit-oriented which provides unique development opportunities that other neighborhoods do not. Another unique amenity is a pedestrian bridge connecting school children to their elementary school east of the Dan Ryan. Previous projects undertaken through IPRO teams under the concept of a Princeton Park Collaborative have included the adaptive reuse of a previous church into a community center and the design of a 70-unit assisted senior living facility. The community center board is currently using the information provided by the IPRO teams in their search for funding. The work of the teams has included the development of needed programs; code and zoning analysis; construction and operating budgets; as well as schematic architectural and systems design. Through the work of IPRO teams, the Princeton Park Collaborative is destined to leave a long-lasting impact on this community interested in maintaining its identity and providing for its residents.return to top

497-02: Urban Agriculture Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value for the urban agriculture movement through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Thursdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Rodger Cooley (jrojet@yahoo.com) in consultation with Armand Paradis (IIT Institute for Food Safety & Health) (aparadi2@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 30 to 70 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2014, there are five themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, Urban Agriculture, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be expanded to include new topics by the time the spring semester begins.

The Urban Agriculture Innovation Cluster includes the following topics that will have traditional IPRO teams on the order of 10 students from multiple disciplines organized to address them. Students should note the Urban Agriculture Innovation Cluster topics either have community sponsors or are ongoing projects with already determined goals and objectives. Students will get exposure to the full range of urban agriculture issues including composting, community development, urban planning, storm water, marketing, communications, raising livestock (fish and worms), designing and building structures to hands on farming (seeding, watering, weeding and harvesting).

The health and well being of individuals, communities and environments in the United States are challenged and compromised by the dominant industrial food system. Obesity, diabetes and other diet related diseases, waste of organic nutrients, massive water pollution, and excessive green houses gasses are linked to how food is produced, harvested, distributed, processed, marketed, prepared and consumed. The vast majority of fresh produce travels over 1200 miles to get to Chicago. Produce is harvested early before it is at peak ripeness, processed at multiple steps and retailed 7-10 days after picking. This leads to a loss of nutritional value and taste all along the chain before it consumed. Because of the standardization of fruit and vegetable production, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization calculated 75% of crop diversity has been lost since 1900. A loss of diversity and genetics never researched for qualities such as disease and pest resistance, drought tolerance, and nutritional benefits. There are many other urban and market trends and motivating factors that have stimulated the urban agriculture movement.

Since its inception in the fall of 2011 as IPRO 314, U Farm IIT has been adding elements and partners to address the problems of the dominant food system using the opportunities provided by urban agriculture. Similar projects at other universities have started at a similar basic level and grew over time to become robust programs providing diverse educational opportunities and career pathways for students; incorporating many departments through research, curriculum, and projects; generating revenue through sales, grants and donations; providing access to healthy produce for local communities; and positive attention and differentiation for the universities.

Goals for Spring 2014 consist of: (1) Long term planning of urban agriculture initiatives at IIT including development of indoors aquaponic facility and developing an implementation plan for a new urban farm along S State St between 29th and 30th Streets; (2) Extend HACCP (Hazardous Analysis Critical Control Point) training plan for soil and compost testing in coordination with IIT's Institute for Food Safety & Health (IFSH) faculty and students; (3) Expand community outreach and connections; and (4) Continue gaining expertise in production and marketing of produce on the U Farm IIT site.

The above topics will merit the organization within the Urban Agriculture Cluster of different types and sizes of multidisciplinary teams. In addition, other concepts may be developed by the time the spring semester begins that warrant attention by IPRO teams within the cluster as well. As these additional concepts are defined, they will be added to this description.return to top

497-03: STEM Education Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by advancing Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) education through collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Motorola Solutions Foundation

Faculty:

Daniel Gandara (PSYC) (d.a.gandara@gmail.com) with Susan Camasta (SAT) (camasus@hawk.iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 30 to 70 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2014, there are five themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, Urban Agriculture Innovation, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster are created in collaboration with community partners and other organizations, and may be expanded to include new topics by the time the spring semester begins.

The STEM Education Innovation Cluster may include the following continuing topics that will have traditional IPRO teams on the order of 10 students from multiple disciplines organized to address them and/or there may be new topics that are incorporated in the STEM cluster:
  1. IPRO 497-03A Developing Teaching Modules for Journey World (Girl Scouts of Greater Chicago and Northwest Indiana)
  2. IPRO 497-03B Developing Teaching Modules on Ecological Separation (Shedd Aquarium)
  3. IPRO 497-03C Developing K-3 Teaching Modules on Human-Made World (Erikson Institute)
  4. IPRO 497-03D Creating and Prototyping Concepts for a Meteor Strike Exhibit (Adler Planetarium)
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497-04: Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value by developing new venture concepts through user-centered design methods and collaborative innovation.)

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Amanda Geppert (ID) (ageppert@hawk.iit.edu) in consultation with Zachary Paradis (ID) (parazac@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 30 to 70 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2014, there are five themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, Urban Agriculture Innovation, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation, and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster include those proposed by faculty members, and may be expanded to include other related topics by the time the spring semester begins.

Specifically related to the Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation Cluster, IIT students currently have a variety of individual entry points across the university for exploring their ideas, obtaining support and even forming a team to further develop their concepts. There are four critical elements that can inspire collaborative innovation and new venture development in a multidisciplinary team setting to create value: (1) Provide students with much more concentrated and sustained advising and critique from faculty and graduate student teams with complementary expertise in business, design, technology and law; (2) Inspire and encourage new venture concepts in dynamic, multi-team workshop environments that cultivate interaction, serendipitous connections, breakthrough thinking, and a touch of competitive spirit; (3) Facilitate multidisciplinary interaction in a collaborative space with resources that enable progression through phases of design thinking as well as multiple levels of prototyping refinement, from foam board and duct tape to 3D modeling and printing; (4) Promote the user-centered design thinking process as a powerful toolkit for stimulating innovation and guiding inquiry through progressive and iterative phases.

This themed IPRO cluster will be comprised of up to 70 students organized in small, agile multidisciplinary teams. An important foundation for this cluster is the application of user-centered design methods, with an overarching balance of attention to user desirability, technical feasibility and business viability. Teams that are formed will be guided through the innovation process that begins with problem/opportunity definition and research, emphasizes ethnographic research, identifies driving insights, inspires brainstorming and promotes iterative prototyping with user feedback.

Students who participate in this themed cluster will be relentless and tenacious in properly framing possibilities, methodical and self-disciplined in developing valid and reliable data and insights, and creative and opportunistic in recognizing and capitalizing on driving insights.return to top

497-05: Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems (A multi-IPRO themed cluster that creates value through "imagineering" of urban systems through multidisciplinary collaborative innovation.))

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (ID) (mail@limiashunia.com) and Roberto Cammino (MMAE) (cammino@iit.edu) in collaboration with Bonnie Haferkamp (BME), Fouad Teymour (ChBE), Jamshid Mohammadi (CAEE), Paul Anderson (CAEE) and Eric Brey (BME)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

The IPRO themed cluster is offered for students to choose a broad theme but leave their options open regarding a specific team topic under the theme. We will accommodate from 30 to 70 students in a multi-IPRO themed cluster. These themed clusters are set up for registration much like an architecture studio, wherein a broad theme is identified, with choices of various specific team topics under the theme.

For spring 2014, there are five themed clusters of multiple IPRO team project topics in Community Engagement Innovation, Urban Agriculture Innovation, STEM Education Innovation, Entrepreneurship & New Ventures Innovation, and Innovative Solutions to Urban Problems. The team topics within a themed cluster include those proposed by faculty members, and may be expanded to include other related topics by the time the spring semester begins.

This IPRO themed cluster focused to innovative solutions to urban problems examines urban systems and is led by several Engineering Faculty members. This spring 2014 pilot cluster will lead to multiple themed clusters each semester focused to our engineering themes, i.e., water, health, energy, security. This spring 2014 cluster will generally be focused to energy and sustainability. Cities function because of (or in spite of) urban systems, which can be loosely defined as any collection of independent parts that work together to make cities work better (or not). Examples of such systems include those that provide energy, communications, education, healthcare, water supply, solid waste management, recreation, and transportation. Above and beyond conventional repair, urban systems need redesign to move forward toward the intelligent, integrated systems that will make future cities work.

Students in this multi-team IPRO cluster will examine the challenges posed by urban systems, propose creative solutions to those challenges, and then form innovation teams focused on the research and development of prototype solutions. We anticipate there will be four independent teams created within the cluster focused to individual projects that they wish to pursue.

In addition to increasing awareness and understanding of urban problems and using innovative multidisciplinary approaches to address these problems, students in this IPRO section will learn and develop skills related to team dynamics, project management, economic analysis, and life-cycle assessment --- all in the context of applying discipline-specific fundamental knowledge and problem solving methods.return to top

497-304: Integration of Process Improvements

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

A.Finkl & Sons

Faculty:

Sheldon Mostovoy (MMAE) (mostovoy@iit.edu) and William Maurer (INTM) (maurer@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Business, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Science & Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics

Description:

The Spring 2014 IPRO 304 team will engage in tasks similar to the previous semester as outlined below. This would involve conceptual design, testing and data collection to validate the solutions under varying production conditions and environments.

The milling process is the final step of manufacturing forged steel products. During this process, cutting inserts occasionally break causing an uneven surface finish. This process variability requires an operator to remain at the milling machine full time even though only 10 to 20 percent of the operator’s time is occupied. The labor cost together with periodic milling rework creates lost capacity and broken inserts conservatively costs the sponsor in excess of $500K annually. This is an industry wide issue.

Previous approaches to resolving the remote detection of broken cutting inserts included the use of microphones, heat sensors, accelerometers, laser scanners, and reflective phosphors on each of the cutting inserts. Many approaches provided good results in the lab but were not sufficiently reliable when operating under full-scale production conditions at the sponsor’s facilities.

The Spring 2013 IPRO 304 team focused on two methods to remotely detect broken inserts: (1) use of a power meter to detect a surge in power when an insert is broken; and (2) application of RFID technology meter to detect when an insert is broken. Both approaches have been approved by Finkl management as a viable means for continued evaluation. The Fall 2013 IPRO team has been focusing on development of the first approach.

The IPRO team spent considerable time at the sponsor’s production facility to learn how the present system works, observe its shortcomings and develop improvement ideas. They are also analyzed the requirements and developing a prototype system for each of the two approaches. The prototype systems were tested using the laboratory scale milling machine at IIT. return to top

497-307: Intermodal Container Facility Innovations for the Chicago Area

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Mi-Jack

Faculty:

Laurence Rohter (CAEE) (rohter@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architecture, Business Administration, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

Intermodal Freight is the transfer of Containers and Trailers from Rail to Truck and from Truck to Rail. Chicago is the most important railroad center in North America. More lines of track radiate in more directions from Chicago than from any other city, and encompassing six of the seven major railroads with important operations.

Intermodal is one of the largest economic engines in the Chicago Area. There are new situations affecting this transportation hub, including: (1) Shifts in Global Logistics that include (a) Reshoring (more and more domestic containers shuttling goods around the U.S), (b) Box Car Curtailments (moving goods previously shipped by box car to containers, double stacked, and trailers on flat cars), (c) Panama Canal Expansion nearly on-line, and (d) Chinese purchase of franchise for a Nicaragua cross-Isthmus canal; (2) Better Thermal Controls of Shipments; and (3) Tighter Management Tools.

Based on the above industry trends, the objectives of this IPRO project will focus on three inter-related areas: (1) Logistics Revisions to examine the course of expected/envisioned changes in World-wide, National and Regional supply chains; (2) Continuation of thermal model development specific to the environment of transport containers, not too dissimilar to small buildings; and (3) The use of the strongest modeling tools available for event type simulations and 3-D visualizations.

In order to achieve the above objectives, the IPRO team will undertake several tasks in parallel: (1) Conduct a thorough review of the situational picture relative to anticipating changes in Intermodal technologies and demand; (2) Enhance work and models previously developed for enroute thermal prediction and packaging with additional testing and protocol development; and (3) Incorporate several new leading edge tools to provide better intermodal yard planning and operations. The latter includes the learning and application of (a) Arena simulation software by Rockwell Automation that helps to demonstrate, predict, and measure system strategies for effective, efficient and optimized performance; and (b) Unity 3D -- a universal tool for architectural visualizations, interactive media installations, and video game development. return to top

497-313: Refuelable Electric Vehicle

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays/Wednesdays from 3:15 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Francisco Ruiz (MMAE) (ruiz@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Business Administration, Business Administration & Applied Science, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Entrepreneurship, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism of Technology, Science & Business, Materials Science & Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

NOTE: Offering this IPRO topic is subject to final approval by the dean of Armour College of Engineering.

Electric cars are very clean and efficient, but suffer from lack of range and long recharging time. People would use electric cars a lot more if it were possible to recharge a car in less than ten minutes, and do so repeatedly without fear of wrecking the battery. Our approach is to install a "refuelable" zinc-air battery in a vehicle, and demonstrate the concept in a record-breaking long distance road trip.

This project has been going on for a number of semesters. Progress has been slow, but steady. For Spring 2014 the main objectives are: (1) Decide on the approach for oxidized zinc storage and design the appropriate components that will be fabricated over the summer; (2) Finalize the fuel cell design and build a full-scale cell to power the vehicle; and (3) Start a massive fundraising campaign to support the upcoming road demonstration.

The team will be organized in sub-teams of four people, each tasked with a small part of the project. Weekly meetings will coordinate the effort between sub-teams, while other weekly meetings will concentrate on the tasks within each sub-team. This project is quite mature, but there is still room for coming up with new ideas as the main concepts are implemented in practice.return to top

497-320: Developing an Agricultural Corridor in Bronzeville & Reformative Growing for Job Training & Development

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Bronzeville Urban Development (B.U.D.) and Department of Reentry and Diversion Programs, Thomas J. Dart Cook County Sheriff

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu) with the support of Larry Dorn, Ph.D. candidate, Civil & Architectural Engineering

Appropriate Disciplines:

Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business Administration, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

This IPRO team will be organized to address two topics that are important to Chicago communities. One is in collaboration with Bronzeville Urban Development and is focused to developing an agricultural corridor in Bronzeville. The second is in collaboration with the Cook County Office of Sheriff and is focused to developing green house design/build concepts for job training and development. Both projects are continuations of work by fall 2013 IPRO teams.

DEVELOPING AN AGRICULTURAL CORRIDOR IN BRONZEVILLE

Bronzeville is a developing community adjacent to IIT and serves as a bridge between the campuses of IIT and the University of Chicago. It is a community with challenges that include pockets of poverty, aging infrastructure and vacant lots following years of neglect. This project taps unused community assets (abandoned railroad line, electrical substation, several city-owned vacant lots) to develop an urban food-raising core in the neighborhood. This core will turn a liability of the community into a strength and will provide food in a food desert, provide employment and develop a distinctive community and cultural asset in Bronzeville.

Bronzeville Urban Development (B.U.D.), is a not-for-profit organization serving the Bronzeville area. Bronzeville Urban Development is currently in the process of redeveloping the old Stockyards railroad, running along 40th Street from State Street to Lake Park, as an urban, food production corridor. Previous IPROs have planned and mapped the uses for the embankment and recommended ways to develop it with greenhouse and aquaponics facilities. The organization is now in a position to begin implementing the work of previous IPROs through this spring 2014 IPRO team that will work with B.U.D. to further refine and begin to implement the master plan.

B.U.D. has identified a site for beginning the redevelopment process. This site, the Alpha Site, includes the majority of ground level, city-owned vacant lots and the largest of the eight embankments. The objective of the spring IPRO will be to do a physical survey of the Alpha Site, and develop a detailed plan for redeveloping it.

While most of the project is planned for the land on top of the embankments, there are several dozen lots that are at ground level. B.U.D. would like to develop these as garden sites. These could be put into productive use as soon as the summer of 2014.

There may also be an opportunity for students to work with B.U.D. to plan the redevelopment of the abandoned CTA Station on the site. Subject to the results of an environmental survey, the IPRO team will work with the B.U.D. staff to plan for the station's redevelopment as a permanent home for B.U.D. and provide access to the top of the embankment for future redevelopment.

REFORMATIVE GROWING FOR JOB TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT

Cook County Jail is unique in that it is one of the few jails in the country that has reinstituted job training and other types of programs that will allow inmates to be better prepared for employment once they leave the jail. The gardening program is one of the most successful programs that the Sheriff’s Department operates. They would like to be able to utilize the program year round. This IPRO will make that possible.

The Cook County Sheriff’s office has developed a garden program in their Youth Diversion Boot Camp. This garden is on the grounds of the Cook County Jail and is tended by inmates. Currently it is only a seasonal garden. The Sheriff’s Office would like to make the project a year-round program by erecting greenhouse and heating the greenhouse with solar collectors. They would also like to incorporate some aquaculture and microgreen raising into the facility. This IPRO will work with the Sheriff’s office to design and construct a series of inexpensive greenhouses on the grounds of the jail. Students will design the solar heating and agricultural systems for use in the greenhouses, and prepare training manuals and aids to instruct staff on how to build and manage the systems.

The goal of this IPRO project is to develop year round greenhouses on the site that will allow the Garden Program to operate year round. This will be accomplished by building on the design concepts from the fall 2013 IPRO team through the following tasks and activities that the IPRO team will have the opportunity to prioritize and integrate any new thinking: (1) The design and operation of the Hydroponic pools system (including plumbing configuration, pumps and water supply considerations); (2) The design and operation of the solar heating system (including water circulation system and consideration of rates of flow, water temperature control and make-up water rate; (3) The formulation of a materials and parts list; (4) The formulation of an assembly and installation manual; and (5) The design of the electrical system to support the entire Hoop House project.return to top

497-321: Site Planning for Neighborhood-Based Food & Energy Production Technologies

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Blacks in Green

Faculty:

Blake Davis (INTM) (davisbl@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business Administration, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

In September 2010, the City of Chicago passed an Urban Agriculture Ordinance. This ordinance specifically permitted urban farming in the city for the first time in 100 years, and clarified the permissible zoning for both urban farms and community gardens.

Most of the vacant Chicago lots have previously been occupied by residential or commercial buildings. At some point, these buildings were demolished and the lots became vacant. Often, a building was knocked down into the basement and the debris was covered by a thin layer of subsoil from some another construction site. Usually the site contains much of the concrete from the foundations of the previous buildings. In no way were the sites prepared for use as gardens/farms. Subsequently, trash was often dumped on the site, cars were parked on the lots, and the subsoil was compacted so that many of the vacant lots cannot even grow weeds at the present time. On the order of 70 to 80 thousand of these lots are owned by the City of Chicago.

Blacks in Green is a Chicago-based, environmental organization. BIG has developed several national models for environmental education and green-village-building based on sustainability principles embodied in the concept of Grannynomics. Part of Blacks in Green’s eight Principles of Green-Village-Building is to work to make each community more self-sufficient in both food and energy.

The purpose of this IPRO project is to work with Blacks in Green to develop a set of technologies that can be used in the West Woodlawn neighborhood to operationalize the eight Principles. West Woodlawn is a low income community on the south side of Chicago, just south and west of the University of Chicago. Residents of the community already suffer high levels of poverty, and are ill-equipped to absorb increases in the costs of food and energy. The set of technologies that is envisioned includes a wide range of neighborhood-based technologies for growing food and biomass for energy. Other secondary technologies, such as food preservation and super-insulation, must also be considered as ways to more effectively use the primary food and energy raising technologies.

Many technologies have been developed to make communities more self-reliant in food and energy. Most of these are applicable mainly to rural and suburban areas. Some popular books have attempted to apply the simplest of these technologies to urban areas. However, to our knowledge, no systematic inquiry of how to apply these on the scale of an urban neighborhood has been attempted, at least not in the last 30 years!

The IPRO team will work with Blacks in Green to:
  1. Develop a methodology to determine what is, or might be, in the soil under the vacant lot. [This would include examining historical maps and references and doing soil testing and analysis.]
  2. Determine how to best develop the lot to eliminate hazards and improve plant growth. [This might be accomplished by sub-soiling the lots to improve drainage; removing large blocks of concrete and debris; adding compost to improve soil nutrition or even building raised beds on top of soil that is too contaminated to plant in.]
  3. Design a system for preparing excavating and developing the soil and then recovering these costs from future users of the land.
  4. Evaluate the feasibility of applying the neighborhood-based technologies identified by the Fall 2013 IPRO team to the lots available to B.I.G. in West Woodlawn.
The overall goal is to develop a bundle of low cost, neighborhood-based technologies that can be used in the West Woodlawn neighborhoods and other similar communities in Chicago to empower them to become more self-sufficient, and allow them to make better use of under-utilized community resources.return to top

497-338: Developing Insights that Support Energy Efficiency Improvement Strategies for Varied Built Environments

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 6:25 to 9:05 pm

Sponsor:

Electrical Contractors' Association of City of Chicago (ECA)

Faculty:

Dan Tomal (INTM) (drtomal@aol.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business Administration, Business Administration & Applied Science, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

There are many old, energy inefficient, poorly environmentally-designed buildings that consume considerable energy and are thus costly to operate and have the potential to become more energy efficient. However, due to their age, architectural design, and high-density urban location, it is a challenge to develop cost-effective solutions to improve their energy efficiency.

The challenge of this IPRO project is to identify the root causes of the energy inefficiencies in collaboration with stakeholders (building owners, building management, and sponsor) associated with a specific building/site. This involves developing an understanding of the myriad building constraints, e.g., historic sites that can't be altered, city codes, building structure design and integrity, current uses and operation of the building, etc. In previous semesters, IPRO teams have focused on Crown Hall, Soldier Field and the Biograph Theater.

The objective of the IPRO team is to conduct an energy audit of a selected building, working with the the stakeholders, building operations management, as well as the ECA and NECA national competition criteria to 1) identify energy inefficiencies and 2) propose creative, environmentally conscious, and viable, creative energy solutions to addressing energy inefficiencies that are not readily apparent without proper analysis.

The approach will require collaboration of students from a variety of disciplines as listed above in order to conduct thorough energy analyses of the building and investigate smart technologies(s) as options for creating sustainable and economical solutions. The team will also benefit from consultation with the IIT Smart Grid program, including Dr. Mohammad Shahidehpour, director of the Center for Electricity Innovation, as well as various ECA member firms such as Gibson, Schneider Electric and Gurtz Electric.return to top

497-346: Sky

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:25 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

John Manaves (ARCH) (jmanaves@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business Administration, Business Administration & Applied Science, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Psychology

Description:

With over a quarter of a million people flying in the air between ground and space at any given moment, this IPRO continuing project will challenge this mode of temporary existence, researching and developing aerial architecture.

The IPRO team will retrace the technological evolution of aviation and the impact on the designed world rethinking current technologies within architecture and design. In 1891 Alexander Graham Bell began to experiment with the idea of creating heavier than air structures. In this new world the Wright Brother’s winged aviation model of flight is trumped by Alexander Graham Bell’s visions. The emphasis of an elevated ground is explored. A new aerial fiction is produced by hybridizing techniques found in modern aviation with the past. Within this context emerging technologies will be developed and explored. In an attempt to challenge the city, a temporary inhabitable flying platform will be designed and prototyped. The plan is to design a platform that can fly above the tallest towers in the world rethinking the basic principle of the city skyline, the skyscraper.

The project will progress through three phases:

Phase 01 Precedents & Types -- Encompasses research, analysis and documentation of iconic works of architecture that are categorized as aerial projects to better understand historical precedents and how they relate to course interests. A comprehensive categorization and documentation will be created.

Phase 02 Up-Skilling (Overlapping Phase 01) -- Emerging technologies within the field of architecture will be explored and learned. The hacking and reuse of these technologies will assist in the development of phase 03. Software and hardware will be explored, including advanced fabrication techniques.

Phase 03 Aerial Vision & Prototyping -- Prototypes of new proposed structures will be developed using various IIT resources. A team will be developed to explore and test both physical and digital models. return to top

497-351: PathPass: Opening Doors for People with Disabilities

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm.

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Kevin Meade (MMAE) (meade@iit.edu) in collaboration with Mardy Chizek, RN, FNP, BSN, MBA, AAS, Chizek Consulting, Inc, Charism® Eldercare Services

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business Administration, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Psychology,

Description:

This project is based on work undertaken by a team of students in IPRO 397 during the Fall 2013 semester, namely Marta Baran,Nick Barcenas, Ashot Gabrielyan, Anthony Thurston and Yanfeng Wang.

Injured students and others must deal with the difficulties of getting around between classes -- going through and opening doors. Automatic buttons do not solve all of the issues of entering or leaving a building independently.

What if the door opened for them? PathPass is a sensor mechanism that an injured or disabled person can use to open doors automatically and avoid issues related to reaching and pushing the button and having a door close prematurely. It works by attaching the device to your crutches or wheelchair. A companion device is installed in a door so that it will respond and open as you approach it.

The purpose of this IPRO project is to further research, prototype, test and develop viable solutions. This will involve understanding the elements of a balanced breakthrough methodology, namely, considering technical feasibility, user desirability and business viability.

In the meantime, questions and expressions of interest may be directed to Professor Kevin Meade (meade@iit.edu), Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu or 312.567.3986) or Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu or 312.567.3448).return to top

497-352: Applying Mobile Technology to Enhance Psychological Research on Depressive Symptoms

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 1:50 to 3:05 pm

Sponsor:

In collaboration with dscout.com

Faculty:

Michael Young (PSYC) (youngm@iit.edu) and Katherine Meyers, M.S. (PSYC) (katherineburg@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Applied Mathematics, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Business Administration, Business Administration & Applied Science, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Math & Science Education, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Physics, Psychology

Description:

Much of the psychological research aimed at understanding and treating mood disorders such as depression uses retrospective self-report, which involves asking participants questions on their thoughts, emotions, or experiences in the recent or distant past. Research subjects are often taken out of their own, natural environment, usually at a single time point, and the data generated from these studies are largely influenced by the participants insight and memory. Previous research has shown that although both researchers and clinicians rely heavily on participant self-report, retrospective descriptions of past experiences display various inaccuracies. Studies with normal individuals have demonstrated that in retrospect, people consistently exaggerate both their positive and negative emotional experiences. These factors have muddled much of the current literature on psychological disorders, including seasonal depression. This is problematic for the field's conceptualization and treatment of depression and other psychological disorders.

However, recently developed mobile and web-based technology has allowed for researchers to examine psychological phenomena without removing a participant from the real world. This reduces the artificiality of the study environment, as well as the dependency on participant memory and insight. Additionally, using cell phone or computer technology increases the ease in which data are collected, and researchers can now easily ask participants a variety of questions throughout the day, for as long as necessary. This has the potential to substantially enhance the quality and reliability of the data. In addition, because data are collected at many time points, the effect of a persons state at one time on subsequent short-term and long-term future points can be studied. Furthermore, most recent use of these technologies allows multiple interventions to be built in throughout a week and their short-term and long-term outcomes assessed. These new methods, however, have not yet been applied to develop a greater understanding of seasonal depression. Using new mobile technology, this is the first study of its kind to help psychologists develop a greater understanding of which psychological variables maintain or worsen seasonal depressive symptoms in the fall and wintertime. This study will have important implications for the conceptualization and treatment of seasonal depression.

This is the second phase of a two-semester project. The purpose of the spring 2014 semester IPRO 352 project is to design and run the latter stages of the study, integrating standard research methods in psychology with advanced mobile technology.

The goals consist of: (1) Working collaboratively with faculty to become versed in modern research technology and methodologies, as well as timely, relevant psychological research; (2) Integrating expertise and experience from both the students and researchers, to brainstorm study implementation approaches for this phase of the study; (3) Continue the interaction with and recruiting of research participants from the community through advertisements, outreach, screening and consenting of new research participants, and follow-up with participants as needed; (4) Troubleshooting and resolving any remaining technical issues; (5) Cleaning and structuring data, which involves becoming familiar with statistical software and data entry; and (6) Running statistical analyses as needed.

We plan to address the aforementioned challenges through a collaborative approach to problem solving. Once the team is up-to-date on the current literature, a think-tank like environment will be cultivated wherein team members and faculty will work together to identify and prioritize issues and brainstorm possible solutions. A diverse range of students is welcome in order to benefit from different expertise and professional perspectives.

The initial stages of the project will involve some didactic training, wherein the faculty and experienced students will share knowledge of the project, research methodology, and psychology constructs. All team members will be participate in Institutional Review Board (IRB) training, and a member of the IIT IRB will come to discuss relevant ethical issues. Students will then be organized in sub-teams based on their interests and areas of expertise. Students will be able to take turns in leadership roles in order to cultivate both team membership as well as leadership skills. Multiple times throughout the semester, teams will present to the rest of the class, which will encourage the development of effective communication and presentation skills and will enable students working in other areas to think critically about the project as a whole and make suggests to other sub-teams. Students will also be able to assist in examining the study hypotheses based on the outcome data, which will cultivate logically correct reasoning skills. return to top

497-354: Developing Sustainable Production Support Systems

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Meeting Days/Time:

Wednesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Quam Nichols Company

Faculty:

William Maurer (INTM) (maurer@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Business Administration, Business Administration & Applied Science, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Biochemistry & Biophysics, Physics

Description:



Quam Nichols Company was established in 1930 on the south side of Chicago where it still operates today. In the early years, much of the manufacturing of "store-bought" radios was done in the Midwest and Quam Nichols was the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) for the speakers found in most of the brand name radios of the time, and then televisions and other consumer electronics after that. Today, Quam continues to design and manufacture a wide scope of loudspeaker and installation solutions for the changing installed sound industry. If the project involves signaling, sound masking, voice or music, look to Quam as your "problem solver." (http://quamspeakers.com)

Quam Nichols aims to further enhance the level of manufacturing responsiveness to support the needs of its customers. Improved responsiveness is critical to maintaining a competitive advantage. Presently, the Quam offers the IPRO team the challenge of assessing current production practices and investigating improvement options that could achieve reduced lead times and increased productivity.

The Spring 2014 Quam Nichols IPRO team will focus on the challenge of understanding current production operations and establishing metrics and a baseline with which to gauge the effectiveness of a new work cell solution. The team will focus on researching viable work cell options, and designing and developing a plan for implementing a work cell solution that accommodates custom orders and shorter production times, as well as improves production efficiency.

The IPRO team will devote a significant amount of its time to observing operations and recording data at the sponsor’s facility. The remainder of the time will be spent researching and developing candidate solution pathways. The team will also meet periodically with Quam Nichols management to provide updates on their progress and obtain feedback.return to top

497-355: Exploring Sustainability Concepts for a Power Plant Building in the Pacific Northwest

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5:00 to 6:15 pm

Sponsor:

Sargent & Lundy LLC

Faculty:

Nancy Hamill-Governale (ARCH) (hamill@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business Administration, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

This IPRO project will explore the application of sustainable building design methods to modern Natural Gas power plant design, focusing on the building structures and related systems not the power production process. This project will be undertaken in collaboration with Sargent & Lundy LLC as they develop plans for a power plant to be built in the Pacific Northwest.

The IPRO team will explore opportunities to introduce sustainable methods to plant facilities and work areas during the design phase of this active project and make recommendations to the design firm for implementation. Following semesters will focus on implementing the recommendations on this plant as it is built. This project will culminate during the construction phase of the project with the implementation of the concepts of sustainable building on the power plant structures.

Based on the above, the IPRO team will explore ideas and concepts and propose a range of creative possibilities through the following types of tasks:
  1. Analyze LEED certification opportunities as the IPRO project unfolds in order to determine which LEED certification level could be achieved based on the IPRO team's work in the following areas.
  2. Potential for conceptualizing that the power plant administration building could be designed as a stand-alone, highly efficient and environmentally responsible Zero Energy Building.
  3. Opportunity to explore concepts for the design of the envelope and enclosure of the power plant in terms of aesthetics, heat cycle, energy utilization for both heating and cooling, etc.
  4. Investigate and evaluate the technical and economic benefits and costs of the latest approaches to building systems that may be appropriate for this application.
  5. Investigate and develop a broad-based analysis of the potential for site sustainability that could span landscaping, geothermal, cooling towers, etc.
Questions and expressions of interest may be addressed to Prof Nancy Hamill (hamill@iit.edu) as well as Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu or 312.567.3986) or Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu or 312.567.3448).return to top

497-356: Techno-Business User-Application Trends Analysis of US Motor & Transformer Electricity Consumption

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

Tempel

Faculty:

Phil Lewis (INTM) (plewis1@iit.edu) and Hanna Korel (ID) (hanna.korel@gmail.com) in consultation with Ian Brown (ECE) (ibrown1@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Business Administration, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Psychology, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

Did you know that upwards of 60 percent of the electricity generated in the US has been attributed to motors? Even a one percent improvement in average motor efficiency would save a huge amount of electricity and reduce the need for new power generating stations. (Source: A.D.Little circa 1975)

Since the mid-1970's no study has been completed to model electricity consumption in motors and transformers in the US. However, in the early 2000's the US Department of Energy (DOE) introduced energy regulations that progressively enforce improved energy efficiency in a selected range of distribution transformers. At the same time, the National Electric Motor Association (NEMA) has developed guidelines for a progressive improvement in energy efficiency for a range of industrial-sized motors. Similar initiatives have begun in Europe and other regions of the globe.

In spite of these steps by government agencies and industry associations, there remain problems and challenges that affect dramatic shifts to more efficient motors and transformers, which in turn affects energy consumption. This is in part due to the fact that while everyone believes that improvements in energy efficiency are worthwhile, no one has quantified the benefits nor undertaken a cost/benefit analysis. The NEMA guidelines are not enforceable so motor manufacturers do not have a major incentive for improvement. There is also a gap in knowledge on how to improve motor efficiencies in the most cost-effective way possible. Finally, there is no coherent body of information that combines motor engineering principles, consumption statistics, and effects of energy efficiency improvements into a model that can offer insights and lead to recommendations that can be used by DOE and others to shape and influence public policy and energy strategy.

Given this background and opportunity, Tempel (http://www.tempel.com) is interested in working with an IPRO team over multiple semesters to establish the coherent body of information described above. The spring 2014 semester would focus on conducting research to understand the scope of the information gathering and analysis challenge as well as frame a strategy for moving forward in subsequent semesters to create, test and refine a model of energy consumption in the US, including consideration of broad industry and consumer trends that affect such consumption and how to identify and monitor them in a consistent and reliable fashion.

The above IPRO purpose can be aided by conducting broad secondary research, as well as surveying major motor and transformer manufacturers and other sources of information. This study could involve investigation of appropriate algorithms and models for depicting and understanding electricity consumption due to motors and transformers and the drivers of technological change that affect future enabling technologies, products, applications, markets and competition. This work could establish a baseline of motor and transformer energy consumption that could be monitored over time to determine progress made toward fully realizing potential energy savings through improved motor and transformer efficiencies. This work could also help to inform public policy strategies combinations of regulations and incentives that stimulate innovation in motor and transformer efficiency improvements. Finally, there may be opportunities for such motor and transformer efficiency and consumption patterns at various levels and in various industries to inform the research, design and planning process for lamination manufacture. A great example is the long term market penetration expected for hybrid and electric vehicles and their demand for motors as well as demand for power, whether via conventional sources or renewables.

This IPRO team will have the benefit of a balanced instructor team in learning and applying market research and survey methods as well as methods associated with user-centered design that help to capture trend information, identify insights and conceptualize opportunities. IIT faculty expertise in power conversion technologies, power electronics and electric machines is also an important resource for the IPRO team in understanding motor and transformer technologies and trends.return to top

497-357: Exploring Information Design & Adaptive Reuse Concepts for the Historic Rosenwald Building

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 10:00 to 11:15 am

Sponsor:

Lighten-Gale Group

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (ID) (mail@limiashunia.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Business Administration, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management, Environmental Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Journalism, Mechanical Engineering, Political Science, Psychology, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

This IPRO project will focus on conducting research and developing viable, creative concepts and a business case for adaptive reuse of the historic Rosenwald building at 47th Street and Michigan Avenue. The IPRO team will have two broad missions:

Part 1: INFORMATION STRATEGY & DESIGN. How do we integrate the rich history of the building into the residential life and office/retail experience of living, working and shopping at the Rosenwald -- telling the Rosenwald story in creative ways that make it meaningful for those who reside and visit? The outputs for this would be a summary of the building history - with a particular focus on the famous people who lived there, recommendations for how to incorporate the history into the building itself (floor themes, naming rooms for people, plaques describing their accomplishments, elements that are contemporary high-tech oriented, etc.), and potentially recommend how to incorporate that information into marketing materials.

Part 2: DEVELOPING AN INCUBATOR SPACE. How can we research the possibility of creating an incubator space into the office building? Many universities are integrating incubator hubs into their campuses, including IIT and its Innovation Center. The IPRO team will research how incubators get funded, the potential demand for an incubator focusing on African-American entrepreneurship at this location (amount of space, likely focus (tech, arts, etc), and potential sponsors/organizers of the space).

An important aspect of this IPRO project that informs both of the above two parts is the opportunity to work with the sponsor and other organizations to research and develop a deep understanding about the community and its residents. It will be important to have conversations with residents and businesses in order to fully capture their views and ideas about the Rosenwald and how it can once again become a vibrant contributor to community life, culture and economic development.

Questions and expressions of interest may be addressed to Professor Limia Shunia (mail@limiashunia.com), Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu or 312.567.3986) or Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu or 312.567.3448).return to top

497-358: Construction Communication System: The SmartHat

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays/Thursdays from 6:25 to 7:40 pm

Sponsor:

Robert Babbin

Faculty:

Mark McKinney (ARCH) (mmckinn5@iit.edu or naoibri@gmail.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business Administration, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Professional & Technical Communication

Description:

New digital communications devices are proliferating and advancing technologically at a rapid pace. This includes advances in personal mobile virtual reality devices, context awareness, and other platforms for personal interaction with the environment around us. At the same time, in the construction industry, BIM (Building Information Modeling) is being incorporated into the construction process and will probably supplant AutoCAD as the leading method for delivering construction documents.

This IPRO project focuses on product research, development and prototyping for a state-of-the-art Construction Communication System called SmartHat. The IPRO team will apply the following process:
  1. Divergence - Exploring possibilities and constraints of inherited situations by applying critical thinking through qualitative and quantitative research methods to create new understanding toward alternative design / constructability solutions
  2. Transformation - Redefining design solutions to improve traditional and contemporary design activities and/or multidisciplinary responses
  3. Convergence - Prototyping scenarios for better design and construction solutions that incrementally or significantly improve the originally inherited situation
  4. Sustainability - Managing the process of exploring, redefining and prototyping of design solutions
  5. Articulation - The visual relationship between the parts and the whole.
This project offers an IPRO team considerable range of opportunity for conducting state-of-the-art research on enabling software and hardware technologies, as well as opportunity to do field work to understand the construction environment, safety considerations, use of mobile devices, etc. This can lead to insights that stimulate brainstorming and iterative prototyping of concepts and solutions with engagement of the intended end users.return to top

497-360: Researching & Understanding Consumer Trends & Experiences in the Home Leading to New Smart Device, Service & App Concepts that Leverage MyQ Technology

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Meeting Days/Time:

Fridays from 10:00 am to 12:40 pm

Sponsor:

The Chamberlain Group, Innovation Center, Elmhurst, Ilinois

Faculty:

Limia Shunia (Institute of Design) (mail@limiashunia.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome, Aerospace Engineering, Applied Mathematics, Architectural Engineering, Architecture, Biomedical Engineering, Business Administration, Business Administration & Applied Science, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Technology & Management, Information Technology & Management, Mechanical Engineering, Professional & Technical Communication, Psychology

Description:

The Chamberlain Group, a global leader of access systems such as garage door openers, has created MyQ smartphone control technology that has been successfully introduced into leading retailers including Apple, Best Buy, Amazon, Verizon and The Home Depot.

People have the same routines practically everyday. For instance, they open and close the garage door without even thinking about it. This “Daily Grind” often causes them to forget things and mishaps occur as a result. MyQ is expanding its system to handle more and more of people's daily routines growing from its core strengths in the access market (i.e. garage door openers) providing benefits in safety and security laddering up to piece of mind that everything is ok at home.

This project will explore an understanding of new opportunities for consumer products, services and apps that enhance the home experience as a natural extension of Chamberlain’s MyQ offerings that provide safety, security and peace of mind. The project should incorporate sound research, trends and insights and deliver successful frameworks and concepts aimed at driving business growth.

The project investigation should include, but is not limited to:
  1. Understanding macro trends and market forces in North America that may present new opportunities for MyQ product line expansion;
  2. Understanding consumer insights & behaviors (ethnography) around the events in the home that occur prior to departing and after arriving through the garage (e.g., turning off the lights, going through the garage passage door, letting the dog out);
  3. The development of consumer types/personas building on Chamberlain supplied segmentation research and new IPRO team discoveries;
  4. Understanding events that occur while away from the home where MyQ notifications or other actions connect the home to the MyQ user(s);
  5. Proposing desirable, viable and feasible concepts for products and/or monetized services/apps that extend the MyQ current offerings; and
  6. Demonstrating “proof of principle” prototypes of the final concept(s).
Final concepts will be evaluated by Chamberlain staff. A concept will be selected and one or more members of the IPRO team will be recognized via a significant "Chamberlain Challenge" award.

Registration for this IPRO section is by permit only, and the team size will be on the order of 10 students from various majors. There is a special intellectual property agreement that students joining the team will review and agree to regarding disposition of any concepts that Chamberlain may wish to develop further.

Interested students should contact Prof Limia Shunia (mail@limiashunia.com), Tom Jacobius (jacobius@iit.edu) or Rima Kuprys (rkuprys@iit.edu) to be considered as a member of the Chamberlain IPRO team. The team will be formed at the first class on Friday, January 17 in the Idea Shop at the Technology Business Center. Interested students are encouraged to come to the Idea Shop on January 17 at 10:30 am to meet the instructor and Chamberlain staff and learn more about the project.return to top

497-361: Virtual Physical+Digital Gaming Collaboration that Bridges the Generations

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Meeting Days/Time:

Tuesdays from 1:50 to 4:30 pm

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Jim Braband (SSB) (braband@iit.edu)

Appropriate Disciplines:

Applied Mathematics, Architecture, Business Administration, Business Administration & Applied Science, Computer Engineering, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Information Technology & Management, Materials Engineering, Math & Science Education, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Psychology

Description:

With the advent of digital games, two-income families and over-programmed children, families have fewer and fewer opportunities to share quality time together. The concept of family time has been reduced to imprisonment in the family room with children glued to their gaming devices while parents try to initiate some meaningful dialogue with them. What happened to the days when parents and children would sit around the table playing board games and talk about what is going on in their lives!

How do we create a game that has the nostalgic appeal of the “good old board games” for parents and grandparents but gives the younger generation the bells and whistles and digital participation they have grown up with while at the same time providing an environment where casual socialization can take place?

The purpose of this IPRO project is to create a hybrid game employing a traditional physical game board which also allows players the option to participate in the game using a digital device, either at site or from a remote location. Over the past two semesters, IPRO teams have created a new board game concept called GangPlank, a pirate game where the goal is to avoid being thrown off the boat and be the last man standing. Significant progress has been during the fall 2013 semester including:
  1. Revising the rules and game elements to maintain player interest, encourage alliances between players and force strategic thinking. This was driven by feedback from preliminary user testing and IPRO Day judging.
  2. Incorporating additional “wow factor” into the game. One example is the use of neo-pixel (LED) strips which have been programmed to show the movement and location of players on the physical game board.
  3. Creating a unique digital version of the game which can be played by multiple players using a computer for game play in lieu of a physical board. This mimics the physical board game as it is the intention to integrate the digital and physical platforms.
  4. Conducting interviews with game developers and owners of specialty game stores to validate interest in the hybrid game concept.
The key objectives for the spring, 2014 semester are as follows:
  1. Integrate the digital and physical versions of the games to permit players to play the game in the traditional board game fashion or through their digital device.
  2. Introduce a camera, microphone and display to allow a remote player (e.g. a parent on a business trip or in military service, a grandparent living in a different town) to socially interact with players gathered around the physical game board.
  3. Design a physical spinner for the board game that has the ability to transmit the result as a digital signal so it can be captured on a digital player’s device.
  4. Conduct user testing with various age groups and with consideration for different player location scenarios.
  5. Investigate the commercial viability of the GangPlank game and the hybrid game concept.
The team would be organized as three sub-teams: Programming, Remote Communication and Commercial Analysis. The most critical activity is the integration of the digital and physical versions of the game which would be the responsibility of the Programming Team. It may need some outside help with some of this work. This team would also be responsible for the physical-to-digital spinner design but this is a “nice-to-have” game element and not a “must have” component for the game and could be deferred or potentially dropped altogether based on feedback from user testing.

The Remote Communication team would be looking at available technologies that would allow ongoing conversation as the game progresses between remote players and players at the game board location. This could consist of verbal communication only or both verbal and visual (e.g. Skype). The team has a contact with the founder of Let’s Play Please who has developed games that use Skype to allow family members to play games with their children while away from home. The company has a similar mission and should be a valuable resource.

The Commercial Analysis team will be responsible for designing and executing a user testing program, completing an opportunity analysis for the team’s product, GangPlank, and investigating the broader merits of the hybrid game concept, i.e. could it be a technology platform for other game designers?return to top

497-363: IIT Pride: Improving Student & University Community Engagement

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Meeting Days/Time:

Mondays from 8:35 to 11:15 am

Sponsor:

Faculty:

Steve Hammond (ID) (stevehammond1@mac.com)

Appropriate Disciplines:

A variety of disciplines are welcome

Description:

Spirit and pride define the soul of an educational institution. Developing spirit and pride requires cultural and climate shifts for the institution's community. This IPRO project will explore the complex nature of school pride with a focus on the effect of athletics on the topic. In the past, research indicated that sporting events are just occurrences not occasions. This IPRO project aims to make attending these sporting events a meaningful experience. Other sources of school and community pride may also be investigated. The team will draw on work done by prior IPROs for inspiration and will develop problem definitions and solutions of their own choosing.

The first objective will be for the IPRO team to define (or redefine) the challenge using techniques from design, creative problem solving and coaching fields. Through repetitive use of both generative and evaluative tools, the team will work to develop products and services that would be useful in building pride in IIT and in IIT athletics. The IPRO team will learn about innovation processes and will use them to develop its deliverables. A key objective is learning what works, what doesn't and why.

The team will use a combination of tools used by designers, creative problem solvers and leadership coaches. Team member will rotate responsibilities for the weekly agenda and execution of a class session. Team members will organize in groups based on the goals, challenges and tasks they choose to address, and will have opportunities to take on different roles during the project. Teamwork and the dynamics of team formation and learning are an important part of the process.

This IPRO project was originally conceived by a core team of students in the IPRO 397 Interprofessional by Design course in fall 2012 (John Rotella, Nick Clancy, Lauren Capuano, Alka Prasade, Alejandra Jaso and Saule Kumarova), introduced to IIT's Tech Traditions committee, and aligned with the interests of IIT athletes. The project was continued as a traditional IPRO project in fall 2013 with Lauren Capuano and a new team.return to top